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History of Psychiatry

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27895196/from-asylum-to-action-in-scotland-the-emergence-of-the-scottish-union-of-mental-patients-1971-2
#1
Mark Gallagher
By analysing a collection of documents authored by Thomas Ritchie, founder of the Scottish Union of Mental Patients (SUMP), this study recounts the emergence of mental patient unionism at Hartwood Hospital, North Lanarkshire, Scotland. The discourse and action employed by Ritchie and SUMP are understood and situated in relation to intended audiences, social and material conditions of the asylum space, and transformations in cultures beyond the asylum, including nascent industrial strife, social liberalism, civil rights, the London 'underground' and counter-cultures...
November 28, 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27895195/a-scottish-poor-law-of-lunacy-poor-law-lunacy-law-and-scotland-s-parochial-asylums
#2
Lauren Farquharson
Scotland's parochial asylums are unfamiliar institutional spaces. Representing the concrete manifestation of the collision between two spheres of legislation, the Poor Law and the Lunacy Law, six such asylums were constructed in the latter half of the nineteenth century. These sites expressed the enduring mandate of the Scottish Poor Law 1845 over the domain of 'madness'. They were institutions whose very existence was fashioned at the directive of the local arm of the Poor Law, the parochial board, and they constituted a continuing 'Scottish Poor Law of Lunacy'...
November 28, 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27834293/-the-head-carver-art-extraordinary-and-the-small-spaces-of-asylum
#3
Cheryl McGeachan
This paper uses the unique collection of Scottish outsider art, labelled Art Extraordinary, as a window into the often neglected small spaces of asylum care in the early twentieth century. By drawing upon materials from the Art Extraordinary collection and its associated archives, this paper demonstrates the importance of incorporating small and everyday spaces of care - such as gardens, paths, studios and boats - into the broader historical narratives of psychiatric care in Scotland. Examples of experiential memorialization and counterpoints to asylum surveillance culture will be illuminated...
November 10, 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27803237/reconstructing-the-eclectic-psychiatry-of-thomas-ferguson-rodger
#4
Sarah Phelan
This article provides an introduction to the approach of the Scottish psychiatrist Thomas Ferguson Rodger (1907-78), as reconstructed from his archive. Rodger's contribution has been largely neglected within the history of Scottish psychiatry. This paper amends this neglect through situating Rodger's eclecticism in relation to both the biopsychosocial approach of his mentors, Adolf Meyer and David Henderson, and psychiatry's de-institutionalization in the 1950s and 1960s. It is posited that Rodger's eclecticism was a considered response to the pressures of this transitional phase to balance physical, psychological and social approaches, and a critical acknowledgement of the instability of contemporary psychiatric therapeutics...
November 1, 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27789588/henderson-and-meyer-in-correspondence-a-transatlantic-history-of-dynamic-psychiatry-1908-29
#5
Hazel Morrison
Charting a transatlantic movement of so-called 'dynamic psychiatry' during the early twentieth century, this paper reads against the grain of established historiographies. Comparing biographical and autobiographical sources with contemporary correspondence, a history is told which considers the evolution of psychiatric knowledge and clinical practices 'from below'. Revealing a period and place when a 'dynamic' counter-culture challenged the established materialist views of Scottish psychiatry, the longevity of this challenge is considered in the concluding paragraphs...
October 27, 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27770055/-heading-up-a-blind-alley-scottish-psychiatric-hospitals-in-the-era-of-deinstitutionalization
#6
Vicky Long
This article examines Scottish provision of psychiatric care in the 1960s and 1970s. It demonstrates that institutional services did not rapidly disappear across the UK following the Ministry of Health's decision to shut down psychiatric hospitals in 1961, and highlights Scotland's distinctive trajectory. Furthermore, it contends that psychiatric hospitals developed new approaches to assist patients in this era, thereby contributing towards the transformation of post-war psychiatric practice. Connecting a discussion of policy with an analysis of provision, it examines the Department of Health for Scotland's cautious response to the Ministry's embrace of deinstitutionalization, before analysing Glasgow's psychiatric provision in the 1970s...
