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Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27897678/a-tale-of-two-temporal-coding-strategies-common-and-dissociable-brain-regions-involved-in-recency-versus-associative-temporal-order-retrieval-strategies
#1
Jennifer S Lieberman, Colin T Kyle, Amber Schedlbauer, Jared Stokes, Arne D Ekstrom
Numerous studies indicate the importance of the hippocampus to temporal order retrieval. However, behavioral studies suggest that there are different ways to retrieve temporal order information from encoded sequences, one involving an associative strategy (retrieving associations using neighboring items in a list) and another involving a recency strategy (determining which of two items came first). It remains unresolved, however, whether both strategies recruit the hippocampus or only associative strategies, consistent with the hippocampus's role in relational processing...
November 29, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27897677/cognitive-training-in-the-elderly-bottlenecks-and-new-avenues
#2
Nahid Zokaei, Christopher MacKellar, Giedrė Čepukaitytė, Eva Zita Patai, Anna Christina Nobre
Development of measures to preserve cognitive function or even reverse cognitive decline in the ever-growing elderly population is the focus of many research and commercial efforts. One such measure gaining in popularity is the development of computer-based interventions that "exercise" cognitive functions. Computer-based cognitive training has the potential to be specific and flexible, accommodates feedback, and is highly accessible. As in most budding fields, there are still considerable inconsistencies across methodologies and results, as well as a lack of consensus on a comprehensive assessment protocol...
November 29, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27897676/the-effects-of-face-inversion-and-face-race-on-the-p100-erp
#3
Clara Colombatto, Gregory McCarthy
Research about the neural basis of face recognition has investigated the timing and anatomical substrates of different stages of face processing. Scalp-recorded ERP studies of face processing have focused on the N170, an ERP with a peak latency of ∼170 msec that has long been associated with the initial structural encoding of faces. However, several studies have reported earlier ERP differences related to faces, suggesting that face-specific processes might occur before N170. Here, we examined the influence of face inversion and face race on the timing of face-sensitive scalp-recorded ERPs by examining neural responses to upright and inverted line-drawn and luminance-matched White and Black faces in a sample of White participants...
November 29, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27897675/mediofrontal-negativity-signals-unexpected-timing-of-salient-outcomes
#4
Sara Garofalo, Christopher Timmermann, Simone Battaglia, Martin E Maier, Giuseppe di Pellegrino
The medial pFC (mPFC) and ACC have been consistently implicated in learning predictions of future outcomes and signaling prediction errors (i.e., unexpected deviations from such predictions). A computational model of ACC/mPFC posits that these prediction errors should be modulated by outcomes occurring at unexpected times, even if the outcomes themselves are predicted. However, unexpectedness per se is not the only variable that modulates ACC/mPFC activity, as studies reported its sensitivity to the salience of outcomes...
November 29, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27897674/dopamine-alters-the-fidelity-of-working-memory-representations-according-to-attentional-demands
#5
Sean James Fallon, Nahid Zokaei, Agnes Norbury, Sanjay G Manohar, Masud Husain
Capacity limitations in working memory (WM) necessitate the need to effectively control its contents. Here, we examined the effect of cabergoline, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist, on WM using a continuous report paradigm that allowed us to assess the fidelity with which items are stored. We assessed recall performance under three different gating conditions: remembering only one item, being cued to remember one target among distractors, and having to remember all items. Cabergoline had differential effects on recall performance according to whether distractors had to be ignored and whether mnemonic resources could be deployed exclusively to the target...
November 29, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27897673/soap-opera-self-as-object-and-agent-in-prioritizing-attention
#6
Grace Truong, Rebecca M Todd
A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that multiple sources of salience tune attentional sets toward aspects of the environment, including affectively and motivationally significant categories of stimuli such as angry faces and reward-associated target locations. Recent evidence further indicates that objects that have gained personal significance through ownership can elicit similar attentional prioritization. Here we discuss current research on sources of attentional prioritization that shape our awareness of the visual world from moment to moment and the underlying neural systems and contextualize what is known about attentional prioritization of our possessions within that research...
November 29, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27897672/acute-exercise-modulates-feature-selective-responses-in-human-cortex
#7
Tom Bullock, James C Elliott, John T Serences, Barry Giesbrecht
An organism's current behavioral state influences ongoing brain activity. Nonhuman mammalian and invertebrate brains exhibit large increases in the gain of feature-selective neural responses in sensory cortex during locomotion, suggesting that the visual system becomes more sensitive when actively exploring the environment. This raises the possibility that human vision is also more sensitive during active movement. To investigate this possibility, we used an inverted encoding model technique to estimate feature-selective neural response profiles from EEG data acquired from participants performing an orientation discrimination task...
