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Development and Psychopathology

Lori N Scott, Maureen Zalewski, Joseph E Beeney, Neil P Jones, Stephanie D Stepp
Etiological models propose that a biological vulnerability to emotional reactivity plays an important role in the development of borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, the physiological and phenomenological components of emotional reactivity that predict the course of BPD symptoms in adolescence are poorly understood. This prospective study examines pupillary and affective responses to maternal feedback as predictors of BPD symptom development in adolescent girls over 18 months. Fifty-seven 16-year-old girls completed a laboratory task in which they heard recorded clips of their own mothers making critical or praising statements about them, as well as neutral statements that did not pertain to them...
October 25, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Bruce J Ellis, Albertine J Oldehinkel, Esther Nederhof
The adaptive calibration model (ACM) is a theory of developmental programing focusing on calibration of stress response systems and associated life history strategies to local environmental conditions. In this article, we tested some key predictions of the ACM in a longitudinal study of Dutch adolescent males (11-16 years old; N = 351). Measures of sympathetic, parasympathetic, and adrenocortical activation, reactivity to, and recovery from social-evaluative stress validated the four-pattern taxonomy of the ACM via latent profile analysis, though with some deviations from expected patterns...
October 24, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Karina Quevedo, Rowena Ng, Hannah Scott, Garry Smyda, Jennifer H Pfeifer, Sandra Malone
Maltreatment is associated with chronic depression, high negative self-attributions, and lifetime psychopathology. Adolescence is a sensitive period for the formation of self-concept. Identifying neurobiomarkers of self-processing in depressed adolescents with and without maltreatment may parse the effects of trauma and depression on self-development and chronic psychopathology. Depressed adolescents (n = 86) maltreated due to omission (DO, n = 13) or commission (DCM, n = 28) or without maltreatment (DC, n = 45), and HCs (HC, n = 37) appraised positive and negative self-descriptors in the scanner...
October 20, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Steven R H Beach, Man Kit Lei, Gene H Brody, Gregory E Miller, Edith Chen, Jelani Mandara, Robert A Philibert
We examined two potentially interacting, connected pathways by which parental supportiveness during early adolescence (ages 1-13) may come to be associated with later African American young adult smoking. The first pathway is between parental supportiveness and young adult stress (age 19), with stress, in turn, predicting increased smoking at age 20. The second pathway is between supportive parenting and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) gene methylation (i.e., TNFm), a proinflammatory epitype, with low levels indicating greater inflammatory potential and forecasting increased risk for smoking in response to young adult stress...
October 20, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Sophie Reijman, Lenneke R A Alink, Laura H C G Compier-De Block, Claudia D Werner, Athanasios Maras, Corine Rijnberk, Marinus H Van Ijzendoorn, Marian J Bakermans-Kranenburg
This study assessed attachment representation and attachment-related autonomic regulation in a sample of 38 maltreating and 35 nonmaltreating mothers. Mothers' state of mind regarding attachment was measured using the Adult Attachment Interview. They further watched an attachment-based comfort paradigm, during which we measured skin conductance and vagal tone. More maltreating mothers (42%) than nonmaltreating mothers (17%) had an unresolved/disoriented attachment classification. Attachment representation was related to physiology during the comfort paradigm: an unresolved state of mind and a nonautonomous classification were associated with a decrease in skin conductance during the comfort paradigm, specifically during the responsive caregiver scenario...
October 20, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Peter A Bos
Variation in the quality of parental care has a tremendous impact on a child's social-emotional development. Research investigating the predictors of this variability in human caregiving behavior has mostly focused on learning mechanisms. Evidence is currently accumulating for the complementary underlying role of steroid hormones and neuropeptides. An overview is provided of the hormones and neuropeptides relevant for human caregiving behavior. Then the developmental factors are described that stimulate variability in sensitivity to these hormones and neuropeptides, which may result in variability in the behavioral repertoire of caregiving...
