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Free Radical Biology & Medicine

Aaron Wilson, Vasily A Yakovlev
Cancer development and progression have been linked to oxidative stress, a condition characterized by unbalanced increase in ROS and RNS production. The main endogenous initiators of the redox imbalance in cancer cells are defective mitochondria, elevated NOX activity, and uncoupled NOS3. Traditionally, most attention has been paid to direct oxidative damage to DNA by certain ROS. However, increase in oxidative DNA lesions does not always lead to malignancy. Hence, additional ROS-dependent, pro-carcinogenic mechanisms must be important...
October 19, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
A R Fetoni, R Rolesi, F Paciello, S L M Eramo, C Grassi, D Troiani, G Paludetti
Experimental and human investigations have raised the level of concern about the potential ototoxicity of organic solvents and their interaction with noise. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effects of the combined noise and styrene exposure on hearing focusing on the mechanism of damage on the sensorineural cells and supporting cells of the organ of Corti and neurons of the ganglion of Corti. The impact of single and combined exposures on hearing was evaluated by auditory functional testing and histological analyses of cochlear specimens...
October 18, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Lucas C Pinheiro, Graziele C Ferreira, Jefferson H Amaral, Rafael L Portella, Sandra de O C Tella, Madla A Passos, Jose E Tanus-Santos
The nitric oxide (NO(•)) metabolites nitrite and nitrate exert antihypertensive effects by mechanisms that involve gastric formation of S-nitrosothiols. However, while the use of antiseptic mouthwash (AM) is known to attenuate the responses to nitrate by disrupting its enterosalivary cycle, there is little information about whether AM attenuates the effects of orally administered nitrite. We hypothesized that the antihypertensive effects of orally administered nitrite would not be prevented by AM because, in contrast to oral nitrate, oral nitrite could promote S-nitrosothiols formation in the stomach without intereference by AM...
October 18, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Pedro H F Gois, Daniele Canale, Rildo A Volpini, Daniela Ferreira, Mariana M Veras, Vinicius Andrade-Oliveira, Niels O S Câmara, Maria H M Shimizu, Antonio C Seguro
BACKGROUND: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the most severe complication of rhabdomyolysis. Allopurinol (Allo), a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, has been in the spotlight in the last decade due to new therapeutic applications related to its potent antioxidant effect. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Allo in the prevention and treatment of rhabdomyolysis-associated AKI. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups: saline control group; prophylactic Allo (300mg/L of drinking water, 7 days); glycerol (50%, 5ml/kg, IM); prophylactic Allo + glycerol; and therapeutic Allo (50mg/Kg, IV, 30minutes after glycerol injection) + glycerol...
October 18, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Aníbal M Reyes, Diego S Vazquez, Ari Zeida, Martín Hugo, M Dolores Piñeyro, María Inés De Armas, Darío Estrin, Rafael Radi, Javier Santos, Madia Trujillo
Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is the intracellular bacterium responsible for tuberculosis disease (TD). Inside the phagosomes of activated macrophages, M. tuberculosis is exposed to cytotoxic hydroperoxides such as hydrogen peroxide, fatty acid hydroperoxides and peroxynitrite. Thus, the characterization of the bacterial antioxidant systems could facilitate novel drug developments. In this work, we characterized the product of the gene Rv1608c from M. tuberculosis, which according to sequence homology had been annotated as a putative peroxiredoxin of the peroxiredoxin Q subfamily (PrxQ B from M...
October 14, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Carrie J Finno, Matthew H Bordbari, Stephanie J Valberg, David Lee, Josi Herron, Kelly Hines, Tamer Monsour, Erica Scott, Danika L Bannasch, James Mickelson, Libin Xu
Specific spontaneous heritable neurodegenerative diseases have been associated with lower serum and cerebrospinal fluid α-tocopherol (α-TOH) concentrations. Equine neuroaxonal dystrophy (eNAD) has similar histologic lesions to human ataxia with vitamin E deficiency caused by mutations in the α-TOH transfer protein gene (TTPA). Mutations in TTPA are not present with eNAD and the molecular basis remains unknown. Given the neuropathologic phenotypic similarity of the conditions, we assessed the molecular basis of eNAD by global transcriptome sequencing of the cervical spinal cord...
