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Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30089939/mikomeseng-leprosy-legitimacy-and-francoist-repression-in-spanish-guinea
#1
David Brydan
The Mikomeseng leprosy settlement in Spanish Guinea (present-day Equatorial Guinea) was widely promoted during the 1940s and 1950s as the embodiment of the Francoist 'civilizing mission' in Africa. Its prominence reflected the important role which colonial health and social policy played in establishing the legitimacy of the Franco regime, and particularly in helping to overcome its international isolation in the immediate post-war era. But a major protest by leprosy sufferers in 1946 revealed the everyday violence underpinning life in Mikomeseng, showing how the language of welfare and social justice which pervaded Francoist propaganda masked the reality of a coercive colonial system...
August 2018: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30089938/personalities-preferences-and-practicalities-educating-nurses-in-wound-sepsis-in-the-british-hospital-1870-1920
#2
Claire L Jones, Marguerite Dupree, Iain Hutchison, Susan Gardiner, Anne Marie Rafferty
The history of nursing education has often been portrayed as the subordination of nursing to medicine. Yet, as scholars are increasingly acknowledging, the professional boundaries between medicine and nursing were fluid in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, when both scientific knowledge and systems of nurse training were in flux. Through its focus on the role of medical practitioners in educating nurses in wound sepsis at four British hospitals between 1870 and 1920, this article attempts to further unite histories of medicine and nursing...
August 2018: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29991853/socialist-utopia-in-practice-everyday-life-and-medical-authority-in-a-hungarian-polio-hospital
#3
Dora Vargha
Based on oral history interviews, medical literature, hospital newsletters, memoirs and news media, this article explores the ways in which ideals of socialism interacted with medical practice in polio care in 1950s Hungary. Through the everyday life of polio hospitals, it argues that the specific care that polio demanded from hospital staff, parents and children, resonated with state socialist political discourses of gender equality and the breakdown of class barriers and conventional hierarchies in medicine...
May 2018: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29713123/the-sounds-and-sights-of-natural-childbirth-films-and-records-in-antenatal-preparation-classes-1950s-1980s
#4
Paula A Michaels
Film and sound recordings are a ubiquitous part of the antenatal preparation courses that serve as a rite of passage to parenthood in Western Europe and North America. This article analyses a sample of these didactic tools used in classes from the 1950s to the 1980s, the heyday of the natural childbirth movement. These audio-visual artefacts both reflected and conditioned expectations for women's behaviour during labour and birth through their representation of pain. They demonstrate changing norms in the role of the father, but show how physician authority-and male authority more broadly-remained largely unchallenged...
February 2018: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29713122/russia-and-the-medical-drug-trade-in-the-seventeenth-century
#5
Clare Griffin
This article deals with the trade in medicines into Russia in the seventeenth century. Both the early modern medical drug trade, and Russian medicine, have previously received substantial attention, but no work has thus far been undertaken on the Russian angle of the drug trade. Drawing on previously unused documents, this article traces the kinds of drugs acquired by the Moscow court. In contrast to the dominant view of official Russian medicine as divorced from native healing practices and fundamentally reliant upon Western European trends, these documents reveal that drugs were sourced as locally as Moscow markets, and from as far afield as East Asia and the Americas, but that not all drugs were accepted...
February 2018: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29713121/-his-whole-nature-requires-development-education-school-life-and-deafness-in-wales-1850-1914
#6
Mike Mantin
The history of deaf education has focused heavily on one major issue: the role of sign language and the rise of oralism as a means of suppressing the use of signs. This was a crucial debate which affected the lives of deaf children, informed social and cultural attitudes towards deafness and in many cases spurred resistance from deaf communities. However, other aspects of daily school life and the curriculum of Victorian and Edwardian deaf schools have rarely been commented upon. Focusing on the Cambrian Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, Wales' first deaf institution, this article will examine the teaching of writing and moral, religious and industrial education, all of which constructed an image of the intellectual and moral capabilities of the deaf child...
November 2017: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29670320/hyperactive-around-the-world-the-history-of-adhd-in-global-perspective
#7
Matthew Smith
A recent study has claimed that the global rate of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is 5.29%. Any variation in such rates in specific studies, argue the authors, was due to methodological problems, rather than differences in the actual distribution of ADHD. Such reports strengthen the flawed notion that ADHD is a universal and essential disorder, found in all human populations across time and place. While it is true that the concept of ADHD has spread from the USA, where it emerged during the late 1950s, to most corners of the globe, such superficial pronouncements mask profound differences in how ADHD has been interpreted in different countries and regions...
