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Brain, Behavior, and Immunity

Elizabeth A Ellins, D Aled Rees, John E Deanfield, Andrew Steptoe, Julian P Halcox
Stress influences the risk of cardiovascular disease. Acute mental stress can induce both low-grade inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. The relationship between inflammatory responses to stress and future endothelial function is unexplored. Knowledge on the impact of other cardiovascular risk factors, such as dyslipidaemia, on such relationships is also limited We investigated the relationship between inflammatory responses to an acute mental stress challenge and endothelial function plus the influence of dyslipidaemia on the associations...
October 18, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Ruinan Gu, Fali Zhang, Gang Chen, Chaojun Han, Jay Liu, Zhaoxiang Ren, Yi Zhu, John L Waddington, Long Tai Zheng, Xuechu Zhen
Clock (Clk)1/COQ7 is a mitochondrial hydroxylase that is necessary for the biosynthesis of ubiquinone (coenzyme Q or UQ). Here, we investigate the role of Clk1 in neuroinflammation and consequentially dopaminergic (DA) neuron survival. Reduced expression of Clk1 in microglia enhanced the LPS-induced proinflammatory response and promoted aerobic glycolysis. Inhibition of glycolysis abolished Clk1 deficiency-induced hypersensitivity to the inflammatory stimulation. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that mTOR/HIF-1α and ROS/HIF-1α signaling pathways were involved in Clk1 deficiency-induced aerobic glycolysis...
October 18, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Jui-Hung Yen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 17, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Aoife O'Donovan, Ashkan J Ahmadian, Thomas C Neylan, Mark A Pacult, Donald Edmondson, Beth E Cohen
[OBJECTIVE]: Elevated inflammation has been repeatedly observed in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and it may drive the development of both psychiatric symptoms and physical comorbidities. However, it is not clear if elevated inflammation is a feature of both remitted and current PTSD, and little is known about relationships between specific clusters of PTSD symptoms and inflammation. Exaggerated threat sensitivity, as indexed by threat reactivity and avoidance of perceived threats, may be particularly closely associated with inflammation...
October 17, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Linda Witek Janusek, Dina Tell, Noni Gaylord-Harden, Herbert L Mathews
African American men (AAM) who are exposed to trauma and adversity during their early life are at greater risk for poor health over their lifespan. Exposure to adversity during critical developmental windows may embed an epigenetic signature that alters expression of genes that regulate stress response systems, including those genes that regulate the inflammatory response to stress. Such an epigenetic signature may increase risk for diseases exacerbated by inflammation, and may contribute to health disparity...
October 17, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Marianne Ronovsky, Stefanie Berger, Alice Zambon, Sonali N Reisinger, Orsolya Horvath, Arnold Pollak, Claudia Lindtner, Angelika Berger, Daniela D Pollak
Gestational infection is increasingly being recognized for its involvement as causative mechanism in severe developmental brain abnormalities and its contribution to the pathogenesis of psychopathologies later in life. First observations in the widely accepted maternal immune activation (MIA) model based upon the systemic administration of the viral mimetic Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) have recently suggested a transmission of behavioral and transcriptional traits across generations. Although maternal care behavior (MCB) is known as essential mediator of the transgenerational effects of environmental challenges on offspring brain function and behavior, the possible propagation of alterations of MCB resulting from MIA to following generations has not yet been examined...
October 17, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Nicola M Grissom, Robert George, Teresa M Reyes
Nutritional conditions in early life can have a lasting impact on health and disease risk, though the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. In the healthy individual, physiological and behavioral responses to stress are coordinated in such a way as to mobilize resources necessary to respond to the stressor and to terminate the stress response at the appropriate time. Induction of proinflammatory gene expression within the brain is one such example that is initiated in response to both physiological and psychological stressors, and is the focus of the current study...
October 15, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Raphaela Mayerhofer, Esther E Fröhlich, Florian Reichmann, Aitak Farzi, Nora Kogelnik, Eleonore Fröhlich, Wolfgang Sattler, Peter Holzer
Microbial metabolites are known to affect immune system, brain, and behavior via activation of pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Unlike the effect of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the role of other TLR agonists in immune-brain communication is insufficiently understood. We therefore hypothesized that the TLR2 agonist lipoteichoic acid (LTA) causes immune activation in the periphery and brain, stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and has an adverse effect on blood-brain barrier (BBB) and emotional behavior...
