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Trends in Ecology & Evolution

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30655014/no-evidence-that-men-s-voice-pitch-signals-formidability
#1
LETTER
D R Feinberg, B C Jones, M M Armstrong
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 14, 2019: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30655011/detecting-the-true-extent-of-introgression-during-anthropogenic-hybridization
#2
REVIEW
S Eryn McFarlane, Josephine M Pemberton
Hybridization among naturally separate taxa is increasing owing to human impact, and can result in taxon loss. Previous classification of anthropogenic hybridization has largely ignored the case of bimodal hybrid zones, in which hybrids commonly mate with parental species, resulting in many backcrossed individuals with a small proportion of introgressed genome. Genetic markers can be used to detect such hybrids, but until recently too few markers have been used to detect the true extent of introgression. Recent studies of wolves and trout have employed thousands of markers to reveal previously undetectable backcrosses...
January 14, 2019: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30651180/advances-in-microclimate-ecology-arising-from-remote-sensing
#3
REVIEW
Florian Zellweger, Pieter De Frenne, Jonathan Lenoir, Duccio Rocchini, David Coomes
Microclimates at the land-air interface affect the physiological functioning of organisms which, in turn, influences the structure, composition, and functioning of ecosystems. We review how remote sensing technologies that deliver detailed data about the structure and thermal composition of environments are improving the assessment of microclimate over space and time. Mapping landscape-level heterogeneity of microclimate advances our ability to study how organisms respond to climate variation, which has important implications for understanding climate-change impacts on biodiversity and ecosystems...
January 13, 2019: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30642697/biodiversity-databases-in-the-future-reply-to-cene-fi%C3%A5-er
#4
LETTER
Andreas Kroh, Mark J Costello, Tammy Horton
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 11, 2019: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30638913/aquatic-life-history-trajectories-are-shaped-by-selection-not-oxygen-limitation
#5
LETTER
Dustin J Marshall, Craig R White
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 10, 2019: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30635138/the-impact-of-climate-change-on-fertility
#6
REVIEW
Benjamin S Walsh, Steven R Parratt, Ary A Hoffmann, David Atkinson, Rhonda R Snook, Amanda Bretman, Tom A R Price
Rising global temperatures are threatening biodiversity. Studies on the impact of temperature on natural populations usually use lethal or viability thresholds, termed the 'critical thermal limit' (CTL). However, this overlooks important sublethal impacts of temperature that could affect species' persistence. Here we discuss a critical but overlooked trait: fertility, which can deteriorate at temperatures less severe than an organism's lethal limit. We argue that studies examining the ecological and evolutionary impacts of climate change should consider the 'thermal fertility limit' (TFL) of species; we propose that a framework for the design of TFL studies across taxa be developed...
January 8, 2019: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30655012/female-fish-grow-bigger-let-s-deal-with-it
#7
LETTER
Daniel Pauly
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 7, 2019: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30611399/reproductive-hyperallometry-does-not-challenge-mechanistic-growth-models
#8
LETTER
Michael Kearney
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2, 2019: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30611398/ten-years-on-a-review-of-the-first-global-conservation-horizon-scan
#9
REVIEW
William J Sutherland, Erica Fleishman, Mick Clout, David W Gibbons, Fiona Lickorish, Lloyd S Peck, Jules Pretty, Mark Spalding, Nancy Ockendon
Our first horizon scan, conducted in 2009, aimed to identify novel but poorly known issues with potentially significant effects on global conservation of biological diversity. Following completion of the tenth annual scan, we reviewed the 15 topics identified a decade ago and assessed their development in the scientific literature and news media. Five topics, including microplastic pollution, synthetic meat, and environmental applications of mobile-sensing technology, appeared to have had widespread salience and effects...
January 2, 2019: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30594323/does-men-s-voice-pitch-signal-formidability-a-reply-to-feinberg-et-al
#10
LETTER
David A Puts, Toe Aung
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 26, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30591209/the-latitudinal-diversity-gradient-novel-understanding-through-mechanistic-eco-evolutionary-models
#11
REVIEW
Mikael Pontarp, Lynsey Bunnefeld, Juliano Sarmento Cabral, Rampal S Etienne, Susanne A Fritz, Rosemary Gillespie, Catherine H Graham, Oskar Hagen, Florian Hartig, Shan Huang, Roland Jansson, Odile Maliet, Tamara Münkemüller, Loïc Pellissier, Thiago F Rangel, David Storch, Thorsten Wiegand, Allen H Hurlbert
The latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) is one of the most widely studied patterns in ecology, yet no consensus has been reached about its underlying causes. We argue that the reasons for this are the verbal nature of existing hypotheses, the failure to mechanistically link interacting ecological and evolutionary processes to the LDG, and the fact that empirical patterns are often consistent with multiple explanations. To address this issue, we synthesize current LDG hypotheses, uncovering their eco-evolutionary mechanisms, hidden assumptions, and commonalities...
December 24, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30587392/collaborative-databasing-should-be-encouraged
#12
LETTER
Cene Fišer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 23, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30583805/evolution-in-the-light-of-fitness-landscape-theory
#13
REVIEW
Inês Fragata, Alexandre Blanckaert, Marco António Dias Louro, David A Liberles, Claudia Bank
By formalizing the relationship between genotype or phenotype and fitness, fitness landscapes harbor information on molecular and evolutionary constraints. The shape of the fitness landscape determines the potential for adaptation and speciation, as well as our ability to predict evolution. Consequently, fitness landscape theory has been invoked across the natural sciences and across multiple levels of biological organization. We review here the existing literature on fitness landscape theory by describing the main types of fitness landscape models, and highlight how these are increasingly integrated into an applicable statistical framework for the study of evolution...