November 2017: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29713120/concepts-diagnosis-and-the-history-of-medicine-historicising-ian-hacking-and-munchausen-syndrome
#8
Chris Millard
Concepts used by historians are as historical as the diagnoses or categories that are studied. The example of Munchausen syndrome (deceptive presentation of illness in order to adopt the 'sick role') is used to explore this. Like most psychiatric diagnoses, Munchausen syndrome is not thought applicable across time by social historians of medicine. It is historically specific, drawing upon twentieth-century anthropology and sociology to explain motivation through desire for the 'sick role'. Ian Hacking's concepts of 'making up people' and 'looping effects' are regularly utilised outside of the context in which they are formed...
August 2017: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29713119/john-wickham-s-new-surgery-minimally-invasive-therapy-innovation-and-approaches-to-medical-practice-in-twentieth-century-britain
#9
Sally Frampton, Roger L Kneebone
The term 'minimally invasive' was coined in 1986 to describe a range of procedures that involved making very small incisions or no incision at all for diseases traditionally treated by open surgery. We examine this major shift in British medical practice as a means of probing the nature of surgical innovation in the twentieth century. We first consider how concerns regarding surgical invasiveness had long been present in surgery, before examining how changing notions of post-operative care formed a foundation for change...
August 2017: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29713118/being-well-looking-ill-childbirth-and-the-return-to-health-in-seventeenth-century-england
#10
Leah Astbury
For a month after childbirth, the authors of medical and religious prescriptive literature instructed new mothers to keep to their beds. During this time they were expected to bleed away the bodily remnants of pregnancy. At the end of this month writers considered women 'well'. Bleeding, in this definition, was commensurate with recovery. This article shows that although in prescriptive material, maternal health was measured according to this process of purging, for early modern middling and upper sort women and their families, the bodily effects of childbearing continued to impede their ability to return to normal household tasks and behaviours long after the ritual month of 'lying-in' had ended...
August 2017: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29628625/-everybody-likes-a-drink-nobody-likes-a-drunk-alcohol-health-education-and-the-public-in-1970s-britain
#11
Alex Mold
This article examines the development of alcohol health education in Britain during the 1970s, using this as a way to explore the nature of public health and the place of the public within it. Focusing on a set of local health education campaigns, an expert committee report on alcohol prevention and a public consultation exercise on alcohol, the article highlights the presence of three different 'publics'. Health education campaigns tended to focus on the individual drinker, but the drinking habits of the whole population were also of concern...
August 1, 2017: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29203968/-i-should-have-thought-that-wales-was-a-wet-part-of-the-world-drought-rural-communities-and-public-health-1870-1914
#12
Keir Waddington
From 1884 onwards, Britain experienced a series of major droughts, which reached their peak in the 'Long Drought' (1890-1909). Despite being imagined as a wet part of the world, rural Wales was hard hit as many communities did not have access to reliable water supplies. As medical officers of health and newspapers talked about water famines, alarm focused on questions of purity and disease as drought was presented as a serious health risk. Using rural Wales as a case study, this essay explores vulnerabilities to water scarcity during periods of drought to examine the material and socio-political impact of water scarcity and the resulting public health problems faced in rural areas...
August 2017: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29713117/-a-change-of-heart-racial-politics-scientific-metaphor-and-coverage-of-1968-interracial-heart-transplants-in-the-african-american-press
#13
Maya Overby Koretzky
This paper explores the African American response to an interracial heart transplant in 1968 through a close reading of the black newspaper press. This methodological approach provides a window into African American perceptions of physiological difference between the races, or lack thereof, as it pertained to both personal identity and race politics. Coverage of the first interracial heart transplant, which occurred in apartheid South Africa, was multifaceted. Newspapers lauded the transplant as evidence of physiological race equality while simultaneously mobilising the language of differing 'black' and 'white' hearts to critique racist politics through the metaphor of a 'change of heart'...
