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Seminars in Interventional Radiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904255/renal-artery-embolization-for-renal-biopsy-bleed
#1
REVIEW
Paul J Rochon, Jia Hao Hu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904254/liver-infarction-after-drug-eluting-embolic-transarterial-chemoembolization-for-hepatocellular-carcinoma-in-the-setting-of-a-large-portosystemic-shunt
#2
REVIEW
Benjamin V Park, Ron C Gaba, R Peter Lokken
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904253/delayed-diagnosis-of-mirizzi-syndrome
#3
REVIEW
Olufunmilola Oladini, Steven M Zangan, Rakesh Navuluri
Biliary obstruction occurs in a wide variety of malignant and benign conditions. The following is a unique case of biliary obstruction caused by external compression of the hepatic duct by a gallstone (Mirizzi syndrome). Owing to unusual imaging characteristics of the stone, the mass was initially mistaken for a malignancy or hepatic pseudoaneurysm. It was not until the patient developed gallstone ileus that the correct diagnosis was made.
December 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904252/hemobilia
#4
REVIEW
Rakesh Navuluri
Hemobilia is a rare source of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, though the incidence is increasing along with the rise in minimally invasive biliary interventions. Prompt diagnosis and treatment rests on having appropriate clinical suspicion which should be based on the patient's presenting signs and symptoms, as well as history including recent instrumentation. Endoscopy should be reserved for cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with low suspicion for hemobilia. Interventional radiology may be the first-line diagnostic and therapeutic option for patients with a high suspicion of hemobilia...
December 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904251/pediatric-biliary-interventions-in-the-native-liver
#5
REVIEW
Lisa H Kang, Colin N Brown
Biliary disease in infants and children frequently presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Pediatric interventional radiologists are often involved in the multidisciplinary teams who care for these patients. This article reviews several notable causes of biliary disease in children who have not undergone liver transplantation, describes the role of percutaneous interventional procedures in managing these conditions, and details applicable biliary interventional techniques.
December 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904250/diagnosis-and-management-of-postoperative-biliary-leaks
#6
REVIEW
Arian M Nikpour, R Justin Knebel, Danny Cheng
Postoperative biliary leaks have become more common in the past three decades since the development of laparoscopic biliary surgery. The role of the radiologist and interventional radiologist is important in the diagnosis and treatment of such complications, and can play an adjunctive role in the definitive surgical repair. Ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, nuclear medicine cholescintigraphy studies, and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiograms (PTC) are the various imaging modalities used for diagnosis...
December 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904249/benign-biliary-strictures
#7
REVIEW
Ashley Altman, Steven M Zangan
Differentiating benign and malignant biliary strictures is a challenging and important clinical scenario. The typical presentation is indolent and involves elevation of liver enzymes, constitutional symptoms, and obstructive jaundice with or without superimposed or recurrent cholangitis. While overall the most common causes of biliary strictures are malignant, including cholangiocarcinoma and pancreatic adenocarcinoma, benign strictures encompass a wide spectrum of etiologies including iatrogenic, autoimmune, infectious, inflammatory, and congenital...
December 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904248/percutaneous-cholecystostomy-evidence-based-current-clinical-practice
#8
REVIEW
Karan Gulaya, Shamit S Desai, Kent Sato
The role of percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC) in the management of acute cholecystitis and cholangitis is outlined in the revised 2013 Tokyo Guidelines. These two emergencies constitute the vast majority of PC performed today for therapeutic purposes, and research has repeatedly shown the utility of PC in these conditions. PC is typically employed in the management of critically ill patients who are not surgical candidates. Indications and contraindications to PC are reviewed. Additional innovative applications of PC have been developed since it was first described in 1980...
December 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904247/biliary-interventions-tools-and-techniques-of-the-trade-access-cholangiography-biopsy-cholangioscopy-cholangioplasty-stenting-stone-extraction-and-brachytherapy
#9
REVIEW
Osman Ahmed, Sipan Mathevosian, Bulent Arslan
Therapeutic access to the biliary system is generally limited to endoscopic or percutaneous approaches. A variety of percutaneous transhepatic biliary interventions are applicable for the diagnosis and treatment of biliary system pathologies, the majority of which may be performed in conjunction with one another. The backbone of nearly all of these interventions is percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography for opacification of the biliary tree, after which any number of therapeutic or diagnostic modalities may be pursued...
December 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904246/noninvasive-imaging-of-the-biliary-system-relevant-to-percutaneous-interventions
#10
REVIEW
Stephen Thomas, Kayleen Jahangir
Clinical data such as history, physical examination, and laboratory tests are useful in identifying patients with biliary obstruction and biliary sources of infection. However, if intervention is planned, noninvasive imaging is needed to confirm the presence, location, and extent of the disease process. Currently, the most commonly available and used noninvasive modalities are ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), and nuclear medicine hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HIDA). US is quick, portable, readily available, and is commonly the first imaging modality used when biliary pathology is suspected...
