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Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29785663/enterobacteria-and-host-resistance-to-infection
#1
REVIEW
Eugene Kang, Alanna Crouse, Lucie Chevallier, Stéphanie M Pontier, Ashwag Alzahrani, Navoun Silué, François-Xavier Campbell-Valois, Xavier Montagutelli, Samantha Gruenheid, Danielle Malo
Enterobacteriaceae are a large family of Gram-negative, non-spore-forming bacteria. Although many species exist as part of the natural flora of animals including humans, some members are associated with both intestinal and extraintestinal diseases. In this review, we focus on members of this family that have important roles in human disease: Salmonella, Escherichia, Shigella, and Yersinia, providing a brief overview of the disease caused by these bacteria, highlighting the contribution of animal models to our understanding of their pathogenesis and of host genetic determinants involved in susceptibility or resistance to infection...
May 21, 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29777385/changes-in-selection-intensity-on-the-mitogenome-of-subterranean-and-fossorial-rodents-respective-to-aboveground-species
#2
William Corrêa Tavares, Hector N Seuánez
Several rodent lineages independently acquired the ability to dig complex networks of tunnels where fossorial and subterranean species spend part or their whole life, respectively. Their underground lifestyles imposed harsh physiological demands, presumably triggering strong selective pressures on genes involved in energy metabolism like those coding for mitochondrial proteins. Moreover, underground lifestyles must have increased inbreeding and susceptibility to population bottlenecks as well as restricted migration, leading to small effective population size (Ne ) that, in turn, must have reduced the effectiveness of selection...
May 18, 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29740698/meeting-report-31st-international-mammalian-genome-conference-mammalian-genetics-and-genomics-from-molecular-mechanisms-to-translational-applications
#3
REVIEW
Gabriela Sánchez-Andrade, Jacob Moskowitz, Selene Howe, Teresa M Gunn
High on the Heidelberg hills, inside the Advanced Training Centre of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) campus with its unique double-helix staircase, scientists gathered for the EMBL conference "Mammalian Genetics and Genomics: From Molecular Mechanisms to Translational Applications," organized in cooperation with the International Mammalian Genome Society (IMGS) and the Mouse Molecular Genetics (MMG) group. The conference attracted 205 participants from 30 countries, representing 6 of the 7 continents-all except Antarctica...
May 8, 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29737391/burly1-is-a-mouse-qtl-for-lean-body-mass-that-maps-to-a-0-8-mb-region-of-chromosome-2
#4
Cailu Lin, Brad D Fesi, Michael Marquis, Natalia P Bosak, Anna Lysenko, Mohammed Amin Koshnevisan, Fujiko F Duke, Maria L Theodorides, Theodore M Nelson, Amanda H McDaniel, Mauricio Avigdor, Charles J Arayata, Lauren Shaw, Alexander A Bachmanov, Danielle R Reed
To fine map a mouse QTL for lean body mass (Burly1), we used information from intercross, backcross, consomic, and congenic mice derived from the C57BL/6ByJ (host) and 129P3/J (donor) strains. The results from these mapping populations were concordant and showed that Burly1 is located between 151.9 and 152.7 Mb (rs33197365 to rs3700604) on mouse chromosome 2. The congenic region harboring Burly1 contains 26 protein-coding genes, 11 noncoding RNA elements (e.g., lncRNA), and 4 pseudogenes, with 1949 predicted functional variants...
May 8, 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29691636/genome-wide-association-for-testis-weight-in-the-diversity-outbred-mouse-population
#5
Joshua T Yuan, Daniel M Gatti, Vivek M Philip, Steven Kasparek, Andrew M Kreuzman, Benjamin Mansky, Kayvon Sharif, Dominik Taterra, Walter M Taylor, Mary Thomas, Jeremy O Ward, Andrew Holmes, Elissa J Chesler, Clarissa C Parker
Testis weight is a genetically mediated trait associated with reproductive efficiency across numerous species. We sought to evaluate the genetically diverse, highly recombinant Diversity Outbred (DO) mouse population as a tool to identify and map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with testis weight. Testis weights were recorded for 502 male DO mice and the mice were genotyped on the GIGAMuga array at ~ 143,000 SNPs. We performed a genome-wide association analysis and identified one significant and two suggestive QTLs associated with testis weight...
