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Journal of Medical Humanities

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28391547/drawing-invisible-wounds-war-comics-and-the-treatment-of-trauma
#1
Joshua M Leone
Since the Vietnam War, graphic novels about war have shifted from simply representing it to portraying avenues for survivors to establish psychological wellness in their lives following traumatic events. While modern diagnostic medicine often looks to science, technology, and medications to treat the psychosomatic damage produced by trauma, my article examines the therapeutic potential of the comics medium with close attention to war comics. Graphic novels draw trauma in a different light: because of the medium's particular combination of words and images in sequence, war comics represent that which is typically unrepresentable, and these books serve as useful tools to promote healing among the psychologically wounded...
April 8, 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28389836/temporal-dissonance-south-african-historians-and-the-post-aids-dilemma
#2
Carla Tsampiras
While foregrounding the historiography of HIV and AIDS in the South African context, this article analyses AIDS as simultaneously existing in three spheres: first, virtually - as the subject matter of electronically measurable research; second, academically - as a topic of research in the discipline of History; and third, actually - as a complex health concern and signifier that, via the field of Medical and Health Humanities, could allow for new collaborations between historians and others interested in understanding AIDS...
April 7, 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28374285/mono-causal-and-multi-causal-theories-of-disease-how-to-think-virally-and-socially-about-the-aetiology-of-aids
#3
Katherine Furman
In this paper, I utilise the tools of analytic philosophy to amalgamate mono-causal and multi-causal theories of disease. My aim is to better integrate viral and socio-economic explanations of AIDS in particular, and to consider how the perceived divide between mono-causal and multi-causal theories played a role in the tragedy of AIDS denialism in South Africa in the early 2000s. Currently, there is conceptual ambiguity surrounding the relationship between mono-causal and multi-causal theories in biomedicine and epidemiology...
April 4, 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28315040/hiv-stigma-gay-identity-and-caste-untouchability-metaphors-of-abjection-in-my-brother%C3%A2-nikhil-the-boyfriend-and-gandu-bagicha
#4
Shamira A Meghani
In this article I read textual metaphors of 'untouchability' in 'post-AIDS' representation as an erasure of structures that condition HIV stigmatization in India. Throughout, my discussion is contextualised by the political economy of HIV and AIDS, which has been productive of particular modern sexual subjects. In the film My Brother…Nikhil, the stigmatization of Nikhil, a gay Indian man living with HIV, is constituted through visual and verbal caste metaphors, which draw on existing subject positions that are elided as 'traditional', residual, and receding...
March 17, 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28271258/illness-doula-adding-a-new-role-to-healthcare-practice
#5
Annie Robinson, Danielle Spencer, Brad Lewis
In this article, we explore the possibility of adding a new role to the clinical encounter: an illness doula. Even though research and education in medical humanities and narrative medicine have made improvements in humanizing healthcare, progress is slow and ongoing. There needs to be an intervention in the practice of healthcare now for people currently going through the system. An illness doula, like a birth doula, would facilitate and insure that attention is paid to the personal needs and desires of the patient in the present system...
March 7, 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28243819/hiv-and-aids-in-irish-theatre-queer-masculinities-punishment-and-post-aids-culture
#6
Cormac O'Brien
This essay provides a critical survey of key Irish theatre productions that present queer men with HIV or AIDS as a central theme while also seeking to situate several of these productions within the controversial discourse of 'post-AIDS' as it plays out in Irish cultural and social discourses. Through this survey, this essay finds and critically elaborates how a discourse of AIDS as punishment is a common denominator in all of these plays; whether that be as a central metaphor in the drama or conversely as a trope that theatre makers seek to disrupt...
February 27, 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28194547/madness-decolonized-madness-as-transnational-identity-in-gail-hornstein-s-agnes-s-jacket
#7
Gavin Miller
The US psychologist Gail Hornstein's monograph, Agnes's Jacket: A Psychologist's Search for the Meanings of Madness (2009), is an important intervention in the identity politics of the mad movement. Hornstein offers a resignified vision of mad identity that embroiders the central trope of an "anti-colonial" struggle to reclaim the experiential world "colonized" by psychiatry. A series of literal and figurative appeals makes recourse to the inner world and (corresponding) cultural world of the mad as well as to the ethno-symbolic cultural materials of dormant nationhood...
February 13, 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28185147/incompatible-with-care-examining-trisomy-18-medical-discourse-and-families-counter-discourse-for-recuperative-ethos
#8
Megan J Thorvilson, Adam J Copeland
Parents whose child is diagnosed with a serious disease such as trisomy 18 first rely on the medical community for an accurate description and prognosis. In the case of trisomy 18, however, many families are told the disease is "incompatible with life" even though some children with the condition live for several years. This paper considers parents' response to current medical discourse concerning trisomy 18 by examining blogs written by the parents of those diagnosed. Using interpretive humanistic reading and foregrounding Cathryn Molloy's recuperative ethos theory (2015), we find that parents demonstrate recuperative ethos in response to physicians' descriptions of trisomy 18, particularly in rhetoric addressing survival, medicalized language, and religious and/or spiritual rhetoric...
