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Trends in Ecology & Evolution

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30220471/better-scientific-writing-does-not-need-linguistic-alchemy-response-to-doubleday-and-connell-2017
#1
LETTER
Patrick J O'Connor, Margaret A Cargill
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 13, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30213660/let-scientific-writing-evolve-not-stagnate
#2
LETTER
Zoë A Doubleday, Sean D Connell
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 10, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30213659/sustainable-biodiversity-databasing-international-collaborative-dynamic-centralised
#3
Mark J Costello, Tammy Horton, Andreas Kroh
The World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) is a sustainable model of international collaboration around a centralised database that provides expert validated biodiversity data freely online. This model could be replicated for the over 1.2 million terrestrial and freshwater species to improve quality control and data management in biology and ecology globally.
September 10, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30209011/macroecology-to-unite-all-life-large-and-small
#4
REVIEW
Ashley Shade, Robert R Dunn, Shane A Blowes, Petr Keil, Brendan J M Bohannan, Martina Herrmann, Kirsten Küsel, Jay T Lennon, Nathan J Sanders, David Storch, Jonathan Chase
Macroecology is the study of the mechanisms underlying general patterns of ecology across scales. Research in microbial ecology and macroecology have long been detached. Here, we argue that it is time to bridge the gap, as they share a common currency of species and individuals, and a common goal of understanding the causes and consequences of changes in biodiversity. Microbial ecology and macroecology will mutually benefit from a unified research agenda and shared datasets that span the entirety of the biodiversity of life and the geographic expanse of the Earth...
September 9, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30177306/mycorrhizal-markets-firms-and-co-ops
#5
REVIEW
Ronald Noë, E Toby Kiers
The nutrient exchange mutualism between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMFs) and their host plants qualifies as a biological market, but several complications have hindered its appropriate use. First, fungal 'trading agents' are hard to identify because AMFs are potentially heterokaryotic, that is, they may contain large numbers of polymorphic nuclei. This means it is difficult to define and study a fungal 'individual' acting as an independent agent with a specific trading strategy. Second, because nutrient exchanges occur via communal structures (arbuscules), this temporarily reduces outbidding competition and transaction costs and hence resembles exchanges among divisions of firms, rather than traditional trade on markets...
August 31, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30213658/what-conservation-does
#6
REVIEW
Laurent Godet, Vincent Devictor
New agendas for conservation are regularly proposed based on the ground that existing strategies are overly pessimistic, restricted to biodiversity hotspots, and inappropriate to halt biodiversity loss. However, little empirical evidence supports such claims. Here we review the 12971 papers published in the leading conservation journals during the last 15 years to assess what conservation actually does. Although conservation research is affected by specific bias, conservation is playing a major role in providing empirical evidence of human impacts on biodiversity...
August 30, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30173951/cracking-the-code-of-biodiversity-responses-to-past-climate-change
#7
REVIEW
David Nogués-Bravo, Francisco Rodríguez-Sánchez, Luisa Orsini, Erik de Boer, Roland Jansson, Helene Morlon, Damien A Fordham, Stephen T Jackson
How individual species and entire ecosystems will respond to future climate change are among the most pressing questions facing ecologists. Past biodiversity dynamics recorded in the paleoecological archives show a broad array of responses, yet significant knowledge gaps remain. In particular, the relative roles of evolutionary adaptation, phenotypic plasticity, and dispersal in promoting survival during times of climate change have yet to be clarified. Investigating the paleo-archives offers great opportunities to understand biodiversity responses to future climate change...
August 27, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30166069/outstanding-challenges-in-the-transferability-of-ecological-models
#8
REVIEW
Katherine L Yates, Phil J Bouchet, M Julian Caley, Kerrie Mengersen, Christophe F Randin, Stephen Parnell, Alan H Fielding, Andrew J Bamford, Stephen Ban, A Márcia Barbosa, Carsten F Dormann, Jane Elith, Clare B Embling, Gary N Ervin, Rebecca Fisher, Susan Gould, Roland F Graf, Edward J Gregr, Patrick N Halpin, Risto K Heikkinen, Stefan Heinänen, Alice R Jones, Periyadan K Krishnakumar, Valentina Lauria, Hector Lozano-Montes, Laura Mannocci, Camille Mellin, Mohsen B Mesgaran, Elena Moreno-Amat, Sophie Mormede, Emilie Novaczek, Steffen Oppel, Guillermo Ortuño Crespo, A Townsend Peterson, Giovanni Rapacciuolo, Jason J Roberts, Rebecca E Ross, Kylie L Scales, David Schoeman, Paul Snelgrove, Göran Sundblad, Wilfried Thuiller, Leigh G Torres, Heroen Verbruggen, Lifei Wang, Seth Wenger, Mark J Whittingham, Yuri Zharikov, Damaris Zurell, Ana M M Sequeira
Predictive models are central to many scientific disciplines and vital for informing management in a rapidly changing world. However, limited understanding of the accuracy and precision of models transferred to novel conditions (their 'transferability') undermines confidence in their predictions. Here, 50 experts identified priority knowledge gaps which, if filled, will most improve model transfers. These are summarized into six technical and six fundamental challenges, which underlie the combined need to intensify research on the determinants of ecological predictability, including species traits and data quality, and develop best practices for transferring models...
