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Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30173903/physical-rehabilitation-and-occupational-therapy
#1
REVIEW
Lauren C Capozzi, Naomi D Dolgoy, Margaret L McNeely
Head and neck cancer and associated treatments can have debilitating effects on patient physical function and quality of life. The American Cancer Society's Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines recommend that all patients receive an assessment after their treatment to address complications that may impact long-term recovery and function. Evidence supports the role of physical activity, exercise, physical therapy, and occupational therapy to decrease symptom burden after treatment and improve strength, endurance, and function...
August 30, 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30173902/nutrition-and-perioperative-care-for-the-patient-with-head-and-neck-cancer
#2
REVIEW
Amarbir Gill, Donald Gregory Farwell, Michael G Moore
Recovery after major head and neck cancer surgery is a complex process. In addition to perioperative sequelae such as pain, wound infections, venous thromboembolism (VTE), and pneumonia, these patients frequently suffer from malnutrition. We provide a contemporary evidence-based approach to common aspects of perioperative care to guide the clinician in the optimal management of patients. Particular emphasis is placed on the preoperative education of patients and the identification and management of malnutrition around the time of surgery...
August 30, 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30173901/multidisciplinary-team-planning-for-patients-with-head-and-neck-cancer
#3
REVIEW
Thomas D Shellenberger, Randal S Weber
The multidisciplinary team planning conference is critical in the evaluation and management of patients with head and neck cancer. The management is complex and dictates the care of a multidisciplinary team for optimal results. First, the head and neck multidisciplinary team ensures the complete evaluation of patients before beginning treatment. Second, the team improves the accuracy of diagnosis and staging on which to base the most appropriate treatment. Third, the team improves the outcomes of treatment by appealing to the best available evidence, by following clinical practice guidelines and treatment algorithms, and by engaging in clinical research trials...
August 30, 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30173900/oral-assessment-and-management-of-the-head-and-neck-cancer-patient
#4
REVIEW
Herve Y Sroussi, Maryam Jessri, Joel Epstein
Patients undergoing treatment of head and neck cancer risk developing significant acute and chronic changes that affect the hard and soft tissue of the oral cavity and the head and neck region. This article discusses considerations and recommendations for patients before, during, and after treatment of head and neck cancer. The objective of these recommendations is to maintain oral health, compensate for treatment- and disease-associated morbidities, and improve quality of life. To achieve this objective, treatment of head and neck cancer must include an oral evaluation and management plan well-integrated within the overall oncologic treatment plan from the initiation of therapy...
August 30, 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30143307/imaging-of-patients-with-head-and-neck-cancer-from-staging-to-surveillance
#5
REVIEW
Daniel P Seeburg, Aaron H Baer, Nafi Aygun
In this review, the authors summarize the latest imaging methods and recommendations for each of the various steps in managing patients with head and neck cancer, from staging of disease to posttreatment surveillance. Because staging of head and neck cancers is different for various subsites of the head and neck, imaging is discussed separately for each. A separate discussion of imaging of perineural spread, occult primary tumors, and lymph nodes is followed by a discussion of paradigms for surveillance imaging in the posttreatment neck...
August 22, 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30078696/epidemiology-and-demographics-of-the-head-and-neck-cancer-population
#6
REVIEW
Natasha Cohen, Stacey Fedewa, Amy Y Chen
Head and neck malignancies comprise a heterogeneous group of malignancies that cause significant morbidity to those affected. These malignancies are associated with specific risk factors and exposures, some of which impact prognosis. The most common risk factors for developing head and neck cancers are tobacco and alcohol use. Marijuana and e-cigarettes, occupational exposures, and use of topical substances have also been linked to head and neck cancers. Human papilloma virus has been associated with oropharyngeal cancer...
August 2, 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30008346/current-controversies-in-the-management-of-temporomandibular-disorders
#7
EDITORIAL
Daniel M Laskin, Shravan Kumar Renapurkar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30008345/introduction
#8
EDITORIAL
Rui P Fernandes
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30008344/surgical-management-of-idiopathic-condylar-resorption-orthognathic-surgery-versus-temporomandibular-total-joint-replacement
#9
REVIEW
Radhika Chigurupati, Pushkar Mehra
Young females with retruded and hyperdivergent mandibles, class II openbite malocclusions, and steep occlusal planes with or without TMJ symptoms are at higher risk for Idiopathic Condylar Resorption (ICR). Such patients undergoing orthodontic and /or surgical treatment should be informed of possible relapse due to ICR. Orthognathic Surgery with Total joint replacement or Orthognathic surgery alone may both be acceptable options for management of the facial deformity and the malocclusion that ensues from ICR...
August 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30008343/costochondral-graft-versus-total-alloplastic-joint-for-temporomandibular-joint-reconstruction
#10
REVIEW
Louis G Mercuri
Presently, there are 2 options for the replacement of the temporomandibular joint for end-stage pathology: autogenous bone grafting or alloplastic joint replacement. This article presents evidence-based advantages and disadvantages for each of these management options to assist both surgeons and their patients in making that choice.
August 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30008342/surgical-versus-nonsurgical-management-of-degenerative-joint-disease
#11
REVIEW
Shravan Kumar Renapurkar
As knowledge of the complexity of myofascial pain and its interaction with temporomandibular joint disorders has increased, the use of surgical procedures to treat degenerative joint disease has decreased. The focus has moved from a "surgery-first" approach toward a more cautious one that involves nonsurgical treatment as the primary modality, then minimally invasive treatments, followed by open surgical modalities, when indicated. This article examines the current literature regarding the effectiveness of nonsurgical and surgical treatments for the management of degenerative joint disease...
