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Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30624190/emphysematous-cystitis
#1
Waiel Abusnina, Mena Shehata, Sammy Nassri, Fuad Zeid
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30624189/acute-onset-quadriplegia-with-hyperreflexia
#2
Nasreen Shaikh, Muhammad Sardar, Wahab Khan, Wael Ghali
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30624188/progress-in-diagnosing-and-managing-cardiac-amyloidosis
#3
REVIEW
Mazen Hanna, Chetan Huded, E Rene Rodriguez, Dermot Phelan, Deborah Kwon, Wael Jaber, Jason Valent, Michael Zhen-Yu Tong
The last decade has seen major advances in diagnosing and treating cardiac amyloidosis. Early diagnosis can often now be made using noninvasive laboratory testing and imaging. New treatments are effective and well tolerated.
January 2019: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30624187/rapidly-progressive-pleural-effusion
#4
Zaid Zoumot, Ali S Wahla, Samar Farha
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30624186/who-needs-to-carry-an-epinephrine-autoinjector
#5
REVIEW
T Ted Song, Phil Lieberman
Patients who have had anaphylaxis or who are at risk of it (eg, due to food allergy or Hymenoptera hypersensitivity) should carry an epinephrine autoinjector at all times. However, the risks and benefits must be considered on an individual basis, especially in patients with atherosclerotic heart disease, elderly patients on polypharmacy, patients receiving allergen immunotherapy, those with large local reactions to insect stings, and individuals with oral allergy syndrome.
January 2019: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30624185/common-benign-breast-concerns-for-the-primary-care-physician
#6
REVIEW
Christine Lara Klassen, Stephanie L Hines, Karthik Ghosh
Women often visit their primary care physician because of breast concerns such as masses, pain, and nipple discharge. Most breast problems are benign, but it is important to know how to manage these and other breast problems and when to refer patients for further testing.
January 2019: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30624184/hypertension-guidelines-treat-patients-not-numbers
#7
REVIEW
Wesam Aleyadeh, Erika Hutt-Centeno, Haitham M Ahmed, Nishant P Shah
The updated 2017 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines for managing hypertension advocate tighter blood pressure control than previous guidelines. This review summarizes the evidence behind the guidelines, discusses the risks and benefits of stricter blood pressure control, and provides our insights on blood pressure management in clinical practice.
January 2019: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30624183/monoclonal-gammopathy-of-undetermined-significance-a-primary-care-guide
#8
REVIEW
Jack Khouri, Christy Samaras, Jason Valent, Alex Mejia Garcia, Beth Faiman, Saveta Mathur, Kimberly Hamilton, Megan Nakashima, Matt Kalaycio
Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is commonly diagnosed in outpatients being worked up for an array of clinical concerns. It carries a risk of progression to myeloma and other lymphoproliferative disorders that, albeit low (1% per year), warrants regular follow-up. Patients with MGUS can be risk-stratified on the basis of the amount and type of their monoclonal protein as well as whether they have an abnormal light-chain ratio. Here, we provide a guide to the diagnosis, workup, and management of MGUS...
January 2019: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30624182/should-metformin-be-used-in-every-patient-with-type-2-diabetes
#9
Vinni Makin, M Cecilia Lansang
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30624181/when-can-i-stop-dual-antiplatelet-therapy-in-patients-with-drug-eluting-stents
#10
Juan Simon Rico-Mesa, Carlos Uribe, Megha Prasad, Sushil Allen Luis
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30624180/mgus-it-s-about-the-protein-not-just-the-marrow
#11
EDITORIAL
Brian F Mandell
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30526762/correction-men-s-health-2018
#12
Alexander Chaitoff, T Colin Killeen, Craig Nielsen
In the article by Chaitoff et al (Men's health 2018: BPH, prostate cancer, erectile dysfunction, supplements. Cleve Clin J Med 2018; 85(11):871-880, doi:10.3949/ccjm.85a.18011), the prostate-specific antigen level of a 60-year-old man was given as 5.1 mg/dL. The unit of measure should have been 5.1 ng/mL. This has been corrected online.
December 2018: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30526761/to-the-editor-prostate-cancer-screening
#13
LETTER
David L Keller
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30526760/acute-necrotizing-esophagitis
#14
Takeshi Kondo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30526759/lung-complications-of-prescription-drug-abuse
#15
Josiah D McCain, Monia E Werlang, Andras Khoor, Isabel Mira-Avendano
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30526758/our-missing-microbes-short-term-antibiotic-courses-have-long-term-consequences
#16
Martin J Blaser
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30526757/narcolepsy-diagnosis-and-management
#17
REVIEW
Erin C Golden, Melissa C Lipford
Narcolepsy is a chronic disorder of hypersomnia that can have a significant impact on quality of life and livelihood. However, with appropriate treatment, its symptoms are manageable, and a satisfying personal, social, and professional life can still be enjoyed. Greater awareness of the disorder promotes accurate and efficient diagnosis. With ongoing research into its underlying biology, better treatments for narcolepsy will inevitably become available.
December 2018: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30526756/geriatrics-update-2018-challenges-in-mental-health-mobility-and-postdischarge-care
#18
REVIEW
Luke D Kim, Ardeshir Z Hashmi
A review of articles on geriatric topics from 2017 and 2018 revealed evidence supporting exercise for the elderly, early mobility for hospitalized patients, and oral anticoagulant therapy for atrial fibrillation to support cognitive function, and evidence against antipsychotic drugs for dementia-associated behaviors. No silver bullet was found for Alzheimer prevention or therapy.
December 2018: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30526755/cannabis-for-peripheral-neuropathy-the-good-the-bad-and-the-unknown
#19
REVIEW
Vania Modesto-Lowe, Rachel Bojka, Camille Alvarado
Cannabis may be an effective alternative or adjunctive treatment for peripheral neuropathy, an often debilitating condition for which standard treatments often provide little relief. Most studies show moderately improved pain from inhaled cannabis use, but adverse effects such as impaired cognition and respiratory problems are common, especially at high doses. Data on the long-term safety of cannabis treatments are limited. Until risk-benefit profiles are better characterized, doctors in states where cannabis therapy is legal should recommend it for peripheral neuropathy only after careful consideration...
December 2018: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30526754/beta-cell-therapies-for-type-1-diabetes-transplants-and-bionics
#20
REVIEW
Kathryn Bux Rodeman, Betul Hatipoglu
Research continues toward the goal of treating type 1 diabetes by replacing insulin-producing beta cells. Ideally, such treatment would be safe and long-lasting and would eliminate the need for subcutaneous insulin replacement. This article reviews the current state of beta-cell replacement through transplant of the whole pancreas or of islet cells. It also looks at the "bionic" pancreas and other future challenges.
December 2018: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
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