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Teaching and Learning in Medicine

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29847155/perceptions-of-patient-centered-care-among-first-year-medical-students
#1
Bruce L Henschen, Elizabeth R Ryan, Daniel B Evans, Ashley Truong, Diane B Wayne, Jennifer A Bierman, Kenzie A Cameron
Phenomenon: Teaching patient-centered care (PCC) is a key component of undergraduate medical curricula. Prior frameworks of PCC describe multiple domains of patient-centeredness, ranging from interpersonal encounters to systems-level issues. Medical students' perceptions of PCC are thought to erode as they progress through school, but little is known about how students view PCC toward the beginning of training. This study explores the perceptions of PCC among 1st-year medical students to inform curricular development and evaluation...
May 30, 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29648898/use-of-standard-guidelines-for-department-of-medicine-summary-letters
#2
Matthew Fitz, Jeffrey La Rochelle, Valerie Lang, Deborah DeWaay, William Adams, Farah Nasraty
Phenomenon: Fourth-year medical students obtain Department of Medicine (DOM) letters ("Chair" letters) to support their residency applications. Writing and interpreting DOM letters are challenging. There is heterogeneity in the letters that makes it difficult to both write and read these letters. APPROACH: The purpose of this study is to determine the value of new guidelines developed by a task force of clerkship directors and program directors in internal medicine and assess the implementation of these guidelines...
July 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29384413/having-the-headspace-for-compassion-toward-self-and-others-a-qualitative-study-of-medical-students-views-and-experiences
#3
Stephanie Tierney, Cameron-Tosh Ozer, Sophie Perry
Phenomenon: Debate about compassion exhibited by healthcare professionals has escalated, following a perceived decline over recent years. At the same time, a growing interest in self-compassion has emerged, which is seen as facilitating compassion toward others. Little research has explored, in depth, what compassion to self and others means to medical students. Therefore, a study was designed to address this gap in knowledge. APPROACH: A qualitative study was conducted, involving students from all 4 years of a graduate-entry medical school in the United Kingdom...
July 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29381099/quality-evaluation-scores-are-no-more-reliable-than-gestalt-in-evaluating-the-quality-of-emergency-medicine-blogs-a-metriq-study
#4
Brent Thoma, Stefanie S Sebok-Syer, Isabelle Colmers-Gray, Jonathan Sherbino, Felix Ankel, N Seth Trueger, Andrew Grock, Marshall Siemens, Michael Paddock, Eve Purdy, William Kenneth Milne, Teresa M Chan
Construct: We investigated the quality of emergency medicine (EM) blogs as educational resources. PURPOSE: Online medical education resources such as blogs are increasingly used by EM trainees and clinicians. However, quality evaluations of these resources using gestalt are unreliable. We investigated the reliability of two previously derived quality evaluation instruments for blogs. APPROACH: Sixty English-language EM websites that published clinically oriented blog posts between January 1 and February 24, 2016, were identified...
July 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29377731/there-s-a-lot-more-to-being-a-physician-insights-from-an-intensive-clinical-shadowing-experience-in-internal-medicine
#5
Lauren Block, Kevin Wang, Catherine C Gao, Albert W Wu, Leonard S Feldman
Phenomenon: Although most premedical students shadow physicians prior to starting medical school, there is no set of guidelines or expectations to facilitate effective experiences for students and physicians, nor is there data on the value of shadowing medical trainees as a way to learn about the training environment. We sought to understand premedical student perspectives on an intensive resident shadowing experience. APPROACH: This was a qualitative study using anonymous data from focus groups conducted with premedical student participants in a month-long time motion analysis of internal medicine interns at two large academic medical centers...
July 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29364745/do-gold-humanism-honor-society-inductees-differ-from-their-peers-in-empathy-patient-centeredness-tolerance-of-ambiguity-coping-style-and-perception-of-the-learning-environment
#6
Elizabeth Gaufberg, Lisette Dunham, Edward Krupat, Brent Stansfield, Charles Christianson, Susan Skochelak
Construct: Induction into the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) during medical school is recognized as an indicator of humanistic orientation and behavior. Various attitudes and interpersonal orientations including empathy and patient-centeredness have been posited to translate into behaviors constituting humanistic care. BACKGROUND: To our knowledge there has never been a longitudinal, multi-institutional empirical study of the attitudinal and interpersonal orientations correlated with GHHS membership status...
July 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29364732/improving-practice-guideline-adherence-through-peer-feedback-impact-of-an-ambulatory-cardiology-curriculum
#7
Karl M Richardson, Jai Singh, Dan Muñoz, Julie B Damp, Lisa A Mendes
PROBLEM: Graduate medical trainees must be prepared to practice in a quality-driven system that values adherence to and documentation of evidence-based care. Few validated approaches exist to teach these skills. Our objective was to develop, implement, and evaluate an ambulatory practice improvement curriculum capitalizing on peer feedback aimed at improving cardiology fellow guideline knowledge, adherence, and chart documentation. INTERVENTION: Four outpatient topics were reviewed in dedicated 1-hour sessions: stable ischemic heart disease, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and aortic valvular disease...
