journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Current Biology: CB

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27916527/dynamic-mrna-transport-and-local-translation-in-radial-glial-progenitors-of-the-developing-brain
#1
Louis-Jan Pilaz, Ashley L Lennox, Jeremy P Rouanet, Debra L Silver
In the developing brain, neurons are produced from neural stem cells termed radial glia [1, 2]. Radial glial progenitors span the neuroepithelium, extending long basal processes to form endfeet hundreds of micrometers away from the soma. Basal structures influence neuronal migration, tissue integrity, and proliferation [3-7]. Yet, despite the significance of these distal structures, their cell biology remains poorly characterized, impeding our understanding of how basal processes and endfeet influence neurogenesis...
November 30, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27916525/molecular-basis-of-alarm-pheromone-detection-in-aphids
#2
Ruibin Zhang, Bing Wang, Gerarda Grossi, Patrizia Falabella, Yang Liu, Shanchun Yan, Jian Lu, Jinghui Xi, Guirong Wang
The sesquiterpene (E)-β-farnesene (EBF) is the alarm pheromone for many species of aphids [1]. When released from aphids attacked by parasitoids or predators, it alerts nearby conspecifics to escape by walking away and dropping off the host plant [2, 3]. The reception of alarm pheromone in aphids is accomplished through a highly sensitive chemosensory system. Although olfaction-related gene families including odorant receptors (ORs) and odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) have recently been identified from aphid genomes [4-6], the cellular and molecular mechanisms of EBF reception are still largely unknown...
November 26, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27916522/view-tolerant-face-recognition-and-hebbian-learning-imply-mirror-symmetric-neural-tuning-to-head-orientation
#3
Joel Z Leibo, Qianli Liao, Fabio Anselmi, Winrich A Freiwald, Tomaso Poggio
The primate brain contains a hierarchy of visual areas, dubbed the ventral stream, which rapidly computes object representations that are both specific for object identity and robust against identity-preserving transformations, like depth rotations [1, 2]. Current computational models of object recognition, including recent deep-learning networks, generate these properties through a hierarchy of alternating selectivity-increasing filtering and tolerance-increasing pooling operations, similar to simple-complex cells operations [3-6]...
November 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27916528/repeated-inactivation-of-the-first-committed-enzyme-underlies-the-loss-of-benzaldehyde-emission-after-the-selfing-transition-in-capsella
#4
Claudia Sas, Frank Müller, Christian Kappel, Tyler V Kent, Stephen I Wright, Monika Hilker, Michael Lenhard
The enormous species richness of flowering plants is at least partly due to floral diversification driven by interactions between plants and their animal pollinators [1, 2]. Specific pollinator attraction relies on visual and olfactory floral cues [3-5]; floral scent can not only attract pollinators but also attract or repel herbivorous insects [6-8]. However, despite its central role for plant-animal interactions, the genetic control of floral scent production and its evolutionary modification remain incompletely understood [9-13]...
November 23, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27916526/the-mitochondrial-lon-protease-is-required-for-age-specific-and-sex-specific-adaptation-to-oxidative-stress
#5
Laura C D Pomatto, Caroline Carney, Brenda Shen, Sarah Wong, Kelly Halaszynski, Matthew P Salomon, Kelvin J A Davies, John Tower
Multiple human diseases involving chronic oxidative stress show a significant sex bias, including neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, immune dysfunction, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. However, a possible molecular mechanism for the sex bias in physiological adaptation to oxidative stress remains unclear. Here, we report that Drosophila melanogaster females but not males adapt to hydrogen peroxide stress, whereas males but not females adapt to paraquat (superoxide) stress. Stress adaptation in each sex requires the conserved mitochondrial Lon protease and is associated with sex-specific expression of Lon protein isoforms and proteolytic activity...
