journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Seminars in Immunology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28647227/in-vivo-cellular-reactions-to-different-biomaterials-physiological-and-pathological-aspects-and-their-consequences
#1
REVIEW
Sarah Al-Maawi, Anna Orlowska, Robert Sader, C James Kirkpatrick, Shahram Ghanaati
Biomaterials are widely used in guided bone regeneration (GBR) and guided tissue regeneration (GTR). After application, there is an interaction between the host immune system and the implanted biomaterial, leading to a biomaterial-specific cellular reaction. The present review focuses on cellular reactions to numerous biomaterials in vivo with consideration of different implantation models and microenvironments in different species, such as subcutaneous implantation in mice and rats, a muscle model in goats and a femur model in rabbits...
June 21, 2017: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602713/interplay-between-viruses-and-bacterial-microbiota-in-cancer-development
#2
REVIEW
Dariia Vyshenska, Khiem C Lam, Natalia Shulzhenko, Andrey Morgun
During the last few decades we have become used to the idea that viruses can cause tumors. It is much less thought of and discussed, however, that most people infected with oncoviruses will never develop cancer. Therefore, the genetic and environmental factors that tips the scales from clearance of viral infection to development of cancer is currently an area of active investigation. Microbiota has recently emerged as a potentially critical factor that would affect this balance by increasing or decreasing the ability of viral infection to promote carcinogenesis...
June 8, 2017: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28583764/proteomic-composition-and-immunomodulatory-properties-of-urinary-bladder-matrix-scaffolds-in-homeostasis-and-injury
#3
REVIEW
Kaitlyn Sadtler, Sven D Sommerfeld, Matthew T Wolf, Xiaokun Wang, Shoumyo Majumdar, Liam Chung, Dhanashree S Kelkar, Akhilesh Pandey, Jennifer H Elisseeff
Urinary bladder matrix (UBM) is used clinically for management of wounds and reinforcement of surgical soft tissue repair, among other applications. UBM consists of the lamina propria and basal lamina of the porcine urinary bladder, and is decellularized as part of the process to manufacture the medical device. UBM is composed mainly of Collagen I, but also contains a wide variety of fibrillar and basement membrane collagens, glycoproteins, proteoglycans and ECM-associated factors. Upon application of the biomaterial in a traumatic or non-traumatic setting in a mouse model, there is a cascade of immune cells that respond to the damaged tissue and biomaterial...
June 2, 2017: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28539184/effects-of-age-related-shifts-in-cellular-function-and-local-microenvironment-upon-the-innate-immune-response-to-implants
#4
REVIEW
Bryan N Brown, Martin J Haschak, Samuel T Lopresti, Elizabeth C Stahl
The host macrophage response is now well recognized as a predictor of the success or failure of biomaterial implants following placement. More specifically, shifts from an "M1" pro-inflammatory towards a more "M2-like" anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization profile have been shown to result in enhanced material integration and/or tissue regeneration downstream. As a result, a number of biomaterials-based approaches to controlling macrophage polarization have been developed. However, the ability to promote such activity is predicated upon an in-depth, context-dependent understanding of the host response to biomaterials...
May 20, 2017: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28487131/dendritic-cells-in-the-host-response-to-implanted-materials
#5
REVIEW
Benjamin G Keselowsky, Jamal S Lewis
The role of dendritic cells (DCs) and their targeted manipulation in the body's response to implanted materials is an important and developing area of investigation, and a large component of the emerging field of biomaterials-based immune engineering. The key position of DCs in the immune system, serving to bridge innate and adaptive immunity, is facilitated by rich diversity in type and function and places DCs as a critical mediator to biomaterials of both synthetic and natural origins. This review presents current views regarding DC biology and summarizes recent findings in DC responses to implanted biomaterials...
May 6, 2017: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28465070/microbiome-and-colorectal-cancer-unraveling-host-microbiota-interactions-in-colitis-associated-colorectal-cancer-development
#6
REVIEW
Mingsong Kang, Alberto Martin
Dysbiosis of gut microbiota occurs in many human chronic immune-mediated diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). Reciprocally, uncontrolled immune responses, that may or may not be induced by dysbiosis, are central to the development of IBD and CAC. There has been a surge of interest in investigating the relationship between microbiota, inflammation and CAC. In this review, we discuss recent findings related to gut microbiota and chronic immune-mediated diseases, such as IBD and CAC...
