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Teaching and Learning in Medicine

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28358219/supporting-evidence-informed-teaching-in-biomedical-and-health-professions-education-through-knowledge-translation-an-interdisciplinary-literature-review
#1
Rochelle E Tractenberg, Morris Gordon
Phenomenon: The purpose of "systematic" reviews/reviewers of medical and health professions educational research is to identify best practices. This qualitative article explores the question of whether systematic reviews can support "evidence informed" teaching and contrasts traditional systematic reviewing with a knowledge translation (KT) approach to this objective. APPROACH: Degrees of freedom analysis (DOFA) is used to examine the alignment of systematic review methods with educational research and the pedagogical strategies and approaches that might be considered with a decision-making framework developed to support valid assessment...
March 30, 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318319/medical-student-perceptions-of-the-learning-environment-in-medical-school-change-as-students-transition-to-clinical-training-in-undergraduate-medical-school
#2
Lisette Dunham, Michael Dekhtyar, Gregory Gruener, Eileen CichoskiKelly, Jennifer Deitz, Donna Elliott, Margaret L Stuber, Susan E Skochelak
Phenomenon: The learning environment is the physical, social, and psychological context in which a student learns. A supportive learning environment contributes to student well-being and enhances student empathy, professionalism, and academic success, whereas an unsupportive learning environment may lead to burnout, exhaustion, and cynicism. Student perceptions of the medical school learning environment may change over time and be associated with students' year of training and may differ significantly depending on the student's gender or race/ethnicity...
March 20, 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28296513/who-is-the-preferred-tutor-in-clinical-skills-training-physicians-nurses-or-peers
#3
Ece Şükriye Abay, Sevgi Turan, Orhan Odabaşı, Melih Elçin
Phenomenon: Clinical skills centers allow structured training of undergraduate medical students for the acquisition of clinical skills in a simulated environment. Physician, nurse, or peer tutors are employed for training in those centers. All tutors should have appropriate training about the methodology used in the clinical skills training. Many of the studies revealed the effectiveness of various types of tutors. The aim of our study was to evaluate medical students' satisfaction with clinical skills training, and their opinions about the differences in coaching skills among the physician, nurse, and peer tutors...
March 15, 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28281832/outcomes-of-introducing-early-learners-to-interprofessional-competencies-in-a-classroom-setting
#4
Kelly S Lockeman, Sharon K Lanning, Alan W Dow, Joseph A Zorek, Deborah DiazGranados, Carole K Ivey, Shawne Soper
PROBLEM: Although interprofessional practice is important for improving healthcare delivery, there is little evidence describing interprofessional education (IPE) outcomes beyond changes in attitudes and knowledge of prelicensure learners. More rigorous evaluation of early IPE is needed to determine its impact on teaching interprofessional collaborative practice and providing a solid foundation for applying collaborative skills in the clinical environment. INTERVENTION: First-year students (N = 679) in 7 health professions programs participated in a 4-session series focusing on professional roles and responsibilities, teams and teamwork, and the healthcare system...
March 10, 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28272900/the-development-and-impact-of-a-social-media-and-professionalism-course-for-medical-students
#5
Alexandra W Gomes, Gisela Butera, Katherine C Chretien, Terry Kind
PROBLEM: Inappropriate social media behavior can have detrimental effects on students' future opportunities, but medical students are given little opportunity to reflect upon ways of integrating their social media identities with their newly forming professional identities. INTERVENTION: In 2012, a required educational session was developed for 1st-year medical students on social media and professional identity. Objectives include identifying professionalism issues and recognizing positive social media use...