November 23, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27916524/gain-and-loss-of-floral-scent-production-through-changes-in-structural-genes-during-pollinator-mediated-speciation
#6
Avichai Amrad, Michel Moser, Therese Mandel, Michel de Vries, Robert C Schuurink, Loreta Freitas, Cris Kuhlemeier
The interactions of plants with their pollinators are thought to be a driving force in the evolution of angiosperms. Adaptation to a new pollinator involves coordinated changes in multiple floral traits controlled by multiple genes. Surprisingly, such complex genetic shifts have happened numerous times during evolution. Here we report on the genetic basis of the changes in one such trait, floral scent emission, in the genus Petunia (Solanaceae). The increase in the quantity and complexity of the volatiles during the shift from bee to hawkmoth pollination was due to de novo expression of the genes encoding benzoic acid/salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (BSMT) and benzoyl-CoA:benzylalcohol/2-phenylethanol benzoyltransferase (BPBT) together with moderately increased transcript levels for most enzymes of the phenylpropanoid/benzenoid pathway...
November 22, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27916523/localized-mechanical-stress-promotes-microtubule-rescue
#7
Hélène de Forges, Antoine Pilon, Isabelle Cantaloube, Antoine Pallandre, Anne-Marie Haghiri-Gosnet, Franck Perez, Christian Poüs
Microtubule dynamics rely on the properties of tubulin and are regulated by microtubule-associated proteins. GTP-tubulin assembles into hollow polymers, which can depolymerize upon GTP hydrolysis. Depolymerizing microtubules may stop shrinking and resume growth. Such rescues are regulated by microtubule-associated proteins like CLIP-170 and the CLASPs [1, 2]. Microtubule domains prone to rescues contain discrete regions (previously termed "GTP islands") that retain a GTP-tubulin-like conformation in the main body of the microtubule [3]...
November 22, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27889263/shade-promotes-phototropism-through-phytochrome-b-controlled-auxin-production
#8
Anupama Goyal, Elizabeth Karayekov, Vinicius Costa Galvão, Hong Ren, Jorge J Casal, Christian Fankhauser
Phototropism is an asymmetric growth response enabling plants to optimally position their organs. In flowering plants, the phototropin (phot) blue light receptors are essential to detect light gradients. In etiolated seedlings, the phototropic response is enhanced by the red/far-red (R/FR)-sensing phytochromes (phy) with a predominant function of phyA. In this study, we analyzed the influence of the phytochromes on phototropism in green (de-etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings. Our experiments in the laboratory and outdoors revealed that, in open environments (high R/FR ratio), phyB inhibits phototropism...
November 22, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27889262/injections-of-predatory-bacteria-work-alongside-host-immune-cells-to-treat-shigella-infection-in-zebrafish-larvae
#9
Alexandra R Willis, Christopher Moore, Maria Mazon-Moya, Sina Krokowski, Carey Lambert, Robert Till, Serge Mostowy, R Elizabeth Sockett
Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus are predatory bacteria that invade and kill a range of Gram-negative bacterial pathogens in natural environments and in vitro [1, 2]. In this study, we investigated Bdellovibrio as an injected, antibacterial treatment in vivo, using zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae infected with an antibiotic-resistant strain of the human pathogen Shigella flexneri. When injected alone, Bdellovibrio can persist for more than 24 hr in vivo yet exert no pathogenic effects on zebrafish larvae. Bdellovibrio injection of zebrafish containing a lethal dose of Shigella promotes pathogen killing, leading to increased zebrafish survival...
November 22, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27889265/integration-of-phytochrome-and-cryptochrome-signals-determines-plant-growth-during-competition-for-light
#10
Mieke de Wit, Diederik H Keuskamp, Franca J Bongers, Patricia Hornitschek, Charlotte M M Gommers, Emilie Reinen, Carmen Martínez-Cerón, Christian Fankhauser, Ronald Pierik
Plants in dense vegetation perceive their neighbors primarily through changes in light quality. Initially, the ratio between red (R) and far-red (FR) light decreases due to reflection of FR by plant tissue well before shading occurs. Perception of low R:FR by the phytochrome photoreceptors induces the shade avoidance response [1], of which accelerated elongation growth of leaf-bearing organs is an important feature. Low R:FR-induced phytochrome inactivation leads to the accumulation and activation of the transcription factors PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTORs (PIFs) 4, 5, and 7 and subsequent expression of their growth-mediating targets [2, 3]...