November 29, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27897671/high-intensity-interval-exercise-promotes-motor-cortex-disinhibition-and-early-motor-skill-consolidation
#8
Ellen L Stavrinos, James P Coxon
Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibition shapes motor cortex output, gates synaptic plasticity in the form of long-term potentiation, and plays an important role in motor learning. Remarkably, recent studies have shown that acute cardiovascular exercise can improve motor memory, but the cortical mechanisms are not completely understood. We investigated whether an acute bout of lower-limb high-intensity interval (HIT) exercise could promote motor memory formation in humans through changes in cortical inhibition within the hand region of the primary motor cortex...
November 29, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27897670/boosting-cognition-effects-of-multiple-session-transcranial-direct-current-stimulation-on-working-memory
#9
Lotte J Talsma, Henryk A Kroese, Heleen A Slagter
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising tool for neurocognitive enhancement. Several studies have shown that just a single session of tDCS over the left dorsolateral pFC (lDLPFC) can improve the core cognitive function of working memory (WM) in healthy adults. Yet, recent studies combining multiple sessions of anodal tDCS over lDLPFC with verbal WM training did not observe additional benefits of tDCS in subsequent stimulation sessions nor transfer of benefits to novel WM tasks posttraining...
November 29, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27897669/domain-general-stroop-performance-and-hemispheric-asymmetries-a-resting-state-eeg-study
#10
Ettore Ambrosini, Antonino Vallesi
The ability to suppress irrelevant information while executing a task or interference resistance is a function of pFC that is critical for successful goal-directed human behavior. In the study of interference resistance and, more generally, executive functions, two key questions are still open: Does pFC contribute to cognitive control abilities through lateralized but domain-general mechanisms or through hemispheric specialization of domain-specific processes? And what are the underlying causes of interindividual differences in executive control performance? To shed light on these issues, here we employed an interindividual difference approach to investigate whether participants' hemispheric asymmetry in resting-state electrophysiological brain dynamics may reflect their variability in domain-general interference resistance...
November 29, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27897668/global-enhancement-but-local-suppression-in-feature-based-attention
#11
Norman Forschack, Søren K Andersen, Matthias M Müller
A key property of feature-based attention is global facilitation of the attended feature throughout the visual field. Previously, we presented superimposed red and blue randomly moving dot kinematograms (RDKs) flickering at a different frequency each to elicit frequency-specific steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) that allowed us to analyze neural dynamics in early visual cortex when participants shifted attention to one of the two colors. Results showed amplification of the attended and suppression of the unattended color as measured by SSVEP amplitudes...
November 29, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27791433/representational-dynamics-of-facial-viewpoint-encoding
#12
Tim C Kietzmann, Anna L Gert, Frank Tong, Peter König
Faces provide a wealth of information, including the identity of the seen person and social cues, such as the direction of gaze. Crucially, different aspects of face processing require distinct forms of information encoding. Another person's attentional focus can be derived based on a view-dependent code. In contrast, identification benefits from invariance across all viewpoints. Different cortical areas have been suggested to subserve these distinct functions. However, little is known about the temporal aspects of differential viewpoint encoding in the human brain...
October 28, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27791432/intermodal-attention-shifts-in-multimodal-working-memory
#13
Tobias Katus, Anna Grubert, Martin Eimer
Attention maintains task-relevant information in working memory (WM) in an active state. We investigated whether the attention-based maintenance of stimulus representations that were encoded through different modalities is flexibly controlled by top-down mechanisms that depend on behavioral goals. Distinct components of the ERP reflect the maintenance of tactile and visual information in WM. We concurrently measured tactile (tCDA) and visual contralateral delay activity (CDA) to track the attentional activation of tactile and visual information during multimodal WM...
October 28, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27791431/neuronal-oscillations-indicate-sleep-dependent-changes-in-the-cortical-memory-trace
#14
Moritz Köster, Holger Finger, Maren Kater, Christoph Schenk, Thomas Gruber
Sleep promotes the consolidation of newly acquired associative memories. Here we used neuronal oscillations in the human EEG to investigate sleep-dependent changes in the cortical memory trace. The retrieval activity for object-color associations was assessed immediately after encoding and after 3 hr of sleep or wakefulness. Sleep had beneficial effects on memory performance and led to reduced event-related theta and gamma power during the retrieval of associative memories. Furthermore, event-related alpha suppression was attenuated in the wake group for memorized and novel stimuli...