October 21, 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27698075/-noisy-restless-and-incoherent-puerperal-insanity-at-dundee-lunatic-asylum
#7
Morag Allan Campbell
Puerperal insanity has been described as a nineteenth-century diagnosis, entrenched in contemporary expectations of proper womanly behaviour. Drawing on detailed study of establishment registers and patient case notes, this paper examines the puerperal insanity diagnosis at Dundee Lunatic Asylum between 1820 and 1860. In particular, the study aims to consider whether the class or social status of the patients had a bearing on how their conditions were perceived and rationalized, and how far the puerperal insanity diagnosis, coloured by the values assigned to it by the medical officers, may have been reserved for some women and not for others...
October 3, 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837148/dissertation-abstracts
#8
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837147/book-review-barbara-taylor-the-last-asylum-a-memoir-of-madness-in-our-times
#9
Leonard Smith
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27837146/book-review-catharine-coleborne-insanity-identity-and-empire-immigrants-and-institutional-confinement-in-australia-and-new-zealand-1873-1910
#10
Mark Finnane
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27473735/response-by-the-author-received-19-april-2016
#11
LETTER
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27473734/s-shamdasani-and-the-serial-exemplarity-of-mediumship-in-jung-s-work-a-critique-received-8-february-2016
#12
LETTER
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27473733/book-review-annie-bartlett-secure-lives-the-meaning-importance-of-culture-in-secure-hospital-care
#13
Erin J Lux
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27473732/book-review-gabriel-n-mendes-under-the-strain-of-color-harlem-s-lafargue-clinic-and-the-promise-of-an-antiracist-psychiatry
#14
Dennis Doyle
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27473731/book-review-michel-guy-thompson-ed-the-legacy-of-r-d-laing-an-appraisal-of-his-contemporary-relevance
#15
Oisín Wall
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27473730/book-review-david-w-jones-disordered-personalities-and-crime-an-analysis-of-the-history-of-moral-insanity
#16
John Callender
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27473729/joseph-maxwell-on-mediumistic-personifications
#17
Carlos S Alvarado
The study of mediumship received much impetus from the work of psychical researchers. This included ideas about the phenomena of personation, or changes in attitudes, dispositions and behaviours shown by some mediums that supposedly indicated discarnate action. The aim of this Classic Text is to reprint passages about this topic from the writings of French psychical researcher Joseph Maxwell (1858-1938), which were part of the contributions of some psychical researchers to reconceptualize the manifestations in psychological terms...
September 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27271002/theory-of-mind-and-verstehen-understanding-methodology
#18
Tsutomu Kumazaki
Theory of mind is a prominent, but highly controversial, field in psychology, psychiatry, and philosophy of mind. Simulation theory, theory-theory and other views have been presented in recent decades, none of which are monolithic. In this article, various views on theory of mind are reviewed, and methodological problems within each view are investigated. The relationship between simulation theory and Verstehen (understanding) methodology in traditional human sciences is an intriguing issue, although the latter is not a direct ancestor of the former...
September 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27225418/taphophobia-and-life-preserving-coffins-in-the-nineteenth-century
#19
Marco Cascella
In 1891 the Italian psychiatrist Enrico Morselli (1852-1929) described taphophobia, defining it as an extreme condition of claustrophobia due to the fear of being buried alive. This rare psychopathological phenomenon reflects an ancient fear, and its origin is not known. Taphophobia is closely linked to the problem of apparent death and premature burial. In the nineteenth century, scientists and authors paid particular attention to the issue of apparent death, and special devices (safety coffins) were invented to ensure that premature burial was avoided...
September 2016: History of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27194114/max-scheler-s-influence-on-kurt-schneider
#20
John Cutting, Maria Mouratidou, Thomas Fuchs, Gareth Owen
Kurt Schneider (1887-1967) met Max Scheler (1874-1928) in 1919 when he enrolled in the latter's philosophy seminars at the University of Cologne. Kurt Schneider was then a junior psychiatrist and Max Scheler a renowned philosophy professor and co-founder of the phenomenological movement in philosophy. We uncover the facts about their intellectual and personal relationship, summarize the main articles and books that they wrote and consider whether Max Scheler did influence the young Kurt Schneider. We conclude that Scheler's philosophy of emotion impressed Schneider, and that the latter's notion of 'vital depression' as the core element in melancholia was essentially applied Schelerian philosophy...
September 2016: History of Psychiatry
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