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Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29622317/-unknown-title
#1
EDITORIAL
David W Todd, Robert C Bosack
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29622315/anesthetic-pump-techniques-versus-the-intermittent-bolus-what-the-oral-surgeon-needs-to-know
#2
REVIEW
Richard C Robert, Chirag M Patel
The most popular agents in use for office-based anesthesia are propofol, ketamine, and remifentanil, which have the desirable properties of rapid onset and short duration of action. A useful parameter in assessing these agents is the context-sensitive half-time. These anesthetic agents demonstrate relatively low, flat plots compared with older agents. For delivery of intravenous anesthetics, oral and maxillofacial surgeons have relied small incremental boluses with great success. However, relatively simple syringe infusion pumps can provide an even "smoother" anesthetic...
May 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29622314/airway-management-for-the-oral-surgery-patient
#3
REVIEW
Allan Schwartz
This article discusses anesthesia assessment concepts related to airway evaluation and airway maintenance for safe and reliable selection of either open system (entrainment of room air) or closed system (no entrainment of room air) airway devices, which can be used during office-based oral surgical procedures, depending on the needs of a patient. Dental facial and oral structures are integral to an anesthetist's preoperative patient evaluation prior to surgery. The preoperative medical history and physical examination as well as the nature of the oral surgical procedure affect the selection of a proper and safe airway device...
May 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29622313/the-american-association-of-oral-and-maxillofacial-surgeons-simulation-program
#4
REVIEW
David W Todd, John J Schaefer
Patient safety in dental anesthesia has been called into question in recent years. Simulation training has been proposed and developed as one possibility for increasing preparedness and training in cases of adverse events in dental anesthesia. This article presents an overview of the challenges of patient safety in dental anesthesia and how to address them with simulation training. The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons simulation program is unique in its potential to become a standardized, validated competency course with objective grading criteria, mastery-based cooperative learning model, and low facilitator-to-participant ratio, leading to a practical delivery cost structure...
May 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29622312/oral-surgery-patient-safety-concepts-in-anesthesia
#5
REVIEW
Richard C Robert, Chirag M Patel
An effective office emergency preparedness plan for the oral and maxillofacial surgery office can be developed through the use of well-designed checklists, cognitive aids, and regularly scheduled in situ simulations with debriefings. In order to achieve this goal, the hierarchal culture of medicine and dentistry must be overcome, and an inclusive team concept embraced by all members of the staff. Technologic advancements in office automation now make it possible to create interactive cognitive aids. These enhance office emergency training and provide a means for more rapid retrieval of essential information and guidance during both simulations and a real crisis...
May 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29622311/anesthesia-for-the-pediatric-oral-and-maxillofacial-surgery-patient
#6
REVIEW
Deepak G Krishnan
Pediatric patients present to the oral and maxillofacial surgeon for surgical services that can be performed safely and efficiently. Children and parents tend to be anxious; achieving cooperation is paramount for successful procedures. Several techniques can be used to alleviate anxiety and provide analgesia and anesthesia. This article outlines the anatomy and physiology of children and the preoperative anesthetic preparation and techniques unique to pediatric anesthesia. It discusses standards in training in pediatric anesthesia and current recommendations for monitoring...
May 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29622310/the-failed-sedation-solutions-for-the-oral-and-maxillofacial-surgeon
#7
REVIEW
Robert C Bosack
Due to wide variation in patient responses, both intended and adverse, it is impossible to successfully sedate all patients. Choosing the right drug and dose regimen can be challenging, especially in patients who are naïve to anesthesia. Underdosing can lead to pain perception, patient movement and combativeness, awareness with recall, and the sympathetic neuroendocrine stress response. Overdosing can lead to unintended loss of upper airway tone, hypoventilation/apnea, adverse cardiovascular changes, and prolonged sedation (with its attendant problems)...
May 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29622309/anesthetic-agents-commonly-used-by-oral-and-maxillofacial-surgeons
#8
REVIEW
Kyle J Kramer, Jason W Brady
Oral and maxillofacial surgeons have a variety of anesthetic agents that can be used to provide anesthesia safely and efficiently in the office-based environment. However, it is critical to have a thorough understanding of the particulars for each agent. Commonly used anesthetic agents, administered either individually or in combination, include diazepam, midazolam, propofol, ketamine, opioid agonists such as fentanyl or remifentanil, dexmedetomidine, and inhalational agents, including nitrous oxide and sevoflurane...
May 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29622308/oral-and-maxillofacial-surgery-team-anesthesia-model-and-anesthesia-assistant-training
#9
REVIEW
Stephanie J Drew
The model for oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) delivery of office-based, open airway anesthesia has morphed from the operator-anesthetist to the delivery of team anesthesia, supporting a widespread focus on organizational aspects of the delivery of care. The training, continuing education, and coordination of a diverse anesthesia team provides a system to improve the safety and efficacy of anesthesia delivery. The hallmarks of this system include communication, checks and balances, monitoring, team dynamics, protocols, emergency scenario preparation and rehearsal, and crisis resource management during an emergent situation...
May 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29622307/preoperative-evaluation-and-patient-selection-for-office-based-oral-surgery-anesthesia
#10
REVIEW
Stuart Lieblich
Provision of an outpatient anesthetic requires careful review of the patient's medical history along with salient aspects of the physical examination. The oral and maxillofacial surgeon may need to consult with the patient's medical providers to gain an understanding of the patient's potential risks for an adverse event. This article reviews key aspects of the patient evaluation so that an informed determination of suitability for an office anesthetic can be made.
