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Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132679/food-allergy
#1
EDITORIAL
J Andrew Bird
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132678/the-quest-for-food-allergy-treatments-on-course-and-gaining-steam%C3%A2-finally
#2
EDITORIAL
Stephen A Tilles
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132677/adjuvant-therapies-in-food-immunotherapy
#3
REVIEW
Wenyin Loh, Mimi Tang
Finding an effective curative treatment for food allergy is a research priority. Although oral immunotherapy (OIT) is effective at inducing desensitization, the temporary nature of this effect and high rates of adverse reactions have highlighted a need for novel strategies to improve tolerance induction and safety. One such strategy is the use of an adjuvant together with food immunotherapy to either suppress allergic reactions and/or modulate the underlying allergic immune response. In particular, the use of bacterial adjuvants seems to be a promising means of enhancing OIT-induced sustained unresponsiveness and warrants further investigation...
February 2018: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132676/interventional-therapies-for-the-treatment-of-food-allergy
#4
REVIEW
Christopher P Parrish, Edwin H Kim, J Andrew Bird
Treatment of IgE-mediated food allergies is limited to allergen avoidance and emergency treatment on accidental ingestion, which is not uncommon. In recent years, interest in interventional therapies to treat food allergy has increased significantly. Although oral, sublingual, and epicutaneous immunotherapy have shown promise in studies, none is approved as therapy for food allergy to date and questions remain regarding efficacy, safety, dosing, and duration of therapy.
February 2018: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132675/the-role-of-baked-egg-and-milk-in-the-diets-of-allergic-children
#5
REVIEW
Melissa L Robinson, Bruce J Lanser
Baked egg and baked milk are tolerated by most children who are allergic to hen's egg and cow's milk. Incorporating baked goods into the diets of allergic children may help them outgrow their primary allergy more quickly, with changes observed akin to immunotherapy. Benefits may also include increased quality of life and improved nutritional status. The search for a reliable biomarker to predict tolerance to baked goods is ongoing. Most children with a milk or egg allergy who are not previously tolerating egg or milk in baked goods should be offered an observed oral food challenge...
February 2018: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132674/food-allergy-management
#6
REVIEW
Carla M Davis, John M Kelso
The management of food allergies requires the cooperation of the food allergic person, physician, family, and social contacts. For children, school management of food allergies is a key component of the overall approach. Recognition of the signs and symptoms of allergic reactions and preparation to administer the appropriate treatment of mild and severe symptoms in the event of accidental exposure is necessary. Avoidance of food allergens is facilitated by label reading and dietary guidance is extremely important to minimize nutritional deficiencies...
February 2018: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132673/diagnosis-of-food-allergy
#7
REVIEW
Malika Gupta, Amanda Cox, Anna Nowak-Węgrzyn, Julie Wang
Food allergy diagnosis remains challenging. Most standard methods are unable to differentiate sensitization from clinical allergy. Recognizing food allergy is of utmost importance to prevent life-threatening reactions. On the other hand, faulty interpretation of tests leads to overdiagnosis and unnecessary food avoidances. Highly predictive models have been established for major food allergens based on skin prick testing and food-specific immunoglobulin E but are lacking for most other foods. Although many newer diagnostic techniques are improving the accuracy of food allergy diagnostics, an oral food challenge remains the only definitive method of confirming a food allergy...
February 2018: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132672/oral-tolerance-development-and-maintenance
#8
REVIEW
Erik Wambre, David Jeong
The gastrointestinal tract has an abundant mucosal immune system to develop and maintain oral tolerance. The oral route of administration takes advantage of the unique set of immune cells and pathways involved in the induction of oral tolerance. Food allergy results from a loss of oral tolerance toward ingested antigens. Oral immunotherapy is thought to initiate desensitization through interaction of an allergen with mucosal dendritic cells that initiate downstream immune system modulation through regulatory T cells and effector T cells...
February 2018: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132671/unproven-diagnostic-tests-for-food-allergy
#9
REVIEW
Catherine Hammond, Jay A Lieberman
The gold standard for diagnosis of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated food allergy remains the oral food challenge, with serum IgE testing and skin prick testing serving as acceptable alternatives. However, the increase in prevalence of food allergy (both physician diagnosed and patient suspected) has led patients to pursue a variety of other alternative diagnostic procedures for suspected food allergy, which are reviewed in this article. These procedures (IgG testing, electrodermal testing, cytotoxic testing, provocation/neutralization, and applied kinesiology) have largely been unproven and may lead to unnecessary elimination diets...
February 2018: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132670/food-protein-induced-enterocolitis-syndrome
#10
REVIEW
Theresa A Bingemann, Puja Sood, Kirsi M Järvinen
Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is a non-IgE-mediated food allergy that usually presents in infancy. Cow's milk, soy, and grains are the most common food triggers. FPIES can present as a medical emergency with symptoms including delayed persistent emesis or diarrhea that can lead to severe dehydration and hemodynamic instability with abnormal laboratory markers. Diagnosis can often be made based on clinical history and noted improvement in symptoms once the suspected triggers have been removed from the diet, with oral food challenge as the gold standard for confirmation of diagnosis in unclear cases...