April 29, 2017: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28431920/the-microbiome-in-anti-cancer-therapy
#7
REVIEW
Stavros Bashiardes, Timur Tuganbaev, Sara Federici, Eran Elinav
The commensal microbiome constitutes an important modulator of host physiology and risk of disease, including cancer development and progression. Lately, the microbiome has been suggested to modulate the efficacy of anti-cancer treatment. Examples include chemotherapy and total body irradiation-induced barrier function disruption, leading to microbial efflux that drives activation of anti-tumorigenic T cells; Microbiome-driven release of reactive oxygen species contributing to the efficacy of platinum salts; and microbiome-induced immune priming promoting the anti-tumor effects of alkylating chemotherapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors...
April 18, 2017: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28431919/influence-of-scaffold-design-on-host-immune-and-stem-cell-responses
#8
REVIEW
Ashwin Nair, Liping Tang
The combined culture of isolated stem cells in tissue engineering scaffolds represents a popular strategy for the regeneration of specialized tissues. Despite of improved outcomes in some tissues, this stem cell-seeded tissue engineering strategy has not led to significant tissue regeneration as expected. The lower-than-expected outcome may be caused by overwhelming immune responses to scaffold materials and poor survival of seeded stem cells following implantation. This review is aimed at summarizing the success and failure of this strategy and also shedding some light on new directions to design scaffolds for promoting regenerative responses via autologous stem cells...
April 18, 2017: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28274693/the-host-response-to-naturally-derived-extracellular-matrix-biomaterials
#9
REVIEW
Aaron H Morris, D K Stamer, T R Kyriakides
Biomaterials based on natural materials including decellularized tissues and tissue-derived hydrogels are becoming more widely used for clinical applications. Because of their native composition and structure, these biomaterials induce a distinct form of the foreign body response that differs from that of non-native biomaterials. Differences include direct interactions with cells via preserved moieties as well as the ability to undergo remodeling. Moreover, these biomaterials could elicit adaptive immune responses due to the presence of modified native molecules...
March 5, 2017: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214177/dendritic-cells-in-host-response-to-biologic-scaffolds
#10
REVIEW
Cynthia A Leifer
Tissue regeneration and repair require a highly complex and orchestrated series of events that require inflammation, but can be compromised when inflammation is excessive or becomes chronic. Macrophages are one of the first cells to contact and respond to implanted materials, and mediate the inflammatory response. The series of events following macrophage association with biomaterials has been well-studied. Dendritic cells (DCs) also directly interact with biomaterials, are critical for specific immune responses, and can be activated in response to interactions with biomaterials...
February 14, 2017: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27964804/the-versatile-platelet-contributes-to-inflammation-infection-hemostasis-coagulation-and-cancer
#11
EDITORIAL
Paul Kubes
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27881292/innate-immunity-hemostasis-and-matrix-remodeling-ptx3-as-a-link
#12
REVIEW
Andrea Doni, Cecilia Garlanda, Alberto Mantovani
Innate immunity is evolutionarily connected with hemostasis. PTX3 is an essential fluid-phase pattern recognition molecule of the innate immune system that acts as a functional ancestor of antibodies. PTX3 by interacting with defense collagens and fibrinogens amplifies effector functions of the innate immune system. At wound sites, PTX3 regulates the injury-induced thrombotic response and promotes wound healing by favoring timely fibrinolysis. Therefore, PTX3 interacts with ancestral domains conserved in innate immunity, hemostasis and extracellular matrix and exerts functions related to both antimicrobial resistance and tissue repair...
December 2016: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27876233/role-of-platelets-in-neutrophil-extracellular-trap-net-production-and-tissue-injury
#13
REVIEW
Seok-Joo Kim, Craig N Jenne
In addition to their well-known role as the cellular mediator of thrombosis, numerous studies have identified key roles for platelets during various disease processes. Importantly, platelets play a critical role in the host immune response, directly interacting with, and eliminating pathogens, from the blood stream. In addition to pathogen clearance, platelets also contribute to leukocyte recruitment at sites of infection and inflammation, and modulate leukocyte activity. Platelet interaction with activated neutrophils is a potent inducer of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET)...