May 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29622306/are-you-ready-for-emergency-medical-services-in-your-oral-and-maxillofacial-surgery-office
#11
REVIEW
Clive Rayner, Michael R Ragan
Efficient responses to emergencies in the oral and maxillofacial surgery office require preparation, communication, and thorough documentation of the event and response. The concept of team anesthesia is showcased with these efforts. Emergency medical services training and response times vary greatly. The oral and maxillofacial surgery office should be prepared to manage the patient for at least 15 minutes after making the call to 911. Patient outcomes are optimized when providers work together to manage and transport the patient...
May 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153242/erratum
#12
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153241/treatment-of-the-temporomandibular-joint-in-a-child-with-juvenile-idiopathic-arthritis
#13
REVIEW
Eric J Granquist
The oral and maxillofacial surgeon is instrumental in the management and care of pediatric patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and should include JIA in the differential when evaluating pediatric patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction. Medical management has largely decreased the need for surgical intervention, but these patients may require intraarticular steroid injections of the TMJ, close follow-up to monitor their facial growth, and management of the subsequent postinflammatory degenerative TMJ changes...
February 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153240/acquired-abnormalities-of-the-temporomandibular-joint
#14
REVIEW
Anne-Frédérique Chouinard, Leonard B Kaban, Zachary S Peacock
Mandibular growth is a complex process that involves the "functional matrix," an interaction of the muscles of mastication, occlusion, and jaw function. Although not a typical growth center, the mandibular condyle has a significant effect on the ultimate size, shape and function of the mandible and secondarily on overall facial form. Acquired temporomandibular joint (TMJ)/condylar abnormalities, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis, idiopathic condylar resorption, TMJ ankylosis, and condylar hyperplasia, often result in facial deformity and functional deficits...
February 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153239/congenital-abnormalities-of-the-temporomandibular-joint
#15
REVIEW
Christopher J Galea, Jason E Dashow, Jennifer E Woerner
Congenital deformities of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) complex can present as a heterogeneous continuum of growth disturbances of the mandibular condyle, articular eminence, and temporal bone. This article describes several syndromes with congenital condylar deformity, including mandibulofacial dysostosis (Treacher Collins syndrome), hemifacial microsomia, oculoauriculovertebral syndrome, oculomandibulodyscephaly (Hallermann-Streiff syndrome), and Nager syndrome. Variations in the extent of TMJ deficiency seen in each individual case influence the timing and techniques of TMJ reconstruction...
February 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153238/pediatric-tumors-of-the-temporomandibular-joint
#16
REVIEW
Gary F Bouloux, Steven M Roser, Shelly Abramowicz
The incidence of tumors and pseudotumors of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the pediatric population is low. They are often challenging to recognize unless associated with signs and symptoms that may erroneously be interpreted as TMJ dysfunction. Tumors of the TMJ can be divided into 3 categories based on the nature and type of precursor cell involved in the tumor: benign tumors, malignant tumors, and pseudotumors. This article discusses the most common entities in these categories.
February 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153237/trauma-to-the-pediatric-temporomandibular-joint
#17
REVIEW
Sam S Bae, Sharon Aronovich
Management of pediatric condylar fractures presents a unique challenge because the developing mandible provides limited available bone for fixation and primary teeth preclude the use of typical closed reduction techniques. The available literature is reviewed with regard to closed and open treatment approaches.
February 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153236/nonsurgical-management-of-pediatric-temporomandibular-joint-dysfunction
#18
REVIEW
Steven John Scrivani, Shehryar Nasir Khawaja, Paula Furlan Bavia
Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a subgroup of craniofacial pain problems involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory muscles, and associated head and neck musculoskeletal structures. These disorders are subclassified into TMJ articular disorders and masticatory muscle disorders. Patients with TMD most commonly present with pain, restricted or asymmetric mandibular motion, and TMJ sounds during mandibular movements. The prevalence tends to increase with age. Management of TMJ articular disorders consists of a combination of patient education, home-care plan, biobehavioral therapy, physical therapy, orthotic jaw appliance therapy, pharmacotherapy, and/or surgery...
February 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153235/imaging-of-the-pediatric-temporomandibular-joint
#19
REVIEW
Matthew R Hammer, Yassine Kanaan
Imaging of the temporomandibular joint in pediatric patients is a critical component in the evaluation and treatment of children with temporomandibular joint symptoms. MRI can provide detailed joint anatomy and identify inflammation, sometimes before symptom onset. Ultrasound scan is a convenient emerging modality to evaluate the joint and guide therapeutic injections. Radiography and computed tomography offer osseous detail to recognize early morphologic changes of the mandibular condyle and provide operative planning...
February 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29153234/evaluation-of-pain-syndromes-headache-and-temporomandibular-joint-disorders-in-children
#20
REVIEW
Bruce B Horswell, Jason Sheikh
After a thorough review of the history and presentation of a child's facial pain, a targeted head and neck examination is critical to the appropriate diagnosis of facial pain and temporomandibular joint disorders. It is critical to distinguish between the structural (trauma, degenerative disease, and tumor) and nonstructural (neurogenic, myogenic, and psychological) causes of pain, which will allow for incorporation of appropriate strategies of medical, psychological, dental, and surgical therapies.
February 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
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