October 14, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Claudia Balducci, Angelisa Frasca, Margherita Zotti, Pietro La Vitola, Emanuela Mhillaj, Emanuele Grigoli, Martina Iacobellis, Federica Grandi, Massimo Messa, Laura Colombo, Monica Molteni, Luigia Trabace, Carlo Rossetti, Mario Salmona, Gianluigi Forloni
[Background] Amyloid-β oligomers (AβO) are species mainly involved in the synaptic and cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. Although their action has been described mainly at neuronal level, it is now clear that glial cells govern synaptic activity in their resting state, contributing to new learning and memory establishment. In contrast, when activated, they may lead to synaptic and cognitive dysfunction. Using a reliable acute AβO-mediated mouse model of AD, we explored whether the memory alteration AβOs induce relies on the activation of glial cells, and if Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), pivotal in the initiation of an immune response, is involved...
October 14, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Jonathan D Teo, Margaret J Morris, Nicole M Jones
OBJECTIVE: In humans, maternal obesity is associated with an increase in the incidence of birth related difficulties. However, the impact of maternal obesity on the severity of brain injury in offspring is not known. Recent studies have found evidence of increased glial response and inflammatory mediators in the brains as a result of obesity in humans and rodents. We hypothesised that hypoxic-ischaemic (HI) brain injury is greater in neonatal offspring from obese rat mothers compared to lean controls...
October 13, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
V A Macht, M Vazquez, C E Petyak, C A Grillo, K Kaigler, R T Enos, J L McClellan, T L Cranford, E A Murphy, J F Nyland, G Solomon, A Gertler, M A Wilson, L P Reagan
There is a growing appreciation that the complications of obesity extend to the central nervous system (CNS) and include increased risk for development of neuropsychiatric co-morbidities such as depressive illness. The neurological consequences of obesity may develop as a continuum and involve a progression of pathological features which is initiated by leptin resistance. Leptin resistance is a hallmark feature of obesity, but it is unknown whether leptin resistance or blockage of leptin action is casually linked to the neurological changes which underlie depressive-like phenotypes...
October 12, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Xabier Urra, Carlos Laredo, Yashu Zhao, Sergio Amaro, Salvatore Rudilosso, Arturo Renú, Alberto Prats-Galino, Anna M Planas, Laura Oleaga, Ángel Chamorro
BACKGROUND: Infections represent the most frequent medical complications in stroke patients. Their main determinants are dysphagia and a transient state of immunodepression. We analyzed whether distinct anatomical brain regions were associated with the occurrence of stroke-associated infections or immunodepression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 106 patients with acute ischemic stroke, we evaluated the incidence of pneumonia, urinary tract infection, or other infections together with the characterization of biomarkers of immunodepression...
October 11, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Graham Mazereeuw, Nathan Herrmann, Ana C Andreazza, Gustavo Scola, David W L Ma, Paul I Oh, Krista L Lanctôt
BACKGROUND: Antidepressant efficacy of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) treatment in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients remains unpredictable. N-3 PUFA can mitigate oxidative stress, which is common in CAD and may contribute to depressive symptoms. This study investigated whether greater pre-treatment oxidative stress, measured by the ratios of late-stage lipid peroxidation markers (malondialdehyde [MDA], 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [4-HNE], and 8-isoprostane [8-ISO]) to an early-stage marker (lipid hydroperoxides [LPH]), predicted n-3 PUFA antidepressant benefits in CAD...
October 11, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Siyang Yan, Amanda C Kentner
Exposure to painful procedures and/or stressors during the early neonatal period can reprogram the underlying neurocircuitry involved in nociception and neuropathic pain perception. The reprogramming of these systems can result in an enduring elevation in sensitivity towards mechanical and thermal stimuli. Recent evidence suggests that exposure to mild inflammatory mediators during the neonatal period can induce similar pain responses in both adolescent and adult rats. Therefore, we sought to profile changes in the expression of several genes across brain areas involved in the active modulation of nociception and neuropathic pain using a well-recognized model of neonatal inflammation...
