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Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29244642/sex-sleep-deprivation-and-the-anxious-brain
#1
Andrea N Goldstein-Piekarski, Stephanie M Greer, Jared M Saletin, Allison G Harvey, Leanne M Williams, Matthew P Walker
Insufficient sleep is a known trigger of anxiety. However, not everyone experiences these effects to the same extent. One determining factor is sex, wherein women experience a greater anxiogenic impact in response to sleep loss than men. However, the underlying brain mechanism(s) governing this sleep-loss-induced anxiety increase, including the markedly different reaction in women and men, is unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that structural brain morphology in a discrete network of emotion-relevant regions represents one such explanatory factor...
December 15, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29244641/pavlovian-control-of-escape-and-avoidance
#2
Alexander J Millner, Samuel J Gershman, Matthew K Nock, Hanneke E M den Ouden
To survive in complex environments, animals need to have mechanisms to select effective actions quickly, with minimal computational costs. As perhaps the computationally most parsimonious of these systems, Pavlovian control accomplishes this by hardwiring specific stereotyped responses to certain classes of stimuli. It is well documented that appetitive cues initiate a Pavlovian bias toward vigorous approach; however, Pavlovian responses to aversive stimuli are less well understood. Gaining a deeper understanding of aversive Pavlovian responses, such as active avoidance, is important given the critical role these behaviors play in several psychiatric conditions...
December 15, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29244640/cross-frequency-phase-amplitude-coupling-as-a-mechanism-for-temporal-orienting-of-attention-in-childhood
#3
Giovanni Mento, Duncan E Astle, Gaia Scerif
Temporal orienting of attention operates by biasing the allocation of cognitive and motor resources in specific moments in time, resulting in the improved processing of information from expected compared with unexpected targets. Recent findings have shown that temporal orienting operates relatively early across development, suggesting that this attentional mechanism plays a core role for human cognition. However, the exact neurophysiological mechanisms allowing children to attune their attention over time are not well understood...
December 15, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29244639/oscillatory-mechanisms-of-response-conflict-elicited-by-color-and-motion-direction-an-individual-differences-approach
#4
Marlies E Vissers, K Richard Ridderinkhof, Michael X Cohen, Heleen A Slagter
Goal-directed behavior requires control over automatic behavior, for example, when goal-irrelevant information from the environment captures an inappropriate response and conflicts with the correct, goal-relevant action. Neural oscillations in the theta band (∼6 Hz) measured at midfrontal electrodes are thought to form an important substrate of the detection and subsequent resolution of response conflict. Here, we examined the extent to which response conflict and associated theta-band activity depend on the visual stimulus feature dimension that triggers the conflict...
December 15, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29244638/memory-contextualization-the-role-of-prefrontal-cortex-in-functional-integration-across-item-and-context-representational-regions
#5
Wei Zhang, Vanessa A van Ast, Floris Klumpers, Karin Roelofs, Erno J Hermans
Memory recall is facilitated when retrieval occurs in the original encoding context. This context dependency effect likely results from the automatic binding of central elements of an experience with contextual features (i.e., memory "contextualization") during encoding. However, despite a vast body of research investigating the neural correlates of explicit associative memory, the neural interactions during encoding that predict implicit context-dependent memory remain unknown. Twenty-six participants underwent fMRI during encoding of salient stimuli (faces), which were overlaid onto unique background images (contexts)...
December 15, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29244637/u-shaped-relation-between-prestimulus-alpha-and-poststimulus-gamma-band-power-in-temporal-tactile-perception-in-the-human-somatosensory-cortex
#6
Marc André Wittenberg, Thomas J Baumgarten, Alfons Schnitzler, Joachim Lange
Neuronal oscillations are a ubiquitous phenomenon in the human nervous system. Alpha-band oscillations (8-12 Hz) have been shown to correlate negatively with attention and performance, whereas gamma-band oscillations (40-150 Hz) correlate positively. Here, we studied the relation between prestimulus alpha-band power and poststimulus gamma-band power in a suprathreshold tactile discrimination task. Participants received two electrical stimuli to their left index finger with different SOAs (0 msec, 100 msec, intermediate SOA, intermediate SOA ± 10 msec)...
December 15, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29244636/event-related-electroencephalographic-lateralizations-mark-individual-differences-in-spatial-and-nonspatial-visual-selection
#7
Iris Wiegand, Natan Napiorkowski, Thomas Töllner, Anders Petersen, Thomas Habekost, Hermann J Müller, Kathrin Finke
Selective attention controls the distribution of our visual system's limited processing resources to stimuli in the visual field. Two independent parameters of visual selection can be quantified by modeling an individual's performance in a partial-report task based on the computational theory of visual attention (TVA): (i) top-down control α, the relative attentional weighting of relevant over irrelevant stimuli, and (ii) spatial bias wλ, the relative attentional weighting of stimuli in the left versus right hemifield...