December 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904245/choledocholithiasis-evaluation-treatment-and-outcomes
#11
REVIEW
Christopher Molvar, Bryan Glaenzer
Choledocholithiasis occurs in up to approximately 20% of patients with cholelithiasis. A majority of stones form in the gallbladder and then pass into the common bile duct, where they generate symptoms, due to biliary obstruction. Confirmatory diagnosis of choledocholithiasis is made with advanced imaging, including magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Treatment varies locally; however, ERCP with sphincterotomy is most commonly employed with a high degree of success...
December 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904244/management-of-malignant-biliary-obstruction
#12
REVIEW
Jonathan M Lorenz
The diagnosis of malignant biliary obstruction combines the use of clinical evaluation, diagnostic imaging, tissue sampling, and minimally invasive options with the initial goal of identifying candidates for curative resection. The most common causes of obstruction are pancreatic adenocarcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma, and most cases are too advanced for surgical options. Interventional radiologists and gastroenterologists offer palliative options for biliary drainage such as plastic stents and catheters, bare metal stents, and covered stents...
December 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904243/a-systematic-approach-to-patients-with-jaundice
#13
REVIEW
Bilal Gondal, Andrew Aronsohn
Jaundice is a clinical manifestation of disorders of underlying bilirubin metabolism, hepatocellular dysfunction, or biliary obstruction. As clinical presentations of yellowing of eyes or skin can be somewhat nonspecific for the underlying etiology of disease, a stepwise approach to evaluation is necessary for accurate diagnosis and effective treatment plan. In this review, we discuss underlying mechanisms of cholestasis and jaundice as well as laboratory and imaging modalities needed to evaluate a patient presenting with hyperbilirubinemia...
December 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904242/humanism-and-interventional-radiology
#14
EDITORIAL
Charles E Ray
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27582614/benign-prostatic-hyperplasia-review-of-modern-minimally-invasive-surgical-treatments
#15
REVIEW
Tony Nimeh, Brenden Magnan, Y Zaki Almallah
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27582613/image-guided-treatment-of-varicoceles-a-brief-literature-review-and-technical-note
#16
REVIEW
Reza Talaie, Shamar J Young, Prashant Shrestha, Siobhan M Flanagan, Michael S Rosenberg, Jafar Golzarian
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27582612/tips-and-tricks-for-difficult-prostatic-artery-embolization
#17
REVIEW
Sandeep Bagla, Ari J Isaacson
Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) is a promising, new, safe, minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. However, it can be a one of the most technically difficult interventional radiology procedures because of the challenging anatomy involved. To help achieve technical success and limit complications, the authors present here a series of tips and tricks that have been proven useful from prior PAE experience.
September 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27582611/review-of-current-literature-for-prostatic-artery-embolization
#18
REVIEW
Hyeon Yu, Ari J Isaacson, Charles T Burke
Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) is an emerging, novel interventional technique in the management of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). BPH is a common clinical condition in middle-aged and elderly men resulting in LUTS, including nocturia, urinary frequency, urgency, decreased urinary flow rates, hesitancy, and incomplete bladder emptying. Traditionally, LUTSs have been managed by medical or surgical therapies. Since the initial incidental discovery that selective PAE performed for uncontrolled bleeding secondary to BPH resulted in improved LUTS, the technique has continually evolved with a growing body of evidence supporting its safety and efficacy...
September 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27582610/utility-of-pelvic-computed-tomography-angiography-prior-to-prostatic-artery-embolization
#19
REVIEW
Ari J Isaacson, Lauren M B Burke
Pelvic computed tomography angiography (CTA) prior to prostatic artery embolization is a beneficial tool for preprocedural planning to increase the likelihood of success during what can be a challenging procedure. Additionally, the same CTA images can be used for calculating the baseline prostate volume as well as for intraprocedural anatomic guidance, adding to the value of the scan. This article discusses the technique used for pelvic CTA and its role in preprocedural assessment of the pelvic vasculature prior to prostatic artery embolization...
September 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27582609/medical-and-surgical-treatment-modalities-for-lower-urinary-tract-symptoms-in-the-male-patient-secondary-to-benign-prostatic-hyperplasia-a-review
#20
REVIEW
Matthew Ryan Macey, Mathew C Raynor
Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) is one of the most common ailments affecting aging men. Symptoms typically associated with BPH include weak stream, hesitancy, urgency, frequency, and nocturia. More serious complications of BPH include urinary retention, gross hematuria, bladder calculi, recurrent urinary tract infection, obstructive uropathy, and renal failure. Evaluation of BPH includes a detailed history, objective assessment of urinary symptoms with validated questionnaires, and measurement of bladder function parameters, including uroflowmetry and postvoid residual...
September 2016: Seminars in Interventional Radiology
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