journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29046237/pediatric-temporomandibular-joint-disorders
#1
EDITORIAL
Shelly Abramowicz
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 15, 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28987233/controversies-in-oral-and-maxillofacial-surgery
#2
EDITORIAL
Luis G Vega, Daniel J Meara
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28987232/controversies-in-implant-surgery
#3
REVIEW
Tara L Aghaloo, Martin Mardirosian, Brando Delgado
Dental implants are a mainstream treatment protocol to replace missing teeth. Patient and clinician demands have led to shorter length and narrower diameter implants, immediately placed implants into infected sites, and the use of implants in children. This article reviews some of the controversial topics in implant dentistry, and presents the evidence that supports and challenges these newer techniques. Because long-term studies are often not available, especially for implants in infected sites, mini implants, and implants in the growing patient, the field continues to evolve...
November 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28987231/controversies-in-anesthesia-for-oral-and-maxillofacial-surgery
#4
REVIEW
Brett J King, Adam Levine
The future of office-based anesthesia for oral and maxillofacial surgery is at risk. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons have been on the forefront of providing safe and effective outpatient anesthesia for decades. Recent changes in Medicare policies have had, and will continue to have, a significant effect on the training of oral and maxillofacial surgery residents regarding anesthesia. The outcome of these changes can have a major effect on the specialty of oral and maxillofacial surgery and a cornerstone of the profession...
November 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28987230/controversies-in-obstructive-sleep-apnea-surgery
#5
REVIEW
Carolyn C Dicus Brookes, Scott B Boyd
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common chronic disease characterized by repetitive pharyngeal collapse during sleep. OSA is associated with cardiovascular disease and increased mortality, among other issues. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is considered first line therapy for OSA, but is not always tolerated. Both non-surgical and surgical alternative management strategies are available for the CPAP intolerant patient. This article explores controversies surrounding airway evaluation, definition of successful treatment, and surgical management of the CPAP intolerant patient with moderate to severe OSA...
November 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28987229/controversies-in-oral-and-maxillofacial-oncology
#6
REVIEW
Jacob G Yetzer
Imaging studies are essential components of tumor diagnosis, staging, assessing tumor response to neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies, and postoperative surveillance on completion of definitive treatment. Treatment of early stage clinically node negative oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma is controversial. Approximately 3% of all head and neck tumors arise within the parotid gland and most often within the superficial lobe, lateral to the facial nerve; about 80% are benign and most are pleomorphic adenoma. In patients with dry eyes failing multiple other treatment modalities and facing ongoing pain and loss of vision, microvascular transplant of the submandibular gland is a viable option...
November 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28987228/current-controversies-in-metopic-suture-craniosynostosis
#7
REVIEW
Michael S Jaskolka
Metopic craniosynostosis is being reported with an increasing incidence and is now the second most common type of isolated suture craniosynostosis. Numerous areas of controversy exist in the work-up and management, including defining the diagnosis in the less severe phenotype, the association with neurodevelopmental delay, the impact of surgical treatment, and the applicability of various techniques and their timing on outcomes.
November 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28987227/controversies-in-facial-cosmetic-surgery
#8
REVIEW
Armando Retana
Facial cosmetic surgery techniques are constantly updated to meet the expectations of patients who demand less invasive procedures and less recovery time. Current trends in lower eyelid surgery call for periorbital fat repositioning instead of excision of fat. Controversies still exist in chin augmentations regarding osseous genioplasty versus alloplastic chin implant. The benefits, disadvantages, and considerations of these procedures are discussed.
November 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28987226/controversies-in-orthognathic-surgery
#9
REVIEW
Daniel E Perez, Aaron Liddell
Controversy has accompanied orthognathic surgery since its adaptation for the correction of dentofacial deformities. With the development of less invasive and less morbid osteotomy designs, questions regarding overall osteotomy stability have abounded. The transition from prolonged intermaxillary fixation and wire osteosynthesis to rigid internal fixation has spurred questions regarding the most effective fixation technique, and challenged previously accepted hierarchies of stability. These questions represent only the surface of a sea of debate and discussion, as measures have been taken to optimize patient outcome, minimize patient morbidity, and maximize operating room productivity...
November 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28987225/controversies-in-microvascular-maxillofacial-reconstruction
#10
REVIEW
Adam P Fagin, Daniel Petrisor
The effectiveness and reliability of microvascular reconstruction for large defects in the head and neck is no longer disputed. However, many controversies still persist in the ideal perioperative management of patients undergoing free tissue transfer. The optimal method of postoperative monitoring, the use of vasoconstrictors in the perioperative period, and the use of anticoagulants in the postoperative period remain topics of debate. This article offers recommendations on each of these controversies based on a review of the current literature...