December 15, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29211656/the-neural-basis-of-successful-word-reading-in-aphasia
#8
Sara B Pillay, William L Gross, William W Graves, Colin Humphries, Diane S Book, Jeffrey R Binder
OBJECTIVE: Understanding the neural basis of recovery from stroke is a major research goal. Many functional neuroimaging studies have identified changes in brain activity in people with aphasia, but it is unclear whether these changes truly support successful performance or merely reflect increased task difficulty. We addressed this problem by examining differences in brain activity associated with correct and incorrect responses on an overt reading task. On the basis of previous proposals that semantic retrieval can assist pronunciation of written words, we hypothesized that recruitment of semantic areas would be greater on successful trials...
December 6, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29211655/spectral-diversity-in-default-mode-network-connectivity-reflects-behavioral-state
#9
Michael M Craig, Anne E Manktelow, Barbara J Sahakian, David K Menon, Emmanuel A Stamatakis
Default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity is thought to occur primarily in low frequencies (<0.1 Hz), resulting in most studies removing high frequencies during data preprocessing. In contrast, subtractive task analyses include high frequencies, as these are thought to be task relevant. An emerging line of research explores resting fMRI data at higher-frequency bands, examining the possibility that functional connectivity is a multiband phenomenon. Furthermore, recent studies suggest DMN involvement in cognitive processing; however, without a systematic investigation of DMN connectivity during tasks, its functional contribution to cognition cannot be fully understood...
December 6, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29211654/does-extensive-training-at-individuating-novel-objects-in-adulthood-lead-to-visual-expertise-the-role-of-facelikeness
#10
Aliette Lochy, Friederike G S Zimmermann, Renaud Laguesse, Verena Willenbockel, Bruno Rossion, Quoc C Vuong
Human adults have a rich visual experience with seeing human faces since birth, which may contribute to the acquisition of perceptual processes that rapidly and automatically individuate faces. According to a generic visual expertise hypothesis, extensive experience with nonface objects may similarly lead to efficient processing of objects at the individual level. However, whether extensive training in adulthood leads to visual expertise remains debated. One key issue is the extent to which the acquisition of visual expertise depends on the resemblance of objects to faces in terms of the spatial configuration of parts...
December 6, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29211653/exploring-the-organization-of-semantic-memory-through-unsupervised-analysis-of-event-related-potentials
#11
Marijn van Vliet, Marc M Van Hulle, Riitta Salmelin
Modern multivariate methods have enabled the application of unsupervised techniques to analyze neurophysiological data without strict adherence to predefined experimental conditions. We demonstrate a multivariate method that leverages priming effects on the evoked potential to perform hierarchical clustering on a set of word stimuli. The current study focuses on the semantic relationships that play a key role in the organization of our mental lexicon of words and concepts. The N400 component of the event-related potential is considered a reliable neurophysiological response that is indicative of whether accessing one concept facilitates subsequent access to another (i...
December 6, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29211652/changes-in-frontoparietotemporal-connectivity-following-do-as-i-do-imitation-training-in-chimpanzees-pan-troglodytes
#12
Sarah M Pope, Jared P Taglialatela, Sara A Skiba, William D Hopkins
Human imitation is supported by an underlying "mirror system" principally composed of inferior frontal, inferior parietal, and superior temporal cortical regions. Across primate species, differences in frontoparietotemporal connectivity have been hypothesized to explain phylogenetic variation in imitative abilities. However, if and to what extent these regions are involved in imitation in nonhuman primates is unknown. We hypothesized that "Do As I Do" (DAID) imitation training would enhance white matter integrity within and between frontoparietotemporal regions...
December 6, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29211651/cortico-cerebellar-networks-drive-sensorimotor-learning-in-speech
#13
Daniel R Lametti, Harriet J Smith, Phoebe Freidin, Kate E Watkins
The motor cortex and cerebellum are thought to be critical for learning and maintaining motor behaviors. Here we use transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to test the role of the motor cortex and cerebellum in sensorimotor learning in speech. During productions of "head," "bed," and "dead," the first formant of the vowel sound was altered in real time toward the first formant of the vowel sound in "had," "bad," and "dad." Compensatory changes in first and second formant production were used as a measure of motor adaptation...