March 8, 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28402207/journal-watch-from-ace-alliance-for-clinical-education-annual-review-of-medical-education-articles-in-internal-medicine-journals-2014-2015
#6
Katherine Walsh, Irene Alexandraki, Alfred P Burger, Shobhina G Chheda, Deborah DeWaay, Mark J Fagan, Susan A Glod, Debra S Leizman, Beth Liston, Clifford D Packer, Amber T Pincavage, Joseph T Wayne, Alison Aldrich, Karen Szauter
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27813688/the-health-professions-education-pathway-preparing-students-residents-and-fellows-to-become-future-educators
#7
H Carrie Chen, Maria A Wamsley, Amin Azzam, Katherine Julian, David M Irby, Patricia S O'Sullivan
PROBLEM: Training the next generation of health professionals requires leaders, innovators, and scholars in education. Although many medical schools and residencies offer education electives or tracks focused on developing teaching skills, these programs often omit educational innovation, scholarship, and leadership and are narrowly targeted to one level of learner. INTERVENTION: The University of California San Francisco created the Health Professions Education Pathway for medical students, residents, and fellows as well as learners from other health professional schools...
April 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28098483/academic-performance-on-first-year-medical-school-exams-how-well-does-it-predict-later-performance-on-knowledge-based-and-clinical-assessments
#8
Edward Krupat, Stephen R Pelletier, Jules L Dienstag
Number of appearances in the bottom quartile of 1st-year medical school exams were used to represent the extent to which students were having academic difficulties. Medical educators have long expressed a desire to have indicators of medical student performance that have strong predictive validity. Predictors traditionally used fell into 4 general categories: demographic (e.g., gender), other background factors (e.g., college major), performance/aptitude (e.g., medical college admission test scores), and noncognitive factors (e...
January 18, 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28051893/shame-in-medical-education-a-randomized-study-of-the-acquisition-of-intimate-examination-skills-and-its-effect-on-subsequent-performance
#9
Wolf E Hautz, Therese Schröder, Katja A Dannenberg, Maren März, Henrike Hölzer, Olaf Ahlers, Anke Thomas
THEORY: Although medical students are exposed to a variety of emotions, the impact of emotions on learning has received little attention so far. Shame-provoking intimate examinations are among the most memorable events for students. Their emotions, however, are rarely addressed during training, potentially leading to withdrawal and avoidance and, consequently, performance deficits. However, emotions of negative valance such as shame may be particularly valuable for learning, as they might prompt mental rehearsal...
January 4, 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28051890/journal-watch-from-ace-alliance-for-clinical-education-review-of-medical-education-articles-in-obstetrics-and-gynecology-2013-2015
#10
Brittany Star Hampton, Archana Pradhan, Jodi Abbott, Samantha D Buery-Joyner, LaTasha B Craig, David Forstein, Laura Hopkins, Abigail Wolf, Sarah M Page-Ramsey
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 4, 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28051889/race-ethnicity-in-medical-education-an-analysis-of-a-question-bank-for-step-1-of-the-united-states-medical-licensing-examination
#11
Kelsey Ripp, Lundy Braun
Phenomenon: There is growing concern over racial/ethnic bias in clinical care, yet how best to reduce bias remains challenging, in part because the sources of bias in medical education are poorly understood. One possible source is the routinized use of race/ethnicity in lectures, assessment, and preparatory materials, including question banks for licensing examinations. Because students worldwide use question banks to prepare for the United States Medical Licensing Examination, we examined how race/ethnicity was used in one of the most commonly recommended question banks...
January 4, 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28117621/acknowledgments
#12
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27662118/justify-your-answer-the-role-of-written-think-aloud-in-script-concordance-testing
#13
Alyssa Power, Jean-Francois Lemay, Suzette Cooke
Construct: Clinical reasoning assessment is a growing area of interest in the medical education literature. Script concordance testing (SCT) evaluates clinical reasoning in conditions of uncertainty and has emerged as an innovative tool in the domain of clinical reasoning assessment. SCT quantifies the degree of concordance between a learner and an experienced clinician and attempts to capture the breadth of responses of expert clinicians, acknowledging the significant yet acceptable variation in practice under situations of uncertainty...
January 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27541066/medical-students-understanding-of-directed-questioning-by-their-clinical-preceptors
#14
Lawrence Lo, Glenn Regehr
Phenomenon: Throughout clerkship, preceptors ask medical students questions for both assessment and teaching purposes. However, the cognitive and strategic aspects of students' approaches to managing this situation have not been explored. Without an understanding of how students approach the question and answer activity, medical educators are unable to appreciate how effectively this activity fulfills their purposes of assessment or determine the activity's associated educational effects. APPROACH: A convenience sample of nine 4th-year medical students participated in semistructured one-on-one interviews exploring their approaches to managing situations in which they have been challenged with questions from preceptors to which they do not know the answer...