May 2017: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29713116/hiding-in-the-pub-to-cutting-the-cord-men-s-presence-at-childbirth-in-britain-c-1940s-2000s
#14
Laura King
Since the 1940s, men's presence at childbirth has changed from being out of the question to not only very common but often presented as highly valuable. This article examines this shift, charting how many men were present at their children's births over recent decades, considering how medical practitioners influenced men's participation, and analysing what meanings parents gave to this experience. It suggests a number of factors led to the relatively rapid move towards the acceptance of men's presence in the delivery room, but highlights this was not a simple transformation as a first glance at the figures would suggest...
May 2017: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29713115/-if-experts-differ-what-are-we-to-do-in-the-matter-the-medico-legal-investigation-of-gunshot-wounds-in-a-1927-scottish-murder-trial
#15
Nicholas Duvall
This article uses a notorious criminal trial, that of John Donald Merrett for the murder of his mother, as a case study to explore forensic medicine's treatment of gunshot wounding in pre-war Scotland. This topic, which has hitherto received little attention from historians, provides insight into two issues facing the discipline at this time. First, the competing attempts by prosecution and defence expert witnesses to recreate the wound in a laboratory setting, in order to determine the distance from which the shot had been fired, exposed the uncertainties surrounding the application of a well-known laboratory technique for which no fully agreed-upon protocol existed...
May 2017: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29713114/-i-am-not-very-well-i-feel-nearly-mad-when-i-think-of-you-male-jealousy-murder-and-broadmoor-in-late-victorian-britain
#16
Jade Shepherd
This article compares the representations of jealousy in popular culture, medical and legal literature, and in the trials and diagnoses of men who murdered or attempted to murder their wives or sweethearts before being found insane and committed into Broadmoor Criminal Lunatic Asylum between 1864 and 1900. It is shown that jealousy was entrenched in Victorian culture, but marginalised in medical and legal discourse and in the courtroom until the end of the period, and was seemingly cast aside at Broadmoor. As well as providing a detailed examination of varied representations of male jealousy in late-Victorian Britain, the article contributes to understandings of the emotional lives of the working-class, and the causes and representations of working-class male madness...
May 2017: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29075051/a-trauma-doctor-s-practice-in-nineteenth-century-china-the-medical-cases-of-hu-tingguang
#17
Yi-Li Wu
This paper analyses the medical activities of Hu Tingguang, an early nineteenth-century Chinese healer who specialized in treating traumatic injuries. Hu aimed to improve the state of medical knowledge about injuries by writing a comprehensive treatise titled Compilation of Teachings on Traumatology , completed in 1815. This work notably included a set of medical cases describing the experiences of Hu and his father, which Hu used to teach readers how to employ and adapt different therapies: bone setting, petty surgery, and drugs...
May 1, 2017: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28473731/a-disability-act-the-vaccine-damage-payments-act-1979-and-the-british-government-s-response-to-the-pertussis-vaccine-scare
#18
Gareth Millward
The Vaccine Damage Payments Act 1979 provided a lump-sum social security benefit to children who had become severely disabled as a result of vaccination. It came in the wake of a scare over the safety of the whooping cough (pertussis) vaccine. Yet very little has been written about it. Existing literature focuses more on the public health and medical aspects of both the Act and the scare. This article uses material from the archives of disability organisations and official documents to show that this Act should be seen as part of the history of post-war British disability policy...
May 2017: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27956759/the-records-of-stannington-children-s-sanatorium-charting-half-a-century-of-tuberculosis-care
#19
Karen Rushton
This article explores the historic records of Stannington Children's Tuberculosis Sanatorium focusing largely on the 5,041 patient records and 14,660 radiographs that make up the bulk of the collection and span from the 1930s to the 1960s. By taking a handful of illustrations from within the collection, it aims to demonstrate the various avenues of research available as well as the unique nature of the collection owing to its focus on children, with the comprehensive nature of its records making it invaluable...
November 2016: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27956758/weighting-for-health-management-measurement-and-self-surveillance-in-the-modern-household
#20
Roberta Bivins, Hilary Marland
Histories of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century medicine emphasise the rise of professional and scientific authority, and suggest a decline in domestic health initiatives. Exploring the example of weight management in Britain, we argue that domestic agency persisted and that new regimes of measurement and weighing were adapted to personal and familial preferences as they entered the household. Drawing on print sources and objects ranging from prescriptive literature to postcards and 'personal weighing machines', the article examines changing practices of self-management as cultural norms initially dictated by ideals of body shape and function gradually incorporated quantified targets...
November 2016: Social History of Medicine: the Journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
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