December 6, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29211650/selective-interference-with-syntactic-encoding-during-sentence-production-by-direct-electrocortical-stimulation-of-the-inferior-frontal-gyrus
#14
Edward F Chang, Garret Kurteff, Stephen M Wilson
Cortical stimulation mapping (CSM) has provided important insights into the neuroanatomy of language, because of its high spatial and temporal resolution, and the causal relationships that can be inferred from transient disruption of specific functions. Almost all CSM studies to date have focused on word level processes such as naming, comprehension, and repetition. In this study, we used CSM to identify sites where stimulation interfered selectively with syntactic encoding during sentence production. Fourteen patients undergoing left-hemisphere neurosurgery participated in the study...
December 6, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29211649/hearing-shapes-event-related-potentials-reveal-the-time-course-of-auditory-visual-sensory-substitution
#15
Christian Graulty, Orestis Papaioannou, Phoebe Bauer, Michael A Pitts, Enriqueta Canseco-Gonzalez
In auditory-visual sensory substitution, visual information (e.g., shape) can be extracted through strictly auditory input (e.g., soundscapes). Previous studies have shown that image-to-sound conversions that follow simple rules [such as the Meijer algorithm; Meijer, P. B. L. An experimental system for auditory image representation. Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 39, 111-121, 1992] are highly intuitive and rapidly learned by both blind and sighted individuals. A number of recent fMRI studies have begun to explore the neuroplastic changes that result from sensory substitution training...
December 6, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29160744/modulation-of-neural-oscillatory-activity-during-dynamic-face-processing
#16
Elaine Foley, Gina Rippon, Carl Senior
Various neuroimaging and neurophysiological methods have been used to examine neural activation patterns in response to faces. However, much of previous research has relied on static images of faces, which do not allow a complete description of the temporal structure of face-specific neural activities to be made. More recently, insights are emerging from fMRI studies about the neural substrates that underpin our perception of naturalistic dynamic face stimuli, but the temporal and spectral oscillatory activity associated with processing dynamic faces has yet to be fully characterized...
November 21, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29160743/left-inferior-frontal-gyrus-sensitivity-to-phonetic-competition-in-receptive-language-processing-a-comparison-of-clear-and-conversational-speech
#17
Xin Xie, Emily Myers
The speech signal is rife with variations in phonetic ambiguity. For instance, when talkers speak in a conversational register, they demonstrate less articulatory precision, leading to greater potential for confusability at the phonetic level compared with a clear speech register. Current psycholinguistic models assume that ambiguous speech sounds activate more than one phonological category and that competition at prelexical levels cascades to lexical levels of processing. Imaging studies have shown that the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) is modulated by phonetic competition between simultaneously activated categories, with increases in activation for more ambiguous tokens...
November 21, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29131745/ventrolateral-prefrontal-cortex-updates-chosen-value-according-to-choice-set-size
#18
Juri Fujiwara, Nobuo Usui, Satoshi Eifuku, Toshio Iijima, Masato Taira, Ken-Ichiro Tsutsui, Philippe N Tobler
Having chosen an item typically increases the subjective value of the chosen item, and people generally enjoy making choices from larger choice sets. However, having too many items to choose from can reduce the value of chosen items, for example, because of conflict or choice difficulty. In this study, we investigated the effects of choice set size on behavioral and neural value updating (revaluation) of the chosen item. In the scanner, participants selected items from choice sets of various sizes (one, two, four, or eight items)...
November 13, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29131744/not-doomed-to-repeat-enhanced-mpfc-tracking-of-errors-promotes-adaptive-behavior-during-adolescence
#19
Ethan M McCormick, Eva H Telzer
Feedback information is one of the most powerful forces that promotes learning, providing guidance for changes to ongoing behavioral patterns. Previous examinations of feedback learning have largely relied on explicit feedback based on task performance. However, learning is not restricted to explicit feedback and likely involves other forms of more subtle feedback cues. One potential form of this kind of learning may involve internally generated feedback in response to error commission. Whether this error-related response prompts neural and behavioral adaptation that overlaps with, or is distinct from, those evoked by external feedback is largely unknown...
November 13, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29131743/integration-and-temporal-processing-of-asynchronous-audiovisual-speech
#20
David M Simon, Mark T Wallace
Multisensory integration of visual mouth movements with auditory speech is known to offer substantial perceptual benefits, particularly under challenging (i.e., noisy) acoustic conditions. Previous work characterizing this process has found that ERPs to auditory speech are of shorter latency and smaller magnitude in the presence of visual speech. We sought to determine the dependency of these effects on the temporal relationship between the auditory and visual speech streams using EEG. We found that reductions in ERP latency and suppression of ERP amplitude are maximal when the visual signal precedes the auditory signal by a small interval and that increasing amounts of asynchrony reduce these effects in a continuous manner...
November 13, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
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