November 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28987224/controversies-in-traditional-oral-and-maxillofacial-reconstruction
#11
REVIEW
John S Vorrasi, Antonia Kolokythas
Traditional reconstruction of the head and neck and significantly evolved over the last 20 to 30 years with advances in microvascular surgery, biologic materials such as bone morphogenic protein, and dental implant predictability. Earlier and more definitive reconstruction can now be achieved with combining therapies, allowing patients immediate restoration of function and improved cosmetics. Antiresorptive medications, such as Denosumab and bisphosphonates, have complicated bony reconstruction treatments with altered biology and less-predictable results...
November 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28987223/controversies-in-maxillofacial-trauma
#12
REVIEW
Daniel J Meara, Lewis C Jones
Craniomaxillofacial trauma management has continued to improve and evolve as a result of advances in technology and scientific inquiry. Controversies exist where there is little evidence-based literature to guide treatment in frontal sinus management, rigid versus absorbable fixation, open versus closed treatment of mandibular condyle fractures, extraction of teeth in the line of fracture, optimal timing for repair of mandible fractures, antibiotic use for facial wounds and fractures, and reconstructive materials in orbital fracture reconstruction...
November 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28987222/controversies-in-dentoalveolar-and-preprosthetic-surgery
#13
REVIEW
Deepak G Krishnan
Dentoalveolar surgeries are among the more common procedures performed by oral maxillofacial surgeons. It is only natural that there are several controversies associated with many aspects of this type of surgery. Although good scientific evidence is the basis of most oral maxillofacial procedures, some of what is accepted as common wisdom may not meet strict guidelines of evidence-based practice. This article explores some controversies that are relevant to the current practice of dentoalveolar surgery.
November 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28893467/controversies-in-oral-and-maxillofacial-pathology
#14
REVIEW
Zachary S Peacock
Several benign pathologic entities that are commonly encountered by the oral and maxillofacial surgeon remain controversial. From etiology to treatment, no consensus exists in the literature regarding the best treatment of benign lesions, such as the keratocystic odontogenic tumor, giant cell lesion, or ameloblastoma. Given the need for often-morbid treatment to prevent recurrence of these lesions, multiple less-invasive treatments exist in the literature for each entity with little agreement. As the molecular and genomic pathogenesis of these lesions are better understood, directed treatments will hopefully lessen the contention in management...
November 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28823889/controversies-in-the-management-of-oral-and-maxillofacial-infections
#15
REVIEW
Daniel Taub, Andrew Yampolsky, Robert Diecidue, Lionel Gold
The management and treatment of odontogenic infection, and its frequent extension into the head and neck, remains an important section of oral and maxillofacial surgical practice. This area of maxillofacial expertise is widely recognized by the medical community and an essential component to the hospital referral system. Although the general principles of infection management have not changed, there have been modifications in the timing of treatment sequences and treatment techniques. These modifications are influenced by the development of diagnostic methods and advances in bacterial genetics and antibiotic usage...
November 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709538/evaluation-of-the-surgical-margin-an-interdisciplinary-approach
#16
EDITORIAL
Joshua E Lubek, Kelly R Magliocca
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709537/introduction
#17
EDITORIAL
Joseph I Helman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709536/margin-analysis-has-free-tissue-transfer-improved-oncologic-outcomes-for-oral-squamous-cell-carcinoma
#18
REVIEW
Sean P Edwards
Microvascular reconstruction of ablative defects has become a mainstay of contemporary management of head and neck cancer patients. These techniques offer myriad tissue options that vary in character, volume, and components and have vastly improved the esthetic and functional outcomes achieved in this patient population. Although consensus exists regarding the reliability and functional and esthetic benefits of free tissue transfer, the same cannot be said for oncologic outcomes. The increase in resources required for the routine use of free tissue transfer has led to asking this question-Do vascularized free flaps allow for increased surgical margins and improvements in oncologic outcomes?...
August 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709535/surgical-margins-the-perspective-of-pathology
#19
REVIEW
Kelly R Magliocca
Neoplasms of the head and neck constitute a broad spectrum of benign and malignant entities. When treatment involves resection, assessment of the surgical margins represents an important component of the pathologic examination. Margin status is an important indicator of a complete surgical resection. The ability to generalize conclusions such as 'safe distance' measurements from work performed mSCCa or cutaneous malignancy to other types of neoplasms in the head and neck region seems limited. This article reviews conditions and considerations for reliable margin assessment and interpretation...
August 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709534/margin-analysis-sarcoma-of-the-head-and-neck
#20
REVIEW
Raafat F Makary, Arun Gopinath, Michael R Markiewicz, Rui Fernandes
Head and neck sarcomas are rare but are associated with significant morbidity/mortality and management difficulties. These tumors are best managed in a multidisciplinary setting. Open or core biopsy is essential for histologic diagnosis and grading. Complete surgical tumor resection with negative margins at the first attempt is the best chance for potential cure. In most patients, except those with small resectable low-grade lesions, adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy are added to maximize local control with variable results...
August 2017: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
journal
journal
30351
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"