October 20, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Fatima Tuba Yaylaci, Dante Cicchetti, Fred A Rogosch, Okan Bulut, Susan R Hetzel
The FK506 binding protein 5 gene (FKBP5) has been associated with susceptibility to pathogenic effects of childhood trauma including dissociative symptoms. This study examines the impact of maltreatment on dissociative tendencies in adolescence as moderated by the FKBP5 gene. Dissociative symptoms and variation within FKBP5 were assessed in a high-risk, low socioeconomic status community sample of 279 maltreated and 171 nonmaltreated adolescents. Following the assignment of haplotypes across four single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs3800373, rs9296158, rs1360780, and rs9470080), individuals with one or more copies of the CATT haplotype (N = 230) were grouped together and compared to individuals with zero copies of this haplotype (N = 185)...
October 20, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Hanna Gustafsson, Colleen Doyle, Michelle Gilchrist, Elizabeth Werner, Catherine Monk
The consequences of childhood maltreatment are profound and long lasting. Not only does the victim of abuse suffer as a child, but there is mounting evidence that a history of maltreatment places the next generation at risk for significant psychopathology. Research identifies postnatal factors as affecting this intergenerational transmission of trauma. However, emerging evidence suggests that part of this risk may be transmitted before birth, passed on via abuse-related alterations in the in utero environment that are as yet largely unidentified...
October 20, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Jingwen Liu, Brian Mustanski, Danielle Dick, John Bolland, Darlene A Kertes
Comorbidity of internalizing and externalizing problems and its risk and protective factors have not been well incorporated into developmental research, especially among racial minority youth from high-poverty neighborhoods. The present study identified a latent comorbid factor as well as specific factors underlying internalizing and externalizing problems among 592 African American adolescents living in economically disadvantaged neighborhoods (291 male; M age = 15.9 years, SD = 1.43 years). Stressful life events and racial discrimination were associated with higher comorbid problems, whereas stressful life events and exposure to violence were associated with higher specific externalizing problems...
October 19, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Gerald J Haeffel, Sascha Hein, Amanda Square, Donna Macomber, Maria Lee, John Chapman, Elena L Grigorenko
This study reports findings from the administration of a social problem-solving training (SPST) intervention to juvenile detainees in the Connecticut Youth Detainee Program. SPST is a cognitive behavioral intervention that teaches children and youth how to more effectively cope with interpersonal stress and conflict. In the current study, we tested whether SPST could decrease depressive symptoms in a sample of detained adolescent offenders. The study used a randomized-control design with detention staff administering the intervention...
October 19, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Steven R H Beach, Gene H Brody, Allen W Barton, Robert A Philibert
In the current manuscript, we provide an overview of a research program at the University of Georgia's Center for Family Research designed to expand upon rapid and ongoing developments in the fields of genetics and epigenetics. By placing those developments in the context of translational research on family and community determinants of health and well-being among rural African Americans, we hope to identify novel, modifiable environments and biological processes. In the first section of the article, we review our earlier work on genotypic variation effects on the association between family context and mental and physical health outcomes as well as differential responses to family-based intervention...
October 3, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Gene H Brody, Tianyi Yu, Steven R H Beach
For the past quarter century, scientists at the Center for Family Research at the University of Georgia have conducted research designed to promote understanding of normative developmental trajectories among low socioeconomic status African American children, youths, and young adults. In this paper, we describe a recent expansion of this research program using longitudinal, epidemiological studies and randomized prevention trials to test hypotheses about the origins of disease among rural African American youths...
October 3, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Audrey R Tyrka, Kathryn K Ridout, Stephanie H Parade
Early childhood experiences have lasting effects on development, including the risk for psychiatric disorders. Research examining the biologic underpinnings of these associations has revealed the impact of childhood maltreatment on the physiologic stress response and activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. A growing body of literature supports the hypothesis that environmental exposures mediate their biological effects via epigenetic mechanisms. Methylation, which is thought to be the most stable form of epigenetic change, is a likely mechanism by which early life exposures have lasting effects...