October 14, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Jasjeet Bhullar, Veena M Bhopale, Ming Yang, Kinjal Sethuraman, Stephen R Thom
This investigation explored the mechanism for microparticles (MPs) production by human and murine platelets exposed to high pressures of inert gases. Results demonstrate that MPs production occurs via an oxidative stress response in a dose-dependent manner and follows the potency series N2 > Ar > He. Gases with higher van der Waals volumes or polarizability such as SF6 and N2O, or hydrostatic pressure, do not cause MPs production. Singlet O2 is generated by N2, Ar and He, which is linked to NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity...
October 14, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Yuan Ma, Jia-Xiang Zhang, Ya-Nan Liu, Ai Ge, Hao Gu, Wang-Jian Zha, Xiao-Ning Zeng, Mao Huang
In the pathophysiology of asthma, structural cell dysfunction and concomitant microenvironment changes in airways are crucial to pathological progression, which involves oxidative stress. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active anti-oxidative component obtained from propolis, and has been shown to have beneficial effects on several respiratory disorders, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. However, the impact of CAPE on asthma is not well understood. Therefore, this study investigated the advantages of using CAPE to treat asthma and demonstrated the roles of CAPE in the regulation of airway microenvironments...
October 13, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Kelei Dong, Meiling Wu, Xiaomin Liu, Yanjie Huang, Dongyang Zhang, Yiting Wang, Liang-Jun Yan, Dongyun Shi
AMPK dysregulation contributes to the onset and development of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). AMPK is known to be activated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant interference. However the mechanism by which redox state mediates such contradictory result remains largely unknown. Here we used streptozotocin-high fat diet (STZ-HFD) induced-type 2 diabetic rats and cells lines (L02 and HEK 293) to explore the mechanism of redox-mediated AMPK activation. We show glutaredoxins (Grxs) concomitant with optimal ROS act as an essential mediator for AMPK activation...
October 12, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Ali Altıntaş, Kristian Davidsen, Christian Garde, Uffe H Mortensen, J Christian Brasen, Thomas Sams, Christopher T Workman
Although the role of oxidative stress factors and their regulation is well studied, the temporal dynamics of stress recovery is still poorly understood. In particular, measuring the kinetics of stress recovery in the first minutes after acute exposure provides a powerful technique for assessing the role of regulatory proteins or enzymes through the use of mutant backgrounds. This project endeavors to screen the temporal dynamics of intracellular oxidant levels in live cells as a function of gene deletion in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae...
October 11, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Benjamin Stottmeier, Tobias P Dick
The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) mediates expression of key genes involved in innate immunity and inflammation. NF-κB activation has been repeatedly reported to be modulated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here, we show that the NF-κB-activating signaling adapter myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) is highly sensitive to oxidation by H2O2 and may be redox-regulated in its function, thus facilitating an influence of H2O2 on the NF-κB signaling pathway. Upon oxidation, MyD88 forms distinct disulfide-linked conjugates which are reduced by the MyD88-interacting oxidoreductase nucleoredoxin (Nrx)...
October 5, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Katrin Gutsche, Elisa Randi, Volker Blank, Daniel Fink, Roland H Wenger, Cornelia Leo, Carsten C Scholz
Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive form of breast cancer. Treatment options are limited and the mechanisms underlying its aggressiveness are poorly understood. Intermittent hypoxia (IH) causes oxidative stress and is emerging as important regulator of tumor metastasis. Vessels in IBC tumors have been shown to be immature, which is a primary cause of IH. We therefore investigated the relevance of IH for the modulation of gene expression in IBC cells in order to assess IH as potential regulator of IBC aggressiveness...
October 5, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Dushani L Palliyaguru, Dionysios V Chartoumpekis, Nobunao Wakabayashi, John J Skoko, Yoko Yagishita, Shivendra V Singh, Thomas W Kensler
Small molecules of plant origin offer presumptively safe opportunities to prevent carcinogenesis, mutagenesis and other forms of toxicity in humans. However, the mechanisms of action of such plant-based agents remain largely unknown. In recent years the stress responsive transcription factor Nrf2 has been validated as a target for disease chemoprevention. Withania somnifera (WS) is a herb used in Ayurveda (an ancient form of medicine in South Asia). In the recent past, withanolides isolated from WS, such as Withaferin A (WA) have been demonstrated to be preventive and therapeutic against multiple diseases in experimental models...