April 24, 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29594458/host-genetics-in-malaria-lessons-from-mouse-studies
#6
REVIEW
Hong Ming Huang, Brendan J McMorran, Simon J Foote, Gaetan Burgio
Malaria remains a deadly parasitic disease caused by Plasmodium, claiming almost half a million lives every year. While parasite genetics and biology are often the major targets in many studies, it is becoming more evident that host genetics plays a crucial role in the outcome of the infection. Similarly, Plasmodium infections in mice also rely heavily on the genetic background of the mice, and often correlate with observations in human studies, due to their high genetic homology with humans. As such, murine models of malaria are a useful tool for understanding host responses during Plasmodium infections, as well as dissecting host-parasite interactions through various genetic manipulation techniques...
March 28, 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29536159/loss-of-the-zona-pellucida-binding-protein-2-zpbp2-gene-in-mice-impacts-airway-hypersensitivity-and-lung-lipid-metabolism-in-a-sex-dependent-fashion
#7
Cynthia Kanagaratham, Victoria Chiwara, Bianca Ho, Sanny Moussette, Mina Youssef, David Venuto, Lucie Jeannotte, Guillaume Bourque, Juan Bautista de Sanctis, Danuta Radzioch, Anna K Naumova
The human chromosomal region 17q12-q21 is one of the best replicated genome-wide association study loci for childhood asthma. The associated SNPs span a large genomic interval that includes several protein-coding genes. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the zona pellucida-binding protein 2 (ZPBP2) gene residing in this region contributes to asthma pathogenesis using a mouse model. We tested the lung phenotypes of knock-out (KO) mice that carry a deletion of the Zpbp2 gene. The deletion attenuated airway hypersensitivity (AHR) in female, but not male, mice in the absence of allergic sensitization...
April 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29523950/congenic-mapping-and-candidate-gene-analysis-for-streptozotocin-induced-diabetes-susceptibility-locus-on-mouse-chromosome-11
#8
Tomoki Maegawa, Yuki Miyasaka, Misato Kobayashi, Naru Babaya, Hiroshi Ikegami, Fumihiko Horio, Masahide Takahashi, Tamio Ohno
Streptozotocin (STZ) has been widely used to induce diabetes in rodents. Strain-dependent variation in susceptibility to STZ has been reported; however, the gene(s) responsible for STZ susceptibility has not been identified. Here, we utilized the A/J-11SM consomic strain and a set of chromosome 11 (Chr. 11) congenic strains developed from A/J-11SM to identify a candidate STZ-induced diabetes susceptibility gene. The A/J strain exhibited significantly higher susceptibility to STZ-induced diabetes than the A/J-11SM strain, confirming the existence of a susceptibility locus on Chr...
April 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29487996/genetic-variation-in-sensitivity-to-estrogens-and-breast-cancer-risk
#9
D Joseph Jerry, James D Shull, Darryl L Hadsell, Monique Rijnkels, Karen A Dunphy, Sallie S Schneider, Laura N Vandenberg, Prabin Dhangada Majhi, Celia Byrne, Amy Trentham-Dietz
Breast cancer risk is intimately intertwined with exposure to estrogens. While more than 160 breast cancer risk loci have been identified in humans, genetic interactions with estrogen exposure remain to be established. Strains of rodents exhibit striking differences in their responses to endogenous ovarian estrogens (primarily 17β-estradiol). Similar genetic variation has been observed for synthetic estrogen agonists (ethinyl estradiol) and environmental chemicals that mimic the actions of estrogens (xenoestrogens)...