October 3, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Elena L Grigorenko, Sergey A Kornilov, Oksana Yu Naumova
The last decade has been marked by an increased interest in relating epigenetic mechanisms to complex human behaviors, although this interest has not been balanced, accentuating various types of affective and primarily ignoring cognitive functioning. Recent animal model data support the view that epigenetic processes play a role in learning and memory consolidation and help transmit acquired memories even across generations. In this review, we provide an overview of various types of epigenetic mechanisms in the brain (DNA methylation, histone modification, and noncoding RNA action) and discuss their impact proximally on gene transcription, protein synthesis, and synaptic plasticity and distally on learning, memory, and other cognitive functions...
October 3, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Katherine B Ehrlich, Kharah M Ross, Edith Chen, Gregory E Miller
Accumulating evidence suggests that the experience of early life adversity is a risk factor for a range of poor outcomes across development, including poor physical health in adulthood. The biological embedding model of early adversity (Miller, Chen, & Parker, 2011) suggests that early adversity might become embedded within immune cells known as monocytes/macrophages, programming them to be overly aggressive to environmental stimuli and insensitive to inhibitory signals, creating a "proinflammatory phenotype" that increases vulnerability to chronic diseases across the life span...
October 3, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Michael Rutter
Translational research focuses on innovation in healthcare settings, but this is a two-way process that may have implications for either treatment or prevention. Smoking and lung cancer and the fetal alcohol syndrome are used as examples. Experimental medicine that budges basic and clinical science often constitutes a key way forward. Areas of scientific progress and challenge are discussed in relation to drug action, social cognition, cognitive neuroscience, molecular genetics, gene-environment interaction, and epigenetics...
October 3, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Dante Cicchetti, Susan Hetzel, Fred A Rogosch, Elizabeth D Handley, Sheree L Toth
In the present investigation, differential methylation analyses of the whole genome were conducted among a sample of 548 school-aged low-income children (47.8% female, 67.7% Black, M age = 9.40 years), 54.4% of whom had a history of child maltreatment. In the context of a summer research camp, DNA samples via saliva were obtained. Using GenomeStudio, Methylation Module, and the Illumina Custom Model, differential methylation analyses revealed a pattern of greater methylation at low methylation sites (n = 197 sites) and medium methylation sites (n = 730 sites) and less methylation at high methylation sites (n = 907 sites) among maltreated children...
October 3, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Dante Cicchetti, Susan Hetzel, Fred A Rogosch, Elizabeth D Handley, Sheree L Toth
A genome-wide methylation study was conducted among a sample of 114 infants (M age = 13.2 months, SD = 1.08) of low-income urban women with (n = 73) and without (n = 41) major depressive disorder. The Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array with a GenomeStudio Methylation Module and Illumina Custom model were used to conduct differential methylation analyses. Using the 5.0 × 10-7 p value, 2,119 loci were found to be significantly different between infants of depressed and nondepressed mothers. Infants of depressed mothers had greater methylation at low methylation sites (0%-29%) compared to infants of nondepressed mothers...
September 30, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Jay Belsky, Idan Shalev
Two independent lines of inquiry suggest that growing up under conditions of contextual adversity (e.g., poverty and household chaos) accelerates aging and undermines long-term health. Whereas work addressing the developmental origins of health and disease highlights accelerated-aging effects of contextual adversity on telomere erosion, that informed by an evolutionary analysis of reproductive strategies highlights such effects with regard to pubertal development (in females). That both shorter telomeres early in life and earlier age of menarche are associated with poor health later in life raises the prospect, consistent with evolutionary life-history theory, that these two bodies of theory and research are tapping into the same evolutionary-developmental process whereby longer term health costs are traded off for increased probability of reproducing before dying via a process of accelerated aging...
September 30, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Renaud Massart, Zsofia Nemoda, Matthew J Suderman, Sheila Sutti, Angela M Ruggiero, Amanda M Dettmer, Stephen J Suomi, Moshe Szyf
Studies in rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans suggest that epigenetic processes mediate between early life experiences and adult phenotype. However, the normal evolution of epigenetic programs during child development, the effect of sex, and the impact of early life adversity on these trajectories are not well understood. This study mapped the genome-wide DNA methylation changes in CD3+ T lymphocytes from rhesus monkeys from postnatal day 14 through 2 years of age in both males and females and determined the impact of maternal deprivation on the DNA methylation profile...
September 30, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
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