October 4, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Praveen Mannam, Navin Rauniyar, TuKiet T Lam, Ruiyan Luo, Patty J Lee, Anup Srivastava
Cigarette smoking is the primary risk factor for COPD which is characterized by excessive inflammation and airflow obstruction of the lung. While inflammation is causally related to initiation and progression of COPD, the mitochondrial mechanisms that underlie the associated inflammatory responses are poorly understood. In this context, we have studied the role played by Mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase 3 (MKK3), a dual-specificity protein kinase, in cigarette smoke induced-inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction...
October 4, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Pandian Nagakannan, Mohamed Ariff Iqbal, Albert Yeung, James A Thliveris, Mojgan Rastegar, Saeid Ghavami, Eftekhar Eftekharpour
Oxidative damage and aggregation of cellular proteins is a hallmark of neuronal cell death after neurotrauma and chronic neurodegenerative conditions. Autophagy and ubiquitin protease system are involved in degradation of protein aggregates, and interruption of their function is linked to apoptotic cell death in these diseases. Oxidative modification of cysteine groups in key molecular proteins has been linked to modification of cellular systems and cell death in these conditions. Glutathione and thioredoxin systems provide reducing protons that can effectively reverse protein modifications and promote cell survival...
September 28, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Haiying Zhou, Ying Yan, Xueping Ee, Daniel A Hunter, Walter J Akers, Matthew D Wood, Mikhail Y Berezin
Peripheral nerve injury evokes a complex cascade of chemical reactions including generation of molecular radicals. Conversely, the reactions within nerve induced by stress are difficult to directly detect or measure to establish causality. Monitoring these reactions in vivo would enable deeper understanding of the nature of the injury and healing processes. Here, we utilized near-infrared fluorescence molecular probes delivered via intra-neural injection technique to enable live, in vivo imaging of tissue response associated with nerve injury and stress...
September 28, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Carlene Chun, Leon Zheng, Sean P Colgan
In recent years, studies in the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa have taught us a number of important lessons related to tissue oxygenation and metabolism in health and disease. The highly vascularized mucosa lies immediately adjacent to an anaerobic lumen containing trillions of metabolically active microbes (i.e. the microbiome) that results in one of the more austere tissue microenvironments in the body. These studies have also implicated a prominent role for oxygen metabolism and hypoxia in inflammation, so called "inflammatory hypoxia", that results from the activation of multiple oxygen consuming enzymes...
September 28, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Enika Nagababu
S-nitrosothiols (SNO) perform many important functions in biological systems, but the mechanism by which they are generated in vivo remains a contentious issue. Nitric oxide (NO) reacts with thiols to form SNO only in the presence of a molecule that will accept an electron from either NO or the thiol. In this study, we present evidence that ferriheme accepts an electron from NO or glutathione (GSH) to generate S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) in vitro under anaerobic or hypoxic (2% O2) conditions. Ferriheme formed charge transfer-stable complexes with NO to form ferriheme-NO (heme-Fe(II)-NO(+)) and with GSH to form ferriheme-GS (heme-Fe(II)-GS(•)) under anaerobic conditions...
September 27, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Jose J G Marin, Elisa Lozano, Maria J Perez
Alterations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and autophagy activation are common events in tumors. Here we have investigated the effect of mitochondrial genome depletion on chemical hypoxia-induced autophagy in liver tumor cells. Human SK-Hep-1 wild-type and mtDNA-depleted (Rho) cells were exposed to the hypoxia mimetic agents CoCl2 and deferoxamine (DFO). Up-regulation of HIF-1α, but not HIF-2α was observed. The expression of several HIF-1α target genes was also found. In human SK-Hep-1 and mouse Hepa 1-6 liver tumor cells, but not in the counterpart Rho derived lines, chemical hypoxia increased the abundance of autophagosomes and autolysosomes...
September 26, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Alain P Gobert, Keith T Wilson
Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that specifically colonizes the gastric ecological niche. During the infectious process, which results in diseases ranging from chronic gastritis to gastric cancer, the host response is characterized by the activation of the innate immunity of gastric epithelial cells and macrophages. These cells thus produce effector molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) to counteract the infection. The generation of ROS in response to H. pylori involves two canonical pathways: 1) the NADPH-dependent reduction of molecular oxygen to generate O2(•-), which can dismute to generate ROS; and 2) the back-conversion of the polyamine spermine into spermidine through the enzyme spermine oxidase, leading to H2O2 production...
September 25, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
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