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Qualitative Health Research

Truls I Juritzen, Helene L Soberg, Cecilie Røe, Martin Saebu, Grace Engen, Trond Bliksvaer, Eivind Engebretsen
This article aims to identify and critically assess qualitative intervention studies of rehabilitation processes that target young adults. By applying a meta-epistemological approach inspired by the works of Michel Foucault and Julia Kristeva, we examine how the included studies present qualitative knowledge and whether they adhere to their own stated principles of qualitative knowledge. Through their stated aims and theoretical framing, the articles draw attention to individual processes of meaning making...
October 16, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Michael A van Manen
Vociferous, shrill, and piercing-the first cry of the newborn infant signals that a new and separate life has begun. Separated from the body of the mother, the newborn cry serves to call for care, support, and protection. Yet, what is it that is expressed in the first cry? Or is the cry not really a matter of expression at all? In what sense may the cry be meaningful? Although we may be able to explain the function of the cry, we are puzzled by the enigma of its meaning. In this study, the science of the first cry is complemented with its physiognomy and genesis...
October 16, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Courtenay Sprague, Michael L Scanlon, Bharathi Radhakrishnan, David W Pantalone
Incarcerated women face significant barriers to achieve continuous HIV care. We employed a descriptive, exploratory design using qualitative methods and the theoretical construct of agency to investigate participants' self-reported experiences accessing HIV services in jail, in prison, and post-release in two Alabama cities. During January 2014, we conducted in-depth interviews with 25 formerly incarcerated HIV-positive women. Two researchers completed independent coding, producing preliminary codes from transcripts using content analysis...
October 14, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Alexandra J Hawkey, Jane M Ussher, Janette Perz, Christine Metusela
Experiences and constructions of menarche and menstruation are shaped by the sociocultural environment in which women are embedded. We explored experiences and constructions of menarche and menstruation among migrant and refugee women resettled in Sydney, Australia, and Vancouver, Canada. Seventy-eight semistructured individual interviews and 15 focus groups comprised of 82 participants were undertaken with women from Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Sri Lanka, and varying South American countries...
October 14, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Brittani Crook, Brad Love
The young adult (YA) cancer community represents an understudied population in interpersonal and health communication scholarship. Through qualitative analysis, this study sought to advance a dark side perspective by exploring the content of messages shared in an online support forum for YAs with cancer. Our findings highlight a variety of complexities YAs face in an online cancer support community, including the light and dark of soliciting support, disclosing to a community, advocacy online, negative sentiment evaluating health care services, and asynchronous communication...
October 14, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Zoi Triandafilidis, Jane M Ussher, Janette Perz, Kate Huppatz
In this article, we explore how young women encounter and counter discourses of smoking-related stigma. Twenty-seven young Australian women, smokers and ex-smokers, took part in interviews. A sub-sample of 18 participants took photographs to document their smoking experience, and took part in a second interview. Data were analyzed through Foucauldian discourse analysis. Four discourses were identified: "smoking as stigmatized," "the smoking double standard," "smoking as lower class," and "smokers as bad mothers...
October 13, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Kate Churruca, Jane M Ussher, Janette Perz
Bulimia, an eating disorder that affects more women than men, involves binging and compensatory behaviors. Given the importance of food in experiences of these behaviors, in this article, we examine constructions of food in accounts of bulimic behavior: how these constructions relate to cultural discourses, and their implications for subjectivity. Fifteen women who engaged in bulimic behaviors were interviewed. Through a thematic decomposition of their accounts, we identified six discursive constructions of food: "good/healthy" or "bad/unhealthy," "contaminating body and soul," "collapsed into fat," "pleasurable reward," "comfort," and "fuel for the body...
October 13, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Sonja Goedeke, Ken Daniels
In New Zealand, embryo donation (ED) is "open," allowing offspring to access genetic information. Donors and recipients meet prior to donation. Drawing on interviews with 15 recipients, 22 donors, and nine counselors, this article discusses how ED may be constructed as a form of gifting. This discourse may evoke expectations that recipients will express gratitude for the gift, including through honoring contact agreements. Donation becomes a relational practice of obligations and counter-obligations. However, the gift discourse may not adequately capture the emotional sacrifice experienced by donors...
October 13, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Monique M Hennink, Bonnie N Kaiser, Vincent C Marconi
Saturation is a core guiding principle to determine sample sizes in qualitative research, yet little methodological research exists on parameters that influence saturation. Our study compared two approaches to assessing saturation: code saturation and meaning saturation. We examined sample sizes needed to reach saturation in each approach, what saturation meant, and how to assess saturation. Examining 25 in-depth interviews, we found that code saturation was reached at nine interviews, whereby the range of thematic issues was identified...
September 25, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
John Hallett, Suzanne Held, Alma Knows His Gun McCormick, Vanessa Simonds, Sloane Real Bird, Christine Martin, Colleen Simpson, Mark Schure, Nicole Turnsplenty, Coleen Trottier
Community-based participatory research and decolonizing research share some recommendations for best practices for conducting research. One commonality is partnering on all stages of research; co-developing methods of data analysis is one stage with a deficit of partnering examples. We present a novel community-based and developed method for analyzing qualitative data within an Indigenous health study and explain incompatibilities of existing methods for our purposes and community needs. We describe how we explored available literature, received counsel from community Elders and experts in the field, and collaboratively developed a data analysis method consonant with community values...