February 2018: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132669/epidemiology-of-food-allergy
#11
REVIEW
Joan H Dunlop, Corinne A Keet
Understanding the epidemiology of food allergy is complicated by the difficulty of identifying it on a large scale. The prevalence of food allergy is higher in younger age groups and decreases with age. Allergy to peanut and egg seems to be more common in Northern Europe, the United States, Canada and Australia compared with Southern Europe, Eastern Europe and Asia, whereas shellfish and fish allergies may be more common in Asia. The rate of transient unrecognized food allergy may be high and variable recognition of food allergy may explain some of the differences seen in food allergy prevalence...
February 2018: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132668/diagnosis-and-management-of-eosinophilic-esophagitis
#12
REVIEW
Jeffrey M Wilson, Emily C McGowan
Unlike traditional food allergies, immunoglobulin E (IgE) is not a key mediator of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Nonetheless, foods antigens are important triggers of EoE, and allergists play an important role in management of this chronic disease. This review addresses insights into the diagnosis and management as it relates to our evolving understanding about the pathogenesis of EoE.
February 2018: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132667/complementary-and-alternative-medicine-for-treatment-of-food-allergy
#13
REVIEW
Xiu-Min Li
The prevalence of food allergy is increasing. Food allergy can be life threatening and there is no approved treatment available. Allergen avoidance and rescue medication remain the sole management tools. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is common in the United States. However, research into safety and efficacy for food allergy is limited. Continued scientific research into food allergy herbal formula 2 (FAHF-2), refined methods of formulation, purified compounds, and other modalities are needed...
February 2018: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132666/prevention-of-food-allergies
#14
REVIEW
Jennifer J Koplin, Rachel L Peters, Katrina J Allen
This review summarizes the current state of play with regard to food allergy prevention. Food allergy prevention strategies focused on promoting timely introduction of allergenic foods (predominantly peanut) into the infant diet have recently been introduced in several countries. Additional prevention strategies currently under investigation include optimizing infant vitamin D levels, modulating the gut microbiota through use of probiotics, and preventing eczema to reduce the risk of food sensitization through a damaged skin barrier...
February 2018: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28965644/drug-hypersensitivity-and-desensitizations
#15
EDITORIAL
Mariana C Castells
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2017: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28965643/drug-hypersensitivity-broadening-horizons
#16
EDITORIAL
Stephen A Tilles
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2017: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28965642/erratum
#17
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2017: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28965641/severe-delayed-drug-reactions-role-of-genetics-and-viral-infections
#18
REVIEW
Rebecca Pavlos, Katie D White, Celestine Wanjalla, Simon A Mallal, Elizabeth J Phillips
Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a significant source of patient morbidity and mortality and represent a major burden to health care systems and drug development. Up to 50% of such reactions are preventable. Although many ADRs can be predicted based on the on-target pharmacologic activity, ADRs arising from drug interactions with off-target receptors are recognized. Off-target ADRs include the immune-mediated ADRs (IM-ADRs) and pharmacologic drug effects. In this review, we discuss what is known about the immunogenetics and pathogenesis of IM-ADRs and the hypothesized role of heterologous immunity in the development of IM-ADRs...
November 2017: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28965640/progestogen-hypersensitivity-an-evidence-based-approach-to-diagnosis-and-management-in-clinical-practice
#19
REVIEW
Dinah Foer, Kathleen M Buchheit
Heterogeneous presentations of disease pose particular diagnostic and management challenges to the clinician. Progestogen hypersensitivity (PH) classically consists of hypersensitivity symptoms to endogenous progesterone during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. However, with the rise of assisted fertility and the exponential growth in the use of exogenous progestins for contraception, PH's prevalence and symptom heterogeneity have increased. In this article, we focus on the clinical approach to PH diagnosis with an emphasis on key elements of the history, physical, and testing modalities...
November 2017: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28965639/subcutaneous-injectable-drugs-hypersensitivity-and-desensitization-insulin-and-monoclonal-antibodies
#20
REVIEW
Sevim Bavbek, Min Jung Lee
Injectable drugs, including monoclonal antibodies, are becoming crucial components in the management of chronic diseases. The most common side effects are local reactions at the site of administration. With the increased and prolonged use of these medications, we are seeing increased reports of hypersensitivity reactions. The aim of this article is to discuss the signs and symptoms of these reactions as well as management, which may involve desensitization for 3 commonly encountered injectable drugs: tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors (etanercept and adalimumab), insulin, and omalizumab...
November 2017: Immunology and Allergy Clinics of North America
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