December 2016: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27876232/hypercoagulation-and-complement-connected-players-in-tumor-development-and-metastases
#14
REVIEW
Silvia Guglietta, Maria Rescigno
Hypercoagulation is a common feature of several tumors to the extent that individuals with coagulation defects often present with occult visceral cancers. Recent evidence has shown that hypercoagulation is not just a mere secondary effect due to the presence of the tumor, rather it actively contributes to tumor development and dissemination. Among the numerous mechanisms that can contribute to cancer-associated hypercoagulation, the ones involving immune-mediated processes are gaining increasing attention. In particular, complement cascade and hypercoagulation are one inducing the other in a vicious circle that involves neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) formation...
December 2016: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27866916/blood-coagulation-in-immunothrombosis-at-the-frontline-of-intravascular-immunity
#15
REVIEW
Florian Gaertner, Steffen Massberg
While hemostasis is the physiological process that prevents blood loss after vessel injury, thrombosis is often portrayed as a pathologic event involving blood coagulation and platelet aggregation eventually leading to vascular occlusion and tissue damage. However, recent work suggests that thrombosis can also be a physiological process, termed immunothrombosis, initiated by the innate immune system providing a first line of defense to locally control infection. Fibrin forms the structural basis of immunothrombotic clots and its assembly involves the concerted action of coagulation factors, platelets and leukocytes...
December 2016: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27802906/platelet-mediated-modulation-of-adaptive-immunity
#16
REVIEW
Matteo Iannacone
Besides being the main cellular effectors of hemostasis, platelets possess a plethora of intracellular mediators (e.g. cytokines, chemokines and antimicrobial molecules) as well as surface receptors (e.g. P-selectin, integrins, CD40L, intercellular adhesion molecule [ICAM]-2, junctional adhesion molecule [JAM]-A, CD44, Toll-like receptors, chemokine receptors) known for their involvement in inflammatory and immune responses. These aspects of platelet biology, which suggest an evolutionary link to a more primitive multifunctional innate defensive cell, position platelets at the interface between coagulation and immunity...
December 2016: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27769639/platelets-and-infection
#17
REVIEW
Carsten Deppermann, Paul Kubes
The primary function of platelets is to patrol the vasculature and seal vessel breaches to limit blood loss. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that they also contribute to pathophysiological conditions like thrombosis, atherosclerosis, stroke and infection. Severe sepsis is a devastating disease that claims hundreds of thousands of lives every year in North America and is a major burden to the public health system. Platelet surface receptors like GPIb, αIIbβ3, TLR2 and TLR4 are involved in direct platelet-bacteria interactions...
December 2016: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28340958/metabolism-and-acetylation-in-innate-immune-cell-function-and-fate
#18
REVIEW
Alanna M Cameron, Simon J Lawless, Edward J Pearce
Innate immunity is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Changes in both metabolism and chromatin accessibility contribute to the shaping of these innate immune responses, and we are beginning to appreciate that cross-talk between these two systems plays an important role in determining innate immune cell differentiation and function. In this review we focus on acetylation, a post-translational modification important for both regulating chromatin accessibility by modulating histone function, and for functional regulation of non-histone proteins, which has many links to both immune signaling and metabolism...
October 2016: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27938849/preface
#19
EDITORIAL
Anne F McGettrick, Luke A J O'Neill
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Seminars in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27884543/immunometabolism-is-it-under-the-eye-of-the-clock
#20
REVIEW
James O Early, Anne M Curtis
Molecular clocks allow an organism to track time of day, providing the means to anticipate and respond to the daily changes within the environment. In mammals the molecular clock consists of a network of proteins that form auto-regulatory feedback loops that drive rhythms in physiology and behavior. In recent times the extent to which the molecular clock controls key metabolic and immune pathways has begun to emerge. For example, the main clock protein BMAL1 has been linked to mitochondrial metabolism, mitochondrial dynamics and various host defense pathways...
October 2016: Seminars in Immunology
journal
journal
30475
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"