August 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30008341/the-use-of-botulinum-toxin-for-the-treatment-of-myofascial-pain-in-the-masticatory-muscles
#12
REVIEW
Daniel M Laskin
Although the use of botulinum toxin has been recommended for the management of myofascial pain and dysfunction, the precise mechanism of its action remains undetermined and studies on its effectiveness are equivocal. Moreover, even if such treatment may temporarily relieve the symptoms, it does not address the cause of the problem. Also, its use is not free of potential complications. On this basis, botulinum toxin does not seem to be a logical treatment of myofascial pain and dysfunction.
August 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30008340/the-efficacy-of-pharmacologic-treatment-of-temporomandibular-disorders
#13
REVIEW
Gary M Heir
This is not a pharmacopeia offering directions for choosing the proper pain medication for treating temporomandibular disorders. Rather, the appropriate decision depends on proper diagnosis, an understanding of the pain mechanisms involved, and the different targets for analgesic action. This article discusses these issues and evaluates the various drugs involved. It also describes potential reasons for therapeutic failure.
August 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29885876/discectomy-versus-disc-preservation-for-internal-derangement-of-the-temporomandibular-joint
#14
REVIEW
Shravan Kumar Renapurkar
Anterior disc displacement with or without reduction is a common finding in symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. When symptomatic and associated with dysfunction it requires an intervention. Once nonsurgical management fails and the patient does not respond to minimally invasive procedures, open surgical treatment is indicated. However, controversy exists about whether disc-preservation procedures, such as repositioning/repairing or disc removal, is the preferred treatment. This article evaluates the current evidence supporting both treatment options and highlights the indications, contraindications, and consequences of each...
August 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29866455/combined-or-staged-temporomandibular-joint-and-orthognathic-surgery-for-patients-with-internal-derangement-and-dentofacial-deformities
#15
REVIEW
Somi Kim, David A Keith
Patients with internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint and dentofacial deformities need appropriate evaluation for both conditions. Correct diagnosis of internal derangement is vital in determining the correct orthognathic surgery plan, and it is particularly important to differentiate between myofascial dysfunction and intra-articular joint problems. Depending on the stage of internal derangement, patients may need treatment for temporomandibular dysfunction symptomatically, staged, or concurrently with orthognathic surgery...
August 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29866454/the-role-of-stress-in-the-etiology-of-oral-parafunction-and-myofascial-pain
#16
REVIEW
Richard Ohrbach, Ambra Michelotti
Oral parafunction during waking comprises possible behaviors that can be measured with a comprehensive checklist or behavioral monitoring. Multiple studies lead to largely consistent findings: stressful states can trigger parafunctional episodes that contribute to myofascial pain. However, this simple causal pathway coexists with at least 3 other pathways: anxiety and stress are potent direct contributors to pain, pain results in maladaptive behaviors such as parafunction, and parafunction may be a coping response to potential threat coupled with hypervigilance and somatosensory amplification...
August 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29866453/malocclusion-as-a-cause-for-temporomandibular-disorders-and-orthodontics-as-a-treatment
#17
REVIEW
Bhavna Shroff
This article explores the long-standing controversy between orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). It reviews the history of this controversy and presents a discussion of the current literature concerning the potential role of malocclusion in the onset of TMDs. It also explores the potential role of orthodontic treatment as a possible cure for TMDs and concludes, based on the most current evidence-based literature, that there is no relationship.
August 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29866452/arthroscopy-versus-arthrocentesis-for-treating-internal-derangements-of-the-temporomandibular-joint
#18
REVIEW
Daniel M Laskin
The introduction of arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint represented a major change in the management of internal derangements and to the realization that re-establishing joint mobility by arthroscopic lysis and lavage was as effective as surgically restoring disc position. It was subsequently shown that such treatment could be done without joint visualization. This raised the question of whether the inability to visualize the joint and perform other surgical manipulations limited its usefulness. A comparison of the literature shows that although their effectiveness is essentially the same, arthrocentesis is simpler, has less morbidity, and has fewer complications than arthroscopic surgery...
August 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29866451/orthognathic-surgery-as-a-treatment-for-temporomandibular-disorders
#19
REVIEW
M Franklin Dolwick, Charles G Widmer
Well-controlled clinical trials supporting orthognathic surgery as the primary management for temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are lacking. Most published studies lack an adequate experimental design to minimize biases. Studies that did minimize some biases do support an overall reduction in the frequency of TMD signs and symptoms in some Class III and Class II patients who had orthognathic surgery. However, Class II correction with counter-clockwise rotation of the mandible increased TMD. Individual variability precludes the ability to predict TMD outcome after surgery...
August 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29866450/the-role-of-imaging-in-the-diagnosis-of-temporomandibular-joint-pathology
#20
REVIEW
Tore A Larheim, Caroline Hol, Margareth Kristensen Ottersen, Bjørn B Mork-Knutsen, Linda Z Arvidsson
Diagnostic imaging is sometimes necessary to supplement the clinical findings in patients with suspected temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). However, the interpretation of pathology in the imaging findings is often complicated by the presence of similar findings in asymptomatic volunteers, as well as by the use of inadequate imaging techniques and poor image quality. This article focuses on these issues and gives guidance on the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging in patients with suspected TMD.
August 2018: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
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