Read by QxMD icon Read

Seminars in Dialysis

M Alan Brookhart, Xiaojuan Li, Abhijit V Kshirsagar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 20, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
James Tattersall
Current guidelines focus on conventional dialysis defined as 3-5 hours, three times per week, and suggest that longer or more frequent dialysis be considered. This paper presents the case for considering that shorter or less frequent dialysis should also be considered. More frequent and/or longer dialysis facilitates control of fluid overload, blood pressure, and phosphate levels. These benefits will require time to translate into probable hard outcome improvement. Patients are unlikely to participate in productive or pleasurable activities while undergoing dialysis in center or traveling to treatment...
October 20, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
Jonathan Wong, Raja Mohammed Kaja Kamal, Enric Vilar, Ken Farrington
Many patients on hemodialysis retain significant residual renal function (RRF) but currently measurement of RRF in routine clinical practice can only be achieved using inter-dialytic urine collections to measure urea and creatinine clearances. Urine collections are difficult and inconvenient for patients and staff, and therefore RRF is not universally measured. Methods to assess RRF without reliance on urine collections are needed since RRF provides useful clinical and prognostic information and also permits the application of incremental hemodialysis techniques...
October 18, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
Behdad D Besharatian, Jeffrey S Berns
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 10, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
John T Daugirdas
Residual kidney urea clearance in dialysis patients typically is calculated as the per minute excretion of urea nitrogen, obtained during the 24-48 hour collection period that usually ends just prior to a dialysis session, divided by the time-averaged serum water urea nitrogen concentration during the collection period. This concentration is difficult to estimate unless a formal kinetic modeling program is being used. We used a urea kinetic modeling program to derive an equation to estimate the time-averaged serum water concentration during urine collection periods of various lengths collected during various interdialytic intervals, for 3/week or 2/week dialysis schedules...
October 4, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
Steven Fishbane
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 29, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
Fabio Rosario Salerno, Grace Parraga, Christopher William McIntyre
Dyspnea is one of the most common symptoms associated with CKD. It has a profound influence on the quality of life of CKD patients, and its underlying causes are often associated with a negative prognosis. However, its pathophysiology is poorly understood. While hemodialysis may address fluid overload, it often does not significantly improve breathlessness, suggesting multiple and co-existing alternative issues exist. The aim of this article is to discuss the main pathophysiologic mechanisms and the most important putative etiologies underlying dyspnea in CKD patients...
September 28, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
Jay B Wish
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 27, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
Pierpaolo Di Nicolò, Marina Cornacchiari, Marco Mereghetti, Anna Mudoni
As a consequence of the central role of the arteriovenous fistula for dialysis (AVF) in the clinical management of the dialysis patient the necessity to limit the puncture-related complications to extend as much as possible the life of the vascular access. Accordingly, the AVF needling technique has gained growing attention. Alongside the traditional rope ladder (RL) puncture method, the buttonhole technique (BH) is increasingly popular; this technique employs the same cannulation sites of AVF in every dialysis associated with the use of dull needles to minimize vessels damage...
September 27, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
William H Fissell
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 27, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
Jochen G Raimann, Antonios H Tzamaloukas, Nathan W Levin, Todd S Ing
Since the beginning of life of the first multicellular organisms, the preservation of a physiologic milieu for every cell in the organism has been a critical requirement. A particular range of osmolality of the body fluids is essential for the maintenance of cell volume. In humans the stability of electrolyte concentrations and their resulting osmolality in the body fluids is the consequence of complex interactions between cell membrane functions, hormonal control, thirst, and controlled kidney excretion of fluid and solutes...
September 9, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
Andrzej Ratajczak, Małgorzata Lange-Ratajczak, Adam Bobkiewicz, Adam Studniarek
This report reviews the most common surgical interventions and complications of chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Based on the current knowledge as well as our experience we detail the role of these surgical procedures. We supplement the reported knowledge in the field with our own experience in this area. The areas discussed include early complications such as surgical wound hemorrhage, bleeding from the catheter, intestinal perforation and urinary bladder perforation, dialysate leakage through the wound, as well as late complications including catheter kinking or occlusion, retention of fluid in the peritoneal recess, hernias and hydrothorax, and encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis...
September 6, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
Shubha Ananthakrishnan, Thomas A Depner
Hemodialysis has come a long way since its early days and is a life sustaining therapy for millions of people with end-stage kidney disease throughout the world. Although thrice weekly hemodialysis remains the most common form of renal replacement therapy, other therapies such as more frequent, prolonged dialysis modalities have seen a rise recently. In this review, we compare and contrast methods for measuring the dialysis dose, with a focus on small molecule clearance (Kt/Vurea ) among various dialysis modalities...
September 4, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
John K Leypoldt, Björn K I Meijers
The kinetics of uremic solute clearances are discussed based on two categories of uremic solutes, namely those that are and those that are not derived directly from nutrient intake, particularly dietary protein intake. This review highlights dialysis treatments that are more frequent and longer (high-dose hemodialysis) than conventional thrice weekly therapy. It is proposed that the dialysis dose measures based on urea as a marker uremic solute, such as Kt/V and stdKt/V, be referred to as measures of dialysis inadequacy, not dialysis adequacy...
August 31, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
Thomas A Golper
Incremental hemodialysis (incrHD) is not widely used nor is it well understood. In addition, and perhaps with more impact, governmental regulations in the United States and their consequential influences on dialysis provider organizations have made the practice of incrHD more difficult than traditional thrice weekly in-center HD. IncrHD is critically dependent on the amount of residual kidney function (RKF) as well as the individualized goals of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) management. RKF has to be assessed frequently and dialysis adjusted accordingly...
August 25, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
Barnaby Hole, Sarah Tonkin-Crine, Fergus J Caskey, Paul Roderick
For the majority of patients with end-stage kidney failure (ESKF) replacement of excretory renal function by dialysis or transplantation (RRT) can extend life and alleviate symptoms. Historically, the availability of RRT has been insufficient and this remains the case for much of the world. However, RRT is now widely available in healthcare systems of higher income countries. Increasing numbers of elderly patients are developing ESKF. RRT in this population is largely by dialysis, comorbidity is high and life expectancy short...
August 25, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
Frank J O'Brien, Kara D Fong, Tammy L Sirich, Timothy W Meyer
Patients maintained on standard three times weekly hemodialysis have a high mortality rate and a limited quality of life. Some of this illness is due to systemic diseases that have caused kidney failure, and thus may be irreversible. But we presume that imperfect replacement of normal kidney function by dialysis contributes importantly. Patients on hemodialysis are subject to fluctuations in extracellular fluid volume and inorganic ion concentrations and their plasma levels of many organic waste solutes remain very high...
August 24, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
Aghogho Odudu, Christopher W McIntyre
Cardiac dysfunction is a key factor in the high morbidity and mortality rates seen in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Much of the dysfunction is manifest as adverse changes in cardiac and vascular structure prior to commencing dialysis. This adverse vascular remodeling arises as a dysregulation between pro- and antiproliferative signaling pathways in response to hemodynamic and nonhemodynamic factors. The HD procedure itself further promotes cardiomyopathy by inducing hypotension and episodic regional cardiac ischemia that precedes global dysfunction, fibrosis, worsening symptoms, and increased mortality...
August 24, 2016: Seminars in Dialysis
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"