September 21, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Gabriel Alejandro Torres Colón, Sharia Smith, Jenny Fucillo
Concussions are a type of traumatic injury caused by a jolting of the brain that disrupts normal brain function, and multiple concussions can lead to serious long-term health consequences. In this article, we examine the relationship between college students' understanding of concussions and their willingness to continue playing despite the possibility of sustaining multiple head injuries. We use a mixed-methods approach that includes participant observation, cultural domain analysis, and structured interviews...
September 19, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Candace L Kemp, Mary M Ball, Jennifer Craft Morgan, Patrick J Doyle, Elisabeth O Burgess, Joy A Dillard, Christina E Barmon, Andrea F Fitzroy, Victoria E Helmly, Elizabeth S Avent, Molly M Perkins
In this article, we analyze the research experiences associated with a longitudinal qualitative study of residents' care networks in assisted living. Using data from researcher meetings, field notes, and memos, we critically examine our design and decision making and accompanying methodological implications. We focus on one complete wave of data collection involving 28 residents and 114 care network members in four diverse settings followed for 2 years. We identify study features that make our research innovative, but that also represent significant challenges...
September 19, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Sunny Sinha
While much has been said about the risks and safety issues experienced by female sex workers in India, there is a considerable dearth of information about the difficulties and problems that sex work researchers, especially female researchers, experience when navigating the highly political, ideological, and stigmatized environment of the Indian sex industry. As noted by scholars, there are several methodological and ethical issues involved with sex work research, such as privacy and confidentiality of the participants, representativeness of the sample, and informed consent...
September 19, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Darren Langdridge
In this article, I explore the experience of recovery from a heart attack through an analytic autoethnography. I discuss the tensions inherent in biomedical subjectivities of health and ill-health during cardiac recovery through three key themes: (a) the transfer of responsibility and becoming a subject "at risk," (b) technologies of biomedicine and the disciplining of subjectivities, and (c) the transformation of a body toward a new pharmaceuticalized bodily normal. Through an analysis driven by the biomedicalization thesis of Clarke, alongside work on biopower and the governmentality of health by Foucault, Rose, and Rabinow, I seek to provide new insights into the process of cardiac recovery and the relationship between individual experience and broader socio-political processes...
September 14, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Linda Murray, Meredith Nash
Photovoice and photo-elicitation are two common methods of participant photography used in health research. Although participatory photography has many benefits, this critical reflection provides fellow researchers with insights into the methodological and ethical challenges faced when using such methods. In this article, we critically reflect on two studies that used participatory photography in different cultural contexts. The first study used photo-elicitation to investigate mothers' experiences of infant settling in central Vietnam...
September 14, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Roxanne Vandermause, Frances K Barg, Laura Esmail, Lauren Edmundson, Samantha Girard, A Ross Perfetti
The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), created to fund research guided by patients, caregivers, and the broader health care community, offers a new research venue. Many (41 of 50) first funded projects involved qualitative research methods. This study was completed to examine the current state of the science of qualitative methodologies used in PCORI-funded research. Principle investigators participated in phenomenological interviews to learn (a) how do researchers using qualitative methods experience seeking funding for, implementing and disseminating their work; and (b) how may qualitative methods advance the quality and relevance of evidence for patients? Results showed the experience of doing qualitative research in the current research climate as "Being a bona fide qualitative researcher: Staying true to research aims while negotiating challenges," with overlapping patterns: (a) researching the elemental, (b) expecting surprise, and (c) pushing boundaries...
September 14, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Jamie Suki Chang
To understand health, research needs to move outside of controlled research settings into the environments where health activities occur-homes, streets, and neighborhoods. I offer the docent method as a qualitative place-based approach for exploring health in a participant-driven, structured, and flexible way. The docent method is a participant-led, audiotaped, and photographed walking interview through broad "sites of interest" (SOIs). It is rooted in grounded theory and influenced by community-based participatory research and walking interviews...
September 14, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Karen Teshuva, Allan Borowski, Yvonne Wells
Lack of awareness among paid carers of the possible late-life consequences of early-life periods of extreme and prolonged traumatization may have negative impacts on the experiences of trauma survivors in receiving care. An interpretive phenomenological approach was used to investigate the lived experience of paid carers in providing care for Jewish Holocaust survivors. In total, 70 carers participated in 10 focus group discussions. Credibility of the findings was ensured by methodological triangulation and peer debriefing...
September 14, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Julie A Tippens
The global increase in refugee migration to urban areas creates challenges pertaining to the promotion of refugee health, broadly conceived. Despite considerable attention to trauma and forced migration, there is relatively little focus on how refugees cope with stressful situations, and on the determinants that facilitate and undermine resilience. This article examines how urban Congolese refugees in Kenya promote psychosocial well-being in the context of structural vulnerability. This article is based on interviews (N = 55) and ethnographic participant observation with Congolese refugees over a period of 8 months in Nairobi in 2014...
August 25, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
Katherine D Lippa, Markus A Feufel, F Eric Robinson, Valerie L Shalin
Despite increasing prominence, little is known about the cognitive processes underlying shared decision making. To investigate these processes, we conceptualize shared decision making as a form of distributed cognition. We introduce a Decision Space Model to identify physical and social influences on decision making. Using field observations and interviews, we demonstrate that patients and physicians in both acute and chronic care consider these influences when identifying the need for a decision, searching for decision parameters, making actionable decisions Based on the distribution of access to information and actions, we then identify four related patterns: physician dominated; physician-defined, patient-made; patient-defined, physician-made; and patient-dominated decisions...
August 23, 2016: Qualitative Health Research
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