February 10, 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28150222/the-production-of-space-in-richard-selzer-s-wartime-story-the-whistlers-room
#9
Jiena Sun
This essay applies Henri Lefebvre's notion of the production of space, particularly his conceptualization of the tension formed by the perceived-conceived-lived triad to analyze how space is produced in wartime hospitals as demonstrated in Richard Selzer's "The Whistlers' Room." Wounded soldiers participate in producing the triad of the social space of military hospitals through their multilayered performances as fighting soldiers serving the nation and as living human beings longing for human connections. Contradictory performances demonstrate the strategic positioning of wounded soldiers as active producers of different social spaces...
February 2, 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28144899/problematising-the-discourse-of-post-aids
#10
Liz Walker
This paper reflects on the meanings of 'post-AIDS' in the Global North and South. I bring together contemporary arguments to suggest that the notion of 'post-AIDS' is, at best, misplaced, not least because its starting point remains a biotechnical one. Drawing on aspects of the sub-Saharan African experience, this essay suggests that, despite significant shifts in access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV continues to be fundamentally shaped by economic determinants and social and cultural practices. In this essay, I question the certainty of the discourse of (Western biomedical) 'positive progress' (Johnson et al...
February 1, 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28130764/miracle-two-poems
#11
Donald Brunnquell
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 27, 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025754/introduction-caregiving-kinship-and-the-making-of-stories
#12
EDITORIAL
Carol Schilling, Mark Osteen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27924437/disability-life-writing-and-the-problem-of-dependency-in-the-autobiography-of-gaby-brimmer
#13
Rachel Adams
Independence was a core value of the movement for disability rights. People with disabilities did not have to be dependent, advocates claimed; they were robbed of autonomy by poverty, social prejudice, and architectural barriers. Recently, critics have noted that the emphasis on independence equates personhood with autonomy, reason, and self-awareness, thereby excluding those who are incapable of self-determination. The stigma of dependency is communicated to caregivers whose work is devalued and undercompensated...
March 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913922/legacy-1
#14
Tess Hurson-Maginess
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27888382/-say-your-favorite-poet-in-the-world-is-lying-there-eileen-myles-james-schuyler-and-the-queer-intimacies-of-care
#15
Libbie Rifkin
This article closely reads "Chelsea Girls," an autobiographical short story by Eileen Myles that depicts her experience caring for the diabetic, bipolar poet James Schuyler when she was a young writer getting started in East Village in the late 1970s. Their dependency relationship is a form of queer kinship, an early version of the caring relations between lesbians and gay men that HIV/AIDS would demand over the next two decades as chosen families emerged to nurture gay men and lesbians rejected by their families of origin...
March 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27838869/the-gentleman-vanishes-dementia-caretaking-and-the-life-of-the-mind
#16
Michele Taillon Taylor
This essay recounts the author's journey with her father during his prolonged decline due to dementia. The experience pushed her to break out of the confines of conventional scholarly research in her academic field of architectural history to a multi-disciplinary consideration of nineteenth-century environmental, sensory and horticultural therapies for the mentally ill. During her father's illness, she discovered the tangible therapeutic benefits of momentary engagements with his environment through his five senses and through the emotional filter of poetry...
March 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27819114/looking-after-iris-john-bayley-s-elegy-for-the-living
#17
Carol Schilling
John Bayley's Elegy for Iris, his memoir about living with Iris Murdoch after the onset of dementia, unsettles models of mind and agency that ignore human relationship, dependency, and the vulnerabilities of the cared for and the carer. Experiencing Iris as ambiguously absent and present while he attentively cares for her, Bayley frames his memoir as an elegy, a reflection on love and loss that conventionally represents two subjects-the author and the one he lost. Bayley's acts of care and his stories about his wife, both as she was and as she has become, sustain her moral worth as a person...
March 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27771806/the-moonglow-1945
#18
Charles Ethan Paccione
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27761687/bad-mothers-and-monstrous-sons-autistic-adults-lifelong-dependency-and-sensationalized-narratives-of-care
#19
Holly Allen
Sensationalized representations of autistic families in film and other media frequently feature violent encounters between mothers and sons. This essay analyzes two media stories and three films that suggest how limited-and therefore misleading-popular representations of the autism family are. Except for one of the films, these representations blame the problem of adult autistic dependency on either monstrous autism or bad mothering. Doing so elides collective social responsibility for autism care and denies the reality that autistic adults continue to have complex dependency needs that families cannot always meet...
March 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27714547/downstairs-my-father-is-dying
#20
Johanna Shapiro
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: Journal of Medical Humanities
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