February 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29476236/leveraging-human-genetic-and-adverse-outcome-pathway-aop-data-to-inform-susceptibility-in-human-health-risk-assessment
#10
Holly M Mortensen, John Chamberlin, Bonnie Joubert, Michelle Angrish, Nisha Sipes, Janice S Lee, Susan Y Euling
Estimation of susceptibility differences in human health risk assessment (HHRA) has been challenged by a lack of available susceptibility and variability data after exposure to a specific environmental chemical or pharmaceutical. With the increasingly large number of available data sources that contain polymorphism and other genetic data, human genetic variability that informs susceptibility can be better incorporated into HHRA. A recent policy, the 2016 The Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the twenty-first Century Act, requires the US Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate new and existing toxic chemicals with explicit consideration of susceptible populations of all types (life stage, exposure, genetic, etc...
February 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29460122/introduction-to-mammalian-genome-special-issue-the-combined-role-of-genetics-and-environment-relevant-to-human-disease-outcomes
#11
EDITORIAL
Ivan Rusyn, Steven R Kleeberger, Kimberly A McAllister, John E French, Karen L Svenson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29453499/screening-for-gene-environment-g%C3%A3-e-interaction-using-omics-data-from-exposed-individuals-an-application-to-gene-arsenic-interaction
#12
Maria Argos, Lin Tong, Shantanu Roy, Mekala Sabarinathan, Alauddin Ahmed, Md Tariqul Islam, Tariqul Islam, Muhammad Rakibuz-Zaman, Golam Sarwar, Hasan Shahriar, Mahfuzar Rahman, Md Yunus, Joseph H Graziano, Farzana Jasmine, Muhammad G Kibriya, Xiang Zhou, Habibul Ahsan, Brandon L Pierce
Identifying gene-environment interactions is a central challenge in the quest to understand susceptibility to complex, multi-factorial diseases. Developing an understanding of how inter-individual variability in inherited genetic variation alters the effects of environmental exposures will enhance our knowledge of disease mechanisms and improve our ability to predict disease and target interventions to high-risk sub-populations. Limited progress has been made identifying gene-environment interactions in the epidemiological setting using existing statistical approaches for genome-wide searches for interaction...
February 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29429127/tissue-and-strain-specific-effects-of-a-genotoxic-carcinogen-1-3-butadiene-on-chromatin-and-transcription
#13
Jennifer W Israel, Grace A Chappell, Jeremy M Simon, Sebastian Pott, Alexias Safi, Lauren Lewis, Paul Cotney, Hala S Boulos, Wanda Bodnar, Jason D Lieb, Gregory E Crawford, Terrence S Furey, Ivan Rusyn
Epigenetic effects of environmental chemicals are under intense investigation to fill existing knowledge gaps between environmental/occupational exposures and adverse health outcomes. Chromatin accessibility is one prominent mechanism of epigenetic control of transcription, and understanding of the chemical effects on both could inform the causal role of epigenetic alterations in disease mechanisms. In this study, we hypothesized that baseline variability in chromatin organization and transcription profiles among various tissues and mouse strains influence the outcome of exposure to the DNA damaging chemical 1,3-butadiene...
February 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29429126/individual-susceptibility-to-arsenic-induced-diseases-the-role-of-host-genetics-nutritional-status-and-the-gut-microbiome
#14
REVIEW
Liang Chi, Bei Gao, Pengcheng Tu, Chih-Wei Liu, Jingchuan Xue, Yunjia Lai, Hongyu Ru, Kun Lu
Arsenic (As) contamination in water or food is a global issue affecting hundreds of millions of people. Although As is classified as a group 1 carcinogen and is associated with multiple diseases, the individual susceptibility to As-related diseases is highly variable, such that a proportion of people exposed to As have higher risks of developing related disorders. Many factors have been found to be associated with As susceptibility. One of the main sources of the variability found in As susceptibility is the variation in the host genome, namely, polymorphisms of many genes involved in As transportation, biotransformation, oxidative stress response, and DNA repair affect the susceptibility of an individual to As toxicity and then influence the disease outcomes...