August 27, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30146326/the-necessity-of-multitrophic-approaches-in-community-ecology
#9
REVIEW
Sebastian Seibold, Marc W Cadotte, J Scott MacIvor, Simon Thorn, Jörg Müller
Trophic interactions are a fundamental part of ecosystems; yet, most ecological studies focus on single trophic levels and this hampers our ability to detect the underlying mechanisms structuring communities as well as the effects of environmental change. Here, we argue that the historical dominance of studying competition within trophic levels, and the focus on taxonomic groups without differentiating the trophic level, has led to the under-representation of multitrophic research in community ecology. There are many hurdles that challenge multitrophic approaches and we discuss solutions to overcome these...
August 23, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30126619/darwin-sexual-selection-and-the-origins-of-music
#10
Andrea Ravignani
Humans devote ample time to produce and perceive music. How and why this behavioral propensity originated in our species is unknown. For centuries, speculation dominated the study of the evolutionary origins of musicality. Following Darwin's early intuitions, recent empirical research is opening a new chapter to tackle this mystery.
August 17, 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30149911/how-species-boundaries-are-determined-a-response-to-alexander-et-al-trends-in-ecology-evolution-32-7-8-2017
#11
Mark Westoby, Georges Kunstler, Michelle R Leishman, John Morgan
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30098801/keystone-genes
#12
REVIEW
Lotte H Skovmand, Charles C Y Xu, Maria R Servedio, Patrik Nosil, Rowan D H Barrett, Andrew P Hendry
The keystone species concept is used in ecology to describe individual species with disproportionately large effects on their communities. We extend this idea to the level of genes with disproportionately large effects on ecological processes. Such 'keystone genes' (KGs) would underlie traits involved in species interactions or causing critical biotic and/or abiotic changes that influence emergent community and ecosystem properties. We propose a general framework for how KGs could be identified, while keeping KGs under the umbrella of 'ecologically important genes' (EIGs) that also include categories such as 'foundation genes', 'ecosystem engineering genes', and more...
September 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30072217/bridging-scales-allometric-random-walks-link-movement-and-biodiversity-research
#13
REVIEW
Myriam R Hirt, Volker Grimm, Yuanheng Li, Björn C Rall, Benjamin Rosenbaum, Ulrich Brose
Integrating mechanistic models of movement and behavior into large-scale movement ecology and biodiversity research is one of the major challenges in current ecological science. This is mainly due to a large gap between the spatial scales at which these research lines act. Here, we propose to apply trait-based movement models to bridge this gap and generalize movement trajectories across species and ecosystems. We show how to use species traits (e.g., body mass) to generate allometric random walks and illustrate in two worked examples how this facilitates general predictions of species-interaction traits, meta-community structures, and biodiversity patterns...
September 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30031562/expanding-resilience-comparisons-to-address-management-needs-a-response-to-ingrisch-and-bahn
#14
LETTER
Alex C Y Yeung, John S Richardson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30017247/accounting-for-complexity-in-resilience-comparisons-a-reply-to-yeung-and-richardson-and-further-considerations
#15
LETTER
Michael Bahn, Johannes Ingrisch
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30007845/overcoming-the-data-crisis-in-biodiversity-conservation
#16
REVIEW
Holly K Kindsvater, Nicholas K Dulvy, Cat Horswill, Maria-José Juan-Jordá, Marc Mangel, Jason Matthiopoulos
How can we track population trends when monitoring data are sparse? Population declines can go undetected, despite ongoing threats. For example, only one of every 200 harvested species are monitored. This gap leads to uncertainty about the seriousness of declines and hampers effective conservation. Collecting more data is important, but we can also make better use of existing information. Prior knowledge of physiology, life history, and community ecology can be used to inform population models. Additionally, in multispecies models, information can be shared among taxa based on phylogenetic, spatial, or temporal proximity...
September 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30007844/ediacaran-extinction-and-cambrian-explosion
#17
REVIEW
Simon A F Darroch, Emily F Smith, Marc Laflamme, Douglas H Erwin
The Ediacaran-Cambrian (E-C) transition marks the most important geobiological revolution of the past billion years, including the Earth's first crisis of macroscopic eukaryotic life, and its most spectacular evolutionary diversification. Here, we describe competing models for late Ediacaran extinction, summarize evidence for these models, and outline key questions which will drive research on this interval. We argue that the paleontological data suggest two pulses of extinction - one at the White Sea-Nama transition, which ushers in a recognizably metazoan fauna (the 'Wormworld'), and a second pulse at the E-C boundary itself...
September 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30005837/adaptive-networks-for-restoration-ecology
#18
REVIEW
Rafael L G Raimundo, Paulo R Guimarães, Darren M Evans
The urgent need to restore biodiversity and ecosystem functioning challenges ecology as a predictive science. Restoration ecology would benefit from evolutionary principles embedded within a framework that combines adaptive network models and the phylogenetic structure of ecological interactions. Adaptive network models capture feedbacks between trait evolution, species abundances, and interactions to explain resilience and functional diversity within communities. Phylogenetically-structured network data, increasingly available via next-generation sequencing, inform constraints affecting interaction rewiring...
September 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29395512/a-final-warning-to-planet-earth
#19
Guillaume Chapron, Harold Levrel, Yves Meinard, Franck Courchamp
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30055910/evolutionary-consequences-of-social-isolation
#20
REVIEW
Nathan W Bailey, Allen J Moore
Social isolation has profound impacts. Most animal research focuses on negative phenotypic consequences of social isolation within individual lifetimes. Less is known about how it affects genetics, selection, and evolution over longer timescales, though ample indirect evidence suggests that it might. We advocate that evolutionary consequences of social isolation be tested more directly. We suggest that the 'index of social isolation', the mismatch between actual and optimal social interaction experienced by individuals within a population, may play a key role in releasing cryptic genetic variation, adaptation rates, diversification patterns, and ecosystem-level processes...
August 2018: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
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