October 11, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Zhenpeng Song, Bingrui Xiong, Hua Zheng, Anne Manyande, Xuehai Guan, Fei Cao, Lifang Ren, Yaqun Zhou, Dawei Ye, Yuke Tian
Major histocompatibility class II (MHC II)-specific activation of CD4(+) T helper cells generates specific and persistent adaptive immunity against tumors. Emerging evidence demonstrates that MHC II is also involved in basic pain perception; however, little is known regarding its role in the development of cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP). In this study, we demonstrate that MHC II expression was markedly induced on the spinal microglia of CIBP rats in response to STAT1 phosphorylation. Mechanical allodynia was ameliorated by either pharmacological or genetic inhibition of MHC II upregulation, which was also attenuated by the inhibition of pSTAT1 and pERK but was deteriorated by intrathecal injection of IFNγ...
October 11, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
David M Klyne, Mary F Barbe, Paul W Hodges
Systemic inflammation is linked with development and persistence of many pathological pain states. Although chronic phase inflammatory responses are well reported, the acute phase has received limited attention. Here we investigated circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP), and explored their relationships with symptom severity and other factors in acute low back pain (LBP). Ninety-nine individuals within two weeks of onset of acute LBP and 55 pain-free controls completed questionnaires related to their pain (visual analogue scale, VAS) and disability, behaviour, sleep quality and psychological status...
October 6, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Rebecca G Reed, Richard N Greenberg, Suzanne C Segerstrom
Cytomegalovirus (CMV) has been implicated as a factor in immunosenescence, including poor antibody response to vaccination and higher immune activation and inflammation. Some people may be more or less vulnerable to the negative effects of CMV. The present investigation tested the effects of beta-blocker use and chronological age on the associations between CMV and immunity in adults aged 60-91 (N=98; 69% CMV seropositive) who were administered the trivalent influenza vaccine for up to 5years. Peak antibody response, corrected for baseline, and spring (persistent) antibody response, corrected for peak, were assessed, as well as beta-2 microglobulin (β2μ) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)...
October 5, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Keqiang Chen, Ruoxi Yuan, Shuo Geng, Yao Zhang, Taojing Ran, Elizabeth Kowalski, Jingze Liu, Liwu Li
The excessive accumulation of specific cellular proteins or autophagic vacuoles (AVs) within neurons is a pathologic hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases. Constitutive autophagy in neurons prevents abnormal intracellular protein aggregation and is critical for maintaining cell survival. Since our previous study showed that Toll-interacting protein (Tollip)-deficient macrophages had constitutive disruption of endosome-lysosome fusion, we hypothesize that Tollip deficiency may also promote neuron death via blockage of autophagy completion...
October 5, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Lin Kooi Ong, Zidan Zhao, Murielle Kluge, Clifford TeBay, Katarzyna Zalewska, Phillip W Dickson, Sarah J Johnson, Michael Nilsson, Frederick R Walker
Exposure to psychological stress is known to seriously disrupt the operation of the substantia nigra (SN) and may in fact initiate the loss of dopaminergic neurons within the SN. In this study, we aimed to investigate how chronic stress modified the SN in adult male mice. Using a paradigm of repeated restraint stress (an average of 20 h per week for 6 weeks), we examined changes within the SN using a combination of western blotting and immunohistochemistry approaches. We demonstrated that chronic stress was associated with a clear loss of dopaminergic neurons within the SN...
October 4, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Nidhal Soualeh, Imen Dridi, Gauthier Eppe, Christophe Némos, Rachid Soulimani, Jaouad Bouayed
Several lines of evidence indicate that early-life inflammation may predispose to mental illness, including depression, in later-life. We investigated the impact of perinatal exposure to polluted eels on neonatal, postnatal, and adult brain inflammation, and on the resignation behavior of male and female adult offspring mice. The effects of maternal standard diet (laboratory food) were compared to the same diet enriched with low, intermediate, or highly polluted eels. Brain inflammatory markers including cytokines were assessed in offspring mice on the day of birth (i...
October 1, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
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