February 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29356897/inter-individual-variation-in-adaptations-to-endurance-and-resistance-exercise-training-genetic-approaches-towards-understanding-a-complex-phenotype
#15
Heather L Vellers, Steven R Kleeberger, J Timothy Lightfoot
Exercise training which meets the recommendations set by the National Physical Activity Guidelines ensues a multitude of health benefits towards the prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases. However, not all individuals respond well to exercise training. That is, some individuals have no response, while others respond poorly. Genetic background is known to contribute to the inter-individual (human) and -strain (e.g., mice, rats) variation with acute exercise and exercise training, though to date, no specific genetic factors have been identified that explain the differential responses to exercise...
February 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29353387/inter-individual-variation-in-health-and-disease-associated-with-pulmonary-infectious-agents
#16
Kirsten C Verhein, Heather L Vellers, Steven R Kleeberger
Respiratory infectious diseases resulting from bacterial or viral pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), or influenza, are major global public health concerns. Lower respiratory tract infections are leading causes of morbidity and mortality, only behind ischemic heart disease and stroke (GBD 2015 LRI Collaborators in Lancet Infect Dis 17(11):1133-1161, 2017). Developing countries are particularly impacted by these diseases. However, while many are infected with viruses such as RSV (> 90% of all individuals are infected by age 2), only sub-populations develop severe disease...
February 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29353386/population-based-dose-response-analysis-of-liver-transcriptional-response-to-trichloroethylene-in-mouse
#17
Abhishek Venkatratnam, John S House, Kranti Konganti, Connor McKenney, David W Threadgill, Weihsueh A Chiu, David L Aylor, Fred A Wright, Ivan Rusyn
Studies of gene expression are common in toxicology and provide important clues to mechanistic understanding of adverse effects of chemicals. Most prior studies have been performed in a single strain or cell line; however, gene expression is heavily influenced by the genetic background, and these genotype-expression differences may be key drivers of inter-individual variation in response to chemical toxicity. In this study, we hypothesized that the genetically diverse Collaborative Cross mouse population can be used to gain insight and suggest mechanistic hypotheses for the dose- and genetic background-dependent effects of chemical exposure...
February 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29299621/advancing-chemical-risk-assessment-decision-making-with-population-variability-data-challenges-and-opportunities
#18
Weihsueh A Chiu, Ivan Rusyn
Characterizing population variability, including identifying susceptible populations and quantifying their increased susceptibility, is an important aspect of chemical risk assessment, but one that is challenging with traditional experimental models and risk assessment methods. New models and methods to address population variability can be used to advance the human health assessments of chemicals in three key areas. First, with respect to hazard identification, evaluating toxicity using population-based in vitro and in vivo models can potentially reduce both false positive and false negative signals...
February 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29279960/quantitative-trait-mapping-in-diversity-outbred-mice-identifies-two-genomic-regions-associated-with-heart-size
#19
John R Shorter, Wei Huang, Ju Youn Beak, Kunjie Hua, Daniel M Gatti, Fernando Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Daniel Pomp, Brian C Jensen
Heart size is an important factor in cardiac health and disease. In particular, increased heart weight is predictive of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in multiple large community-based studies. We use two cohorts of Diversity Outbred (DO) mice to investigate the role of genetics, sex, age, and diet on heart size. DO mice (n = 289) of both sexes from generation 10 were fed a standard chow diet, and analyzed at 12-15 weeks of age. Another cohort of female DO mice (n = 258) from generation 11 were fed either a high-fat, cholesterol-containing (HFC) diet or a low-fat, high-protein diet, and analyzed at 24-25 weeks...
February 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29218402/linking-inter-individual-variability-to-endocrine-disruptors-insights-for-epigenetic-inheritance
#20
Sarah E Latchney, Ashley M Fields, Martha Susiarjo
Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can induce a myriad of adverse health effects. An area of active investigation is the multi- and transgenerational inheritance of EDC-induced adverse health effects referring to the transmission of phenotypes across multiple generations via the germline. The inheritance of EDC-induced adverse health effects across multiple generations can occur independent of genetics, spurring much research into the transmission of underlying epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic mechanisms play important roles in the development of an organism and are responsive to environmental exposures...
February 2018: Mammalian Genome: Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society
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