July 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351403/project-on-the-good-physician-further-evidence-for-the-validity-of-a-moral-intuitionist-model-of-virtuous-caring
#8
G Michael Leffel, Ross A Oakes Mueller, Sandra A Ham, Kyle E Karches, Farr A Curlin, John D Yoon
THEORY: In the Project on the Good Physician, the authors propose a moral intuitionist model of virtuous caring that places the virtues of Mindfulness, Empathic Compassion, and Generosity at the heart of medical character education. HYPOTHESES: Hypothesis 1a: The virtues of Mindfulness, Empathic Compassion, and Generosity will be positively associated with one another (convergent validity). Hypothesis 1b: The virtues of Mindfulness and Empathic Compassion will explain variance in the action-related virtue of Generosity beyond that predicted by Big Five personality traits alone (discriminant validity)...
July 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29283674/patient-narratives-as-a-teaching-tool-a-pilot-study-of-first-year-medical-students-and-patient-educators-affected-by-intellectual-developmental-disabilities
#9
Alon Coret, Kerry Boyd, Kevin Hobbs, Joyce Zazulak, Meghan McConnell
PROBLEM: People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) face complex biopsychosocial challenges and are medically underserved. This is in part due to insufficient resources and supports but can also be attributed to a lack of adequate physician training in addressing the unique needs of this population. INTERVENTION: This study aimed to introduce 1st-year medical students to the IDD population using a blended educational experience that included video narratives of and direct interactions with people affected by IDD...
July 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29283669/systems-thinking-and-systems-based-practice-across-the-health-professions-an-inquiry-into-definitions-teaching-practices-and-assessment
#10
Margaret M Plack, Ellen F Goldman, Andrea R Scott, Christine Pintz, Debra Herrmann, Kathleen Kline, Tracey Thompson, Shelley B Brundage
Phenomenon: Systems thinking is the cornerstone of systems-based practice (SBP) and a core competency in medicine and health sciences. Literature regarding how to teach or apply systems thinking in practice is limited. This study aimed to understand how educators in medicine, physical therapy, physician assistant, nursing, and speech-language pathology education programs teach and assess systems thinking and SBP. APPROACH: Twenty-six educators from seven different degree programs across the five professions were interviewed and program descriptions and relevant course syllabi were reviewed...
July 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29240451/hpe-as-a-field-implications-for-the-production-of-compelling-knowledge
#11
Anneke van Enk, Glenn Regehr
ISSUE: Research in education, including health professions education, has long struggled with the competing concerns of academic and practice-based stakeholders. Inspired partially by the work of Stokes and other theorists in science and technology studies, we propose that discussions about compelling research in health professions education might be usefully advanced by considering what it would mean if the community framed itself as a knowledge-producing field instead of aligning itself with either disciplinary or practical interests...
July 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29775080/mindfulness-meditation-and-interprofessional-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-a-mixed-methods-pilot-study
#12
Diana J Kelm, Jennifer L Ridgeway, Becca L Gas, Monali Mohan, David A Cook, Darlene R Nelson, Roberto P Benzo
PROBLEM: Mindfulness training includes mindfulness meditation, which has been shown to improve both attention and self-awareness. Medical providers in the intensive care unit often deal with difficult situations with strong emotions, life-and-death decisions, and both interpersonal and interprofessional conflicts. The effect of mindfulness meditation training on healthcare providers during acute care tasks such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation remains unknown. Mindfulness meditation has the potential to improve provider well-being and reduce stress in individuals involved in resuscitation teams, which could then translate into better team communication and delivery of care under stress...
May 18, 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29708437/adapting-maslow-s-hierarchy-of-needs-as-a-framework-for-resident-wellness
#13
Andrew J Hale, Daniel N Ricotta, Jason Freed, C Christopher Smith, Grace C Huang
ISSUE: Burnout in graduate medical education is pervasive and has a deleterious impact on career satisfaction, personal well-being, and patient outcomes. Interventions in residency programs have often addressed isolated contributors to burnout; however, a more comprehensive framework for conceptualizing wellness is needed. EVIDENCE: In this article the authors propose Maslow's hierarchy of human needs (physiologic, safety, love/belonging, esteem, and self-actualization) as a potential framework for addressing wellness initiatives...
