journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724447/using-heuristic-evaluation-to-improve-sepsis-alert-usability
#1
REVIEW
Ariani Arista Putri Pertiwi, Dan Fraczkowski, Sheryl L Stogis, Karen Dunn Lopez
Sepsis, life-threatening organ dysfunction in response to infection, is an alarmingly common and aggressive illness in US hospitals, especially for intensive care patients. Preventing sepsis deaths rests on the clinicians' ability to promptly recognize and treat sepsis. To aid early recognition, many organizations have employed clinician-facing electronic sepsis alert systems. However, the effectiveness of the alert relies on heavily on the visual interface, textual information, and overall usability. This article reports a usability inspection of a sepsis alert system...
June 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724446/telemedicine-in-the-intensive-care-unit-improved-access-to-care-at-what-cost
#2
REVIEW
William J Binder, Jennifer L Cook, Nickalaus Gramze, Sophia Airhart
Health systems across the United States are adopting intensive care unit telemedicine programs to improve patient outcomes. Research demonstrates the potential for decreased mortality and length of stay for patients of these remotely monitored units. Financial models and studies point to cost-effectiveness and the possibility of cost savings in the face of abundant startup costs. Questions remain as to the true financial implications of these programs and targeted populations that may see the greatest benefit...
June 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724445/advancing-continuous-predictive-analytics-monitoring-moving-from-implementation-to-clinical-action-in-a-learning-health-system
#3
REVIEW
Jessica Keim-Malpass, Rebecca R Kitzmiller, Angela Skeeles-Worley, Curt Lindberg, Matthew T Clark, Robert Tai, James Forrest Calland, Kevin Sullivan, J Randall Moorman, Ruth A Anderson
In the intensive care unit, clinicians monitor a diverse array of data inputs to detect early signs of impending clinical demise or improvement. Continuous predictive analytics monitoring synthesizes data from a variety of inputs into a risk estimate that clinicians can observe in a streaming environment. For this to be useful, clinicians must engage with the data in a way that makes sense for their clinical workflow in the context of a learning health system (LHS). This article describes the processes needed to evoke clinical action after initiation of continuous predictive analytics monitoring in an LHS...
June 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724444/work-system-barriers-and-strategies-reported-by-tele-intensive-care-unit-nurses-a-case-study
#4
Peter L T Hoonakker, Pascale Carayon
Tele-intensive care units (ICUs) are an innovation to handle issues such as personnel shortage and improving care. In tele-ICUs, clinical teams monitor ICU patients remotely and support clinicians in multiple ICUs. The tele-ICU and ICU clinicians function as virtual teams. Little is known how these teams function and what challenges they encounter. We examined the challenges from the perspective of nurses in a tele-ICU. We used a case study design and conducted interviews with 10 tele-ICU nurses. The nurses encounter challenges in interacting with the multiple ICUs that they monitor remotely and have developed strategies to cope with these challenges...
June 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724443/advocating-for-greater-usability-in-clinical-technologies-the-role-of-the-practicing-nurse
#5
REVIEW
Karen Dunn Lopez, Linda Fahey
Health care, especially ICUs, rely on multiple types of technology to promote the best patient outcomes. Unfortunately, too often these technologies are poorly designed, causing errors, additional workload, and unnecessary frustration. The purpose of this article is to (1) empower nurses with the needed usability and usability testing vocabulary to identify and articulate clinical technology usability problems and (2) provide ideas on ways nurses can advocate to have an impact on positive change related to technology usability within a health care organization...
June 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724442/informatics-solutions-for-application-of-decision-making-skills
#6
REVIEW
Christine W Nibbelink, Janay R Young, Jane M Carrington, Barbara B Brewer
Critical care nurses practice in a challenging environment that requires responses to patients with complex, often unstable health conditions. The electronic health record, access to clinical data, and Clinical Decision Support Systems informed by data from clinical databases are informatics tools designed to work together to facilitate decision-making in nursing practice. The complex decision-making environment of critical care requires informatics tools that support nursing practice through integration of current evidence with clinical data...
June 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724441/human-factors-in-medical-device-design-methods-principles-and-guidelines
#7
REVIEW
Russell J Branaghan
A total of 400,000 to 500,000 patients die in intensive care units (ICUs) each year, largely because ICUs care for the sickest patients. On the other hand, factors such as workload, shift changes, handoffs, alarm fatigue, inadequate team communication, and difficult-to-use medical devices contribute to the problem. This article focuses on the human factors of those medical devices, a significant cause of adverse events in the ICU.
June 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724440/intravenous-smart-pumps-usability-issues-intravenous-medication-administration-error-and-patient-safety
#8
REVIEW
Karen K Giuliano
With an estimated 90% of all hospitalized patients receiving intravenous medications via infusion pumps, intravenous infusion pump systems are among the most frequently used technologies in health care. This article reviews important issues regarding clinical usability, intravenous medication administration error, and patient safety related to the use of intravenous smart pumps. Although it is possible to address some of the issues with changes in clinical processes, the most fundamental challenges need to be addressed through innovation and the development of new technologies using a human factors approach...
June 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724439/nurse-technology-interactions-and-patient-safety
#9
REVIEW
Halley Ruppel, Marjorie Funk
Nurses are the end-users of most technology in intensive care units, and the ways in which they interact with technology affect quality of care and patient safety. Nurses' interactions include the processes of ensuring proper input of data into the technology as well as extracting and interpreting the output (clinical data, technical data, alarms). Current challenges in nurse-technology interactions for physiologic monitoring include issues regarding alarm management, workflow interruptions, and monitor surveillance...