November 17, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27866893/effective-connectivity-reveals-largely-independent-parallel-networks-of-face-and-body-patches
#11
Elsie Premereur, Jessica Taubert, Peter Janssen, Rufin Vogels, Wim Vanduffel
The primate brain processes objects in the ventral visual pathway. One object category, faces, is processed in a hierarchical network of interconnected areas along this pathway. It remains unknown whether such an interconnected network is specific for faces or whether there are similar networks for other object classes. For example, the primate inferotemporal cortex also contains a set of body-selective patches, adjacent to the face-selective patches, but it is not known whether these body-selective patches form a similar discretely connected network or whether cross-talk exists between the face- and body-processing systems...
November 16, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27889261/nik-map3k14-regulates-mitochondrial-dynamics-and-trafficking-to-promote-cell-invasion
#12
Ji-Ung Jung, Sowndharya Ravi, Dong W Lee, Kassandra McFadden, Michael L Kamradt, L Gerard Toussaint, Raquel Sitcheran
Although the role of NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) in immunity is well established, its relevance in cancer is just emerging. Here we describe novel functions for NIK in regulating mitochondrial dynamics and motility to promote cell invasion. We show that NIK is localized to mitochondria in cancer cell lines, ex vivo tumor tissue, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). NIK promotes mitochondrial fission, velocity, and directional migration, resulting in subcellular distribution of mitochondria to the periphery of migrating cells...
November 15, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27889260/two-bistable-switches-govern-m-phase-entry
#13
Satoru Mochida, Scott Rata, Hirotsugu Hino, Takeharu Nagai, Béla Novák
The abrupt and irreversible transition from interphase to M phase is essential to separate DNA replication from chromosome segregation. This transition requires the switch-like phosphorylation of hundreds of proteins by the cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1):cyclin B (CycB) complex. Previous studies have ascribed these switch-like phosphorylations to the auto-activation of Cdk1:CycB through the removal of inhibitory phosphorylations on Cdk1-Tyr15 [1, 2]. The positive feedback in Cdk1 activation creates a bistable switch that makes mitotic commitment irreversible [2-4]...
November 15, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27866888/comparative-analysis-of-ciliary-membranes-and-ectosomes
#14
Huan Long, Fan Zhang, Nannan Xu, Gai Liu, Dennis R Diener, Joel L Rosenbaum, Kaiyao Huang
Primary and motile cilia/flagella function as cellular antennae, receiving signals from the environment and subsequently activating signaling pathways that are critical for cellular homeostasis and differentiation [1-3]. Recent work with the green alga Chlamydomonas and the nematode C. elegans demonstrated that ectosomes can be released from the cilium and can mediate the intercellular communication [4-9]. To better understand the function of flagellar ectosomes, we have compared their protein composition to that of the flagellar membrane from which they are derived...
November 10, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27839976/archaic-hominin-admixture-facilitated-adaptation-to-out-of-africa-environments
#15
Rachel M Gittelman, Joshua G Schraiber, Benjamin Vernot, Carmen Mikacenic, Mark M Wurfel, Joshua M Akey
As modern humans dispersed from Africa throughout the world, they encountered and interbred with archaic hominins, including Neanderthals and Denisovans [1, 2]. Although genome-scale maps of introgressed sequences have been constructed [3-6], considerable gaps in knowledge remain about the functional, phenotypic, and evolutionary significance of archaic hominin DNA that persists in present-day individuals. Here, we describe a comprehensive set of analyses that identified 126 high-frequency archaic haplotypes as putative targets of adaptive introgression in geographically diverse populations...