December 21, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30580972/research-weaving-visualizing-the-future-of-research-synthesis
#14
REVIEW
Shinichi Nakagawa, Gihan Samarasinghe, Neal R Haddaway, Martin J Westgate, Rose E O'Dea, Daniel W A Noble, Malgorzata Lagisz
We propose a new framework for research synthesis of both evidence and influence, named research weaving. It summarizes and visualizes information content, history, and networks among a collection of documents on any given topic. Research weaving achieves this feat by combining the power of two methods: systematic mapping and bibliometrics. Systematic mapping provides a snapshot of the current state of knowledge, identifying areas needing more research attention and those ready for full synthesis. Bibliometrics enables researchers to see how pieces of evidence are connected, revealing the structure and development of a field...
December 20, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30573193/early-career-researchers-embrace-data-sharing
#15
Hamish A Campbell, Mariana A Micheli-Campbell, Vinay Udyawer
A request for raw data from the corresponding authors of 771 animal biotelemetry-focused manuscripts, published between 1995 and 2015, highlighted a difference in data sharing practices across researcher career levels. Responses were positive in only 11% of requests made to corresponding authors (CAs) that were senior researchers, while 72% of responses were positive when CAs were early career researchers (ECRs), demonstrating that the majority of senior researchers perceived little benefit from the public data archiving of their published research, while they often remain the data custodian...
December 17, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30527795/testing-the-sexual-and-social-benefits-of-cooperation-in-animals
#16
REVIEW
Rita Covas, Claire Doutrelant
Theoretical models show that sexual and social selection can stabilise cooperation. However, field tests of these mechanisms have been difficult to conduct and the results are mixed. We discuss the conceptual and practical difficulties associated with testing the role of social and sexual selection on cooperation and argue that there are alternative ways of examining these hypotheses. Specifically, approaches based on the classic theories of sexual selection and signalling, and recent developments in the field of behavioural syndromes, provide mechanisms to insure the reliability of cooperation...
December 7, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30655013/approaching-ecological-sustainability-in-the-emerging-insects-as-food-industry
#17
REVIEW
Åsa Berggren, Anna Jansson, Matthew Low
The emerging insects-as-food industry is increasingly promoted as a sustainable alternative to other animal protein production systems. However, the exact nature of its environmental benefits are uncertain because of the overwhelming lack of knowledge concerning almost every aspect of production: from suitable species, their housing and feed requirements, and potential for accidental release. If ecological sustainability is to be a hallmark of mass insect rearing for consumption, ecologists need to engage in research related to sustainability criteria that are directly linked to key elements of the development of the industry...
December 5, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30554808/a-horizon-scan-of-emerging-issues-for-global-conservation-in-2019
#18
REVIEW
William J Sutherland, Steven Broad, Stuart H M Butchart, Stewart J Clarke, Alexandra M Collins, Lynn V Dicks, Helen Doran, Nafeesa Esmail, Erica Fleishman, Nicola Frost, Kevin J Gaston, David W Gibbons, Alice C Hughes, Zhigang Jiang, Ruth Kelman, Becky LeAnstey, Xavier le Roux, Fiona A Lickorish, Kathryn A Monk, Diana Mortimer, James W Pearce-Higgins, Lloyd S Peck, Nathalie Pettorelli, Jules Pretty, Colleen L Seymour, Mark D Spalding, Jonathan Wentworth, Nancy Ockendon
We present the results of our tenth annual horizon scan. We identified 15 emerging priority topics that may have major positive or negative effects on the future conservation of global biodiversity, but currently have low awareness within the conservation community. We hope to increase research and policy attention on these areas, improving the capacity of the community to mitigate impacts of potentially negative issues, and maximise the benefits of issues that provide opportunities. Topics include advances in crop breeding, which may affect insects and land use; manipulations of natural water flows and weather systems on the Tibetan Plateau; release of carbon and mercury from melting polar ice and thawing permafrost; new funding schemes and regulations; and land-use changes across Indo-Malaysia...
December 5, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30527960/the-future-of-complementarity-disentangling-causes-from-consequences
#19
REVIEW
Kathryn E Barry, Liesje Mommer, Jasper van Ruijven, Christian Wirth, Alexandra J Wright, Yongfei Bai, John Connolly, Gerlinde B De Deyn, Hans de Kroon, Forest Isbell, Alexandru Milcu, Christiane Roscher, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen, Bernhard Schmid, Alexandra Weigelt
Evidence suggests that biodiversity supports ecosystem functioning. Yet, the mechanisms driving this relationship remain unclear. Complementarity is one common explanation for these positive biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships. Yet, complementarity is often indirectly quantified as overperformance in mixture relative to monoculture (e.g., 'complementarity effect'). This overperformance is then attributed to the intuitive idea of complementarity or, more specifically, to species resource partitioning...
December 4, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30527959/ecosystem-traits-linking-functional-traits-to-macroecology
#20
REVIEW
Nianpeng He, Congcong Liu, Shilong Piao, Lawren Sack, Li Xu, Yiqi Luo, Jinsheng He, Xingguo Han, Guangsheng Zhou, Xuhui Zhou, Yi Lin, Qiang Yu, Shirong Liu, Wei Sun, Shuli Niu, Shenggong Li, Jiahui Zhang, Guirui Yu
As the range of studies on macroecology and functional traits expands, integration of traits into higher-level approaches offers new opportunities to improve clarification of larger-scale patterns and their mechanisms and predictions using models. Here, we propose a framework for quantifying 'ecosystem traits' and means to address the challenges of broadening the applicability of functional traits to macroecology. Ecosystem traits are traits or quantitative characteristics of organisms (plants, animals, and microbes) at the community level expressed as the intensity (or density) normalized per unit land area...
December 4, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
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