June 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724438/critical-care-nurses-cognitive-ergonomics-related-to-medical-device-alarms
#10
REVIEW
Shu-Fen Wung, Marilyn Rose Schatz
This study uniquely gained insight into the intricacy of intensive care nurses' decision-making process when responding to and managing device alarms. Difficulty in responding to alarms included low staffing, multiple job responsibilities, and competing priority tasks. Novice nurses are more tolerant of alarms sounding owing to a lower threshold of comfort with resetting or silencing alarms; more experienced nurses are more comfortable resetting alarm limits to the patient's baseline. Understanding the decision-making process used by nurses can guide the development of policies and learning experiences that are crucial clinical support for alarm management...
June 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29724437/sensory-overload-and-technology-in-critical-care
#11
REVIEW
Shu-Fen Wung, Daniel C Malone, Laura Szalacha
In this focus group study, we identified issues associated with sensory overload from medical technology alarms/alerts for intensive care unit nurses. Participants indicated that alarms from cardiopulmonary monitors, ventilators, and intravenous pumps contributed the most to sensory overload and, yet, these alarms were also deemed the most helpful. Alerts/alarms from electronic health records and medication dispensing systems were rated low in contributing to sensory overload, as well as being the least helpful...
June 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29413224/gastrointestinal-issues-and-complications
#12
EDITORIAL
Deborah Weatherspoon, Debra Henline Sullivan
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29413219/gastrointestinal-issues-and-complications
#13
Deborah Weatherspoon, Debra Henline Sullivan
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29413218/evidence-based-practice-in-the-treatment-for-antibiotic-associated-diarrhea-in-the-intensive-care-unit
#14
REVIEW
Robin Squellati
Unit nurses provide care to patients with serious health conditions. Often antibiotics are recommended to fight infections. Sometimes patients are on proton pump inhibitors (PPI). Antibiotics and PPIs may lead to diarrhea, causing the patient more discomfort, and possibly leading to a more serious infection. One serious infection is caused by Clostridium difficile, which causes death in some cases. About 75% of patients on antibiotics may not need antibiotics. Several studies showed less diarrhea in patients on probiotics...
March 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29413217/educating-nurses-in-the-intensive-care-unit-about-gastrointestinal-complications-using-an-algorithm-embedded-into-simulation
#15
REVIEW
Loretta Bond, Beth Hallmark
It can be a challenge to prepare intensive care unit (ICU) nurses to recognize and care for the complex needs of deteriorating patients, especially in patients with gastrointestinal (GI) complications, who often present with vague but serious issues. Tools such as the sequential organ failure assessment tool and the GI failure tool have been used to assist nurses in decision making. This article discusses how to incorporate such tools into an algorithm for simulation training for ICU nurses that integrates a clinical judgment model to shape care for patients with GI complications...
March 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29413216/acute-diverticulitis-management
#16
REVIEW
Deborah L Ellison
Diverticular disease accounts for approximately 300,000 hospitalizations per year in the United States, resulting in 1.5 million days of inpatient care. Diverticulitis is defined as an inflammation of the diverticulum, which can be asymptomatic or symptomatic. This disease is the third most common gastrointestinal illness that requires hospitalization and the leading indication for elective colon resection. Abdominal pain is the most common complaint in patients with acute diverticulitis. The pain can be described as cramping, constant, and persistent for several days...
March 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29413215/management-of-acute-gastrointestinal-bleed
#17
REVIEW
Francisca Cisneros Farrar
Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem found in critically ill patients that can range from self-limited bleeding to a hemorrhaging emergency. Patients can quickly develop shock and altered mental status when they develop hemodynamic instability. Therefore, it is essential that the frontline critical care nurse develop self-efficacy for management of these disorders. This article overviews standards of practice for the management of upper and lower acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Common bleeding disorders are reviewed with expanded focus on peptic ulcer, acute variceal hemorrhage, colonic diverticular bleeding, and angiodysplasias, which are commonly found in the critical care setting...
March 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29413214/clostridium-difficile-more-challenging-than-ever
#18
REVIEW
Shelley C Moore
Clostridium difficile infection is not new, but it is posing more problems than ever before, described by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as an urgent threat. Its pathophysiology allows C difficile to be very difficult to manage, both within the hospital environment and in a patient's body. This article reviews clinical manifestations of the infection, outlines both medical and surgical treatment options, and discusses risk factors and predictors. Implications for nurses are thoroughly described...
March 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29413213/mesenteric-ischemia
#19
REVIEW
Robin M Lawson
Mesenteric ischemia is an uncommon disease most often seen in the elderly. This disease results from blood flow in the mesenteric circulation that inadequately meets metabolic needs of the visceral organs and, if untreated, eventually leads to necrosis of the bowel wall. Mesenteric ischemia is divided into 2 types: acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) and chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI). Delayed diagnosis of CMI can lead to AMI. AMI is associated with extremely high mortalities. Early diagnosis via computed tomography angiography and prompt revascularization via endovascular therapy are recommended for symptomatic patients who have not developed bowel ischemia and necrosis...
March 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29413212/gastroesophageal-reflux-regurgitation-in-the-infant-population
#20
REVIEW
Teresa D Ferguson
Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is common in infancy and mainly treated through nonpharmacological interventions. Knowing the early warning signs of GER is important for nursing assessment. Untreated GER can become acute when an infant fails to gain weight and has recurrent, forceful vomiting. Further investigation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is indicated when failure to gain weight, irritability, swallowing difficulties, regurgitation, and respiratory complications occur and should trigger referral to pediatric specialists...
March 2018: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America
journal
journal
30191
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"