November 9, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27818175/rpa-binding-protein-etaa1-is-an-atr-activator-involved-in-dna-replication-stress-response
#16
Yuan-Cho Lee, Qing Zhou, Junjie Chen, Jingsong Yuan
ETAA1 (Ewing tumor-associated antigen 1), also known as ETAA16, was identified as a tumor-specific antigen in the Ewing family of tumors. However, the biological function of this protein remains unknown. Here, we report the identification of ETAA1 as a DNA replication stress response protein. ETAA1 specifically interacts with RPA (Replication protein A) via two conserved RPA-binding domains and is therefore recruited to stalled replication forks. Interestingly, further analysis of ETAA1 function revealed that ETAA1 participates in the activation of ATR signaling pathway via a conserved ATR-activating domain (AAD) located near its N terminus...
November 2, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27773569/loss-and-re-emergence-of-legs-in-snakes-by-modular-evolution-of-sonic-hedgehog-and-hoxd-enhancers
#17
Francisca Leal, Martin J Cohn
Limb reduction and loss are hallmarks of snake evolution. Although advanced snakes are completely limbless, basal and intermediate snakes retain pelvic girdles and small rudiments of the femur. Moreover, legs may have re-emerged in extinct snake lineages [1-5], suggesting that the mechanisms of limb development were not completely lost in snakes. Here we report that hindlimb development arrests in python embryos as a result of mutations that abolish essential transcription factor binding sites in the limb-specific enhancer of Sonic hedgehog (SHH)...
October 19, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27746027/epithelial-cell-packing-induces-distinct-modes-of-cell-extrusions
#18
Leyla Kocgozlu, Thuan Beng Saw, Anh Phuong Le, Ivan Yow, Murat Shagirov, Eunice Wong, René-Marc Mège, Chwee Teck Lim, Yusuke Toyama, Benoit Ladoux
The control of tissue growth, which is a key to maintain the protective barrier function of the epithelium, depends on the balance between cell division and cell extrusion rates [1, 2]. Cells within confluent epithelial layers undergo cell extrusion, which relies on cell-cell interactions [3] and actomyosin contractility [4, 5]. Although it has been reported that cell extrusion is also dependent on cell density [6, 7], the contribution of tissue mechanics, which is tightly regulated by cell density [8-12], to cell extrusion is still poorly understood...
October 5, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27720620/awakening-of-a-dormant-cyanobacterium-from-nitrogen-chlorosis-reveals-a-genetically-determined-program
#19
Alexander Klotz, Jens Georg, Lenka Bučinská, Satoru Watanabe, Viktoria Reimann, Witold Januszewski, Roman Sobotka, Dieter Jendrossek, Wolfgang R Hess, Karl Forchhammer
The molecular and physiological mechanisms involved in the transition of microbial cells from a resting state to the active vegetative state are critically relevant for solving problems in fields ranging from microbial ecology to infection microbiology. Cyanobacteria that cannot fix nitrogen are able to survive prolonged periods of nitrogen starvation as chlorotic cells in a dormant state. When provided with a usable nitrogen source, these cells re-green within 48 hr and return to vegetative growth. Here we investigated the resuscitation of chlorotic Synechocystis sp...
October 5, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27720623/intraspinal-sensory-neurons-provide-powerful-inhibition-to-motor-circuits-ensuring-postural-control-during-locomotion
#20
Jeffrey Michael Hubbard, Urs Lucas Böhm, Andrew Prendergast, Po-En Brian Tseng, Morgan Newman, Caleb Stokes, Claire Wyart
In the vertebrate spinal cord, cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs) are GABAergic neurons whose functions are only beginning to unfold. Recent evidence indicates that CSF-cNs detect local spinal bending and relay this mechanosensory feedback information to motor circuits, yet many CSF-cN targets remain unknown. Using optogenetics, patterned illumination, and in vivo electrophysiology, we show here that CSF-cNs provide somatic inhibition to fast motor neurons and excitatory sensory interneurons involved in the escape circuit...
October 4, 2016: Current Biology: CB
journal
journal
30739
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"