January 2017: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28033488/medical-student-perspectives-of-active-learning-a-focus-group-study
#15
Anne Walling, Kathryn Istas, Giulia A Bonaminio, Anthony M Paolo, Joseph D Fontes, Nancy Davis, Benito A Berardo
Phenomenon: Medical student perspectives were sought about active learning, including concerns, challenges, perceived advantages and disadvantages, and appropriate role in the educational process. APPROACH: Focus groups were conducted with students from all years and campuses of a large U.S. state medical school. FINDINGS: Students had considerable experience with active learning prior to medical school and conveyed accurate understanding of the concept and its major strategies...
December 29, 2016: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28033485/acculturation-needs-of-pediatric-international-medical-graduates-a-qualitative-study
#16
Amanda D Osta, Michelle M Barnes, Regina Pessagno, Alan Schwartz, Laura E Hirshfield
Phenomenon: International medical graduates (IMGs) play a key role in host countries' health systems but face unique challenges, which makes effective, tailored support for IMGs essential. Prior literature describing the acculturation needs of IMGs focused primarily on communication content and style. We conducted a qualitative study to explore acculturation that might be specific to IMG residents who care for children. APPROACH: In a study conducted from November 2011 to April 2012, we performed four 90-minute semistructured focus groups with 26 pediatric IMG residents from 12 countries...
December 29, 2016: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28033472/obesity-coverage-on-medical-licensing-examinations-in-the-united-states-what-is-being-tested
#17
Robert F Kushner, W Scott Butsch, Scott Kahan, Sriram Machineni, Stephen Cook, Louis J Aronne
Phenomenon. As one of the most common chronic disease affecting adults and children, obesity is a major contributor to noncommunicable diseases, both nationally and globally. Obesity adversely affects every organ system, and as such it is imperative that the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) adequately assesses students' knowledge about the science and practice of obesity management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the coverage and distribution of obesity-related items on the three USMLE Step examinations...
December 29, 2016: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28001442/-it-s-just-not-the-culture-a-qualitative-study-exploring-residents-perceptions-of-the-impact-of-institutional-culture-on-feedback
#18
Subha Ramani, Sarah E Post, Karen Könings, Karen Mann, Joel T Katz, Cees van der Vleuten
Phenomenon: Competency-based medical education requires ongoing performance-based feedback for professional growth. In several studies, medical trainees report that the quality of faculty feedback is inadequate. Sociocultural barriers to feedback exchanges are further amplified in graduate and postgraduate medical education settings, where trainees serve as frontline providers of patient care. Factors that affect institutional feedback culture, enhance feedback seeking, acceptance, and bidirectional feedback warrant further exploration in these settings...
December 21, 2016: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28001436/teaching-resident-self-assessment-through-triangulation-of-faculty-and-patient-feedback
#19
Drew M Keister, Susan E Hansen, Julie Dostal
PROBLEM: To accurately determine one's ability in any clinical competency, an individual must be able to self-assess performance and identify personal limitations. Existing research demonstrates that physicians of all levels are unreliable self-assessors. This poses a concern in medical practice, which requires continuous updates to clinical competencies and awareness of personal limitations. Few published studies examine graduate medical education curricula designed to develop self-assessment skills...
December 21, 2016: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27997224/implementing-peer-learning-in-clinical-education-a-framework-to-address-challenges-in-the-real-world
#20
Joanna Hong Meng Tai, Benedict J Canny, Terry P Haines, Elizabeth K Molloy
Phenomenon: Peer learning has many benefits and can assist students in gaining the educational skills required in future years when they become teachers themselves. Peer learning may be particularly useful in clinical learning environments, where students report feeling marginalized, overwhelmed, and unsupported. Educational interventions often fail in the workplace environment, as they are often conceived in the "ideal" rather than the complex, messy real world. This work sought to explore barriers and facilitators to implementing peer learning activities in a clinical curriculum...
December 20, 2016: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
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