October 28, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27779911/neural-systems-underlying-individual-differences-in-intertemporal-decision-making
#15
Amanda Elton, Christopher T Smith, Michael H Parrish, Charlotte A Boettiger
Excessively choosing immediate over larger future rewards, or delay discounting (DD), associates with multiple clinical conditions. Individual differences in DD likely depend on variations in the activation of and functional interactions between networks, representing possible endophenotypes for associated disorders, including alcohol use disorders. Numerous fMRI studies have probed the neural bases of DD, but investigations of large-scale networks remain scant. We addressed this gap by testing whether activation within large-scale networks during Now/Later decision-making predicts individual differences in DD...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27779910/decoding-dynamic-brain-patterns-from-evoked-responses-a-tutorial-on-multivariate-pattern-analysis-applied-to-time-series-neuroimaging-data
#16
Tijl Grootswagers, Susan G Wardle, Thomas A Carlson
Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) or brain decoding methods have become standard practice in analyzing fMRI data. Although decoding methods have been extensively applied in brain-computer interfaces, these methods have only recently been applied to time series neuroimaging data such as MEG and EEG to address experimental questions in cognitive neuroscience. In a tutorial style review, we describe a broad set of options to inform future time series decoding studies from a cognitive neuroscience perspective...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27779909/early-cross-modal-plasticity-in-adults
#17
Luca Lo Verde, Maria Concetta Morrone, Claudia Lunghi
It is known that, after a prolonged period of visual deprivation, the adult visual cortex can be recruited for nonvisual processing, reflecting cross-modal plasticity. Here, we investigated whether cross-modal plasticity can occur at short timescales in the typical adult brain by comparing the interaction between vision and touch during binocular rivalry before and after a brief period of monocular deprivation, which strongly alters ocular balance favoring the deprived eye. While viewing dichoptically two gratings of orthogonal orientation, participants were asked to actively explore a haptic grating congruent in orientation to one of the two rivalrous stimuli...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27779908/states-of-mind-characterizing-the-neural-bases-of-focus-and-mind-wandering-through-dynamic-functional-connectivity
#18
Benjamin W Mooneyham, Michael D Mrazek, Alissa J Mrazek, Kaita L Mrazek, Dawa T Phillips, Jonathan W Schooler
During tasks that require continuous engagement, the mind alternates between mental states of focused attention and mind-wandering. Existing research has assessed the functional connectivity of intrinsic brain networks underlying the experience and training of these mental states using "static" approaches that assess connectivity across an entire task. To disentangle the functional connectivity between brain regions as the mind fluctuates between discrete brain states, we employed a dynamic functional connectivity approach that characterized brain activity using a sliding window...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27779907/the-neurocognitive-cost-of-enhancing-cognition-with-methylphenidate-improved-distractor-resistance-but-impaired-updating
#19
Sean James Fallon, Marieke E van der Schaaf, Niels Ter Huurne, Roshan Cools
A balance has to be struck between supporting distractor-resistant representations in working memory and allowing those representations to be updated. Catecholamine, particularly dopamine, transmission has been proposed to modulate the balance between the stability and flexibility of working memory representations. However, it is unclear whether drugs that increase catecholamine transmission, such as methylphenidate, optimize this balance in a task-dependent manner or bias the system toward stability at the expense of flexibility (or vice versa)...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27779906/medial-prefrontal-medial-temporal-theta-phase-coupling-in-dynamic-spatial-imagery
#20
Raphael Kaplan, Daniel Bush, James A Bisby, Aidan J Horner, Sofie S Meyer, Neil Burgess
Hippocampal-medial prefrontal interactions are thought to play a crucial role in mental simulation. Notably, the frontal midline/medial pFC (mPFC) theta rhythm in humans has been linked to introspective thought and working memory. In parallel, theta rhythms have been proposed to coordinate processing in the medial temporal cortex, retrosplenial cortex (RSc), and parietal cortex during the movement of viewpoint in imagery, extending their association with physical movement in rodent models. Here, we used noninvasive whole-head MEG to investigate theta oscillatory power and phase-locking during the 18-sec postencoding delay period of a spatial working memory task, in which participants imagined previously learned object sequences either on a blank background (object maintenance), from a first-person viewpoint in a scene (static imagery), or moving along a path past the objects (dynamic imagery)...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
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