April 30, 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29658802/a-qualitative-analysis-of-narrative-preclerkship-assessment-data-to-evaluate-teamwork-skills
#14
Brigid M Dolan, Celia Laird O'Brien, Kenzie A Cameron, Marianne M Green
Construct: Students entering the health professions require competency in teamwork. BACKGROUND: Although many teamwork curricula and assessments exist, studies have not demonstrated robust longitudinal assessment of preclerkship students' teamwork skills and attitudes. Assessment portfolios may serve to fill this gap, but it is unknown how narrative comments within portfolios describe student teamwork behaviors. APPROACH: We performed a qualitative analysis of narrative data in 15 assessment portfolios...
April 16, 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29658798/mock-echo-a-simulation-based-medical-education-method
#15
Rebecca C Fowler, Joanna G Katzman, George D Comerci, Brian M Shelley, Daniel Duhigg, Cynthia Olivas, Thomas Arnold, Summers Kalishman, Rebecca Monnette, Sanjeev Arora
PROBLEM: This study was designed to develop a deeper understanding of the learning and social processes that take place during the simulation-based medical education for practicing providers as part of the Project ECHO® model, known as Mock ECHO training. The ECHO model is utilized to expand access to care of common and complex diseases by supporting the education of primary care providers with an interprofessional team of specialists via videoconferencing networks. INTERVENTION: Mock ECHO trainings are conducted through a train the trainer model targeted at leaders replicating the ECHO model at their organizations...
April 16, 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29630412/translation-transcultural-adaptation-and-validation-of-the-empathy-spirituality-and-wellness-in-medicine-scale-to-the-brazilian-portuguese-language
#16
Alexander Cangussu Silva, Oscarina da Silva Ezequiel, Rodolfo Furlan Damiano, Alessandra Lamas Granero Lucchetti, Lisabeth Fisher DiLalla, J Kevin Dorsey, Giancarlo Lucchetti
Construct: The Empathy, Spirituality, and Wellness in Medicine Scale (ESWIM) is a 43-item multidimensional scale developed to investigate different dimensions of physicians and medical students. BACKGROUND: Medical education research requires the use of several different instruments with dozens of items that evaluate each construct separately, making their application slow and increasing the likelihood of students providing a large number of incomplete or missing responses. To provide an alternative measure, this study aims to translate, adapt, and validate the multidimensional ESWIM instrument for Brazilian medical students...
April 9, 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29608109/what-experiences-in-medical-school-trigger-professional-identity-development
#17
Denise Kay, Andrea Berry, Nicholas A Coles
Phenomenon: This qualitative inquiry used conceptual change theory as a theoretical lens to illuminate experiences in medical school that trigger professional identity formation. According to conceptual change theory, changes in personal conceptualizations are initiated when cognitive disequilibrium is introduced. We sought to identify the experiences that trigger cognitive disequilibrium and to subsequently describe students' perceptions of self-in-profession prior to the experience; the nature of the experience; and, when applicable, the outcomes of the experience...
April 2, 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29364752/positive-outcomes-of-optimizing-student-preceptor-continuity-in-a-traditional-block-clerkship
#18
Jennifer L Biggs, Jamie S Sutherell, Rochelle Remus, Eric S Armbrecht, Marta A King
PROBLEM: Student-preceptor discontinuity during 3rd-year clerkships limits the quality and quantity of supervision, teaching, and feedback. Although longitudinal integrative clerkships increase continuity and are associated with improved student and preceptor experience, they require schoolwide curricular reform. Alternative innovations enhancing student-preceptor relationships within the constraints of a traditional block clerkship may demonstrate similar benefits. INTERVENTION: We piloted a continuity-enhanced general pediatric ambulatory schedule during 2 consecutive clerkship blocks in 2013...
April 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29324048/peer-observation-of-rounds-leads-to-collegial-discussion-of-teaching
#19
J Rush Pierce, Patrick Rendón, Deepti Rao
PROBLEM: Faculty in the Division of Hospital Medicine provide most of the clinical teaching for learners at our institution. The majority of these faculty are Assistant Professors with limited formal instruction in clinical teaching. Previous Divisional strategies to improve clinical teaching ability included discussion of effective teaching behaviors, developing written expectations for teaching faculty, and instituting seminars on effective clinical teaching. Heretofore, the Division had not utilized a direct observation exercise...
April 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29240463/assessing-the-validity-of-a-multidisciplinary-mini-clinical-evaluation-exercise
#20
Susan Humphrey-Murto, Mylène Côté, Debra Pugh, Timothy J Wood
Construct: The purpose of this study was to provide validity evidence for the mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) as an assessment tool for clinical skills in the workplace. BACKGROUND: Previous research has demonstrated validity evidence for the mini-CEX, but most studies were carried out in internal medicine or single disciplines, therefore limiting generalizability of the findings. If the mini-CEX is to be used in multidisciplinary contexts, then validity evidence should be gathered in similar settings...
April 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
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