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Hand Clinics

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886845/optimizing-the-treatment-of-upper-extremity-injuries-in-athletes
#1
EDITORIAL
Kevin C Chung
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886844/hand-and-wrist-injuries-in-boxing-and-the-martial-arts
#2
REVIEW
Benjamin Todd Drury, Thomas P Lehman, Ghazi Rayan
Hand and wrist injuries in martial arts are typically a reflection of the combat nature of this discipline. In striking sports, the axial load mechanism of injury is common and causes fractures and dislocations; in grappling sports, sprain injuries and degenerative changes predominate. There is clear evidence to support that hand protection reduces the risk of hand injury. Traditional training in martial arts on proper technique and target selection in striking sports reduces the risk of hand injury, and is an important component of hand and wrist injury prevention...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886843/expediting-professional-athletes-return-to-competition
#3
REVIEW
Jeff M Coppage, Michelle G Carlson
Return-to-play (RTP) decisions often represent a challenge to physicians caring for athletes. The multifaceted and unique nature of each RTP decision makes standardization of the decision-making process impossible and demands of the physician thoughtful consideration of all competing interests and variables. Such difficult medical decisions are further complicated by unique ethical and legal considerations. Although no concrete RTP recommendations are available, the consensus of experienced team physicians and knowledge of the rules and regulations that apply to RTP are helpful guides to treating the various upper extremity injuries that occur in elite athletes...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886842/hand-and-wrist-injuries-in-golfers-and-their-treatment
#4
REVIEW
Sang-Hyun Woo, Young-Keun Lee, Jong-Min Kim, Ho-Jun Cheon, William H J Chung
A thorough understanding of the swing phases and mechanisms of injury in golf allows accurate diagnosis, treatment, and future prevention of injuries. Recommended initial treatment starts with cessation of practice to rest the wrist, a splint or orthotic brace, and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug medication with corticosteroid injection and swing modification. Pisiform excision is the best treatment of the most severe chronic cases of pisiform ligament complex syndrome. Delayed diagnosis of hook of hamate fracture may lead to complications, including flexor tendon rupture...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886841/management-of-upper-extremity-injury-in-divers
#5
REVIEW
Steven C Haase
Modern competitive diving-especially platform diving-applies dramatic stress to the upper extremity. Some stress occurs during handstand-style takeoffs, but more force is delivered to the hand, wrist, elbow, and shoulder during hands-first entry. Hand positions that minimize the amount of splash result in forceful wrist extension. This repetitive impact can lead to chronic upper extremity pain and acute injuries that require operative intervention. Many divers use taping and bracing to prevent or treat this type of injury, but these are only modestly effective...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886840/elbow-dislocations-in-contact-sports
#6
REVIEW
Mark S Morris, Kagan Ozer
Elbow dislocations are more common in athletes than in the general population. Simple elbow dislocations should be managed with early range of motion and early return to sport, even with high-level contact athletes. Patients with instability on examination or with complex elbow dislocations may require surgical intervention. Overall, the outcomes after simple elbow dislocations are excellent and athletes should be able to return to play without significant limitations.
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886839/medial-elbow-injuries-in-the-throwing-athlete
#7
REVIEW
Jimmy H Daruwalla, Charles A Daly, John G Seiler
Medial elbow injuries in the throwing athlete are common and increasing in frequency. They occur due to repetitive supraphysiologic forces acting on the elbow during the overhead throw. Overuse and inadequate rest are salient risk factors for injury. Most athletes improve substantially with rest and nonoperative treatment, although some athletes may require surgical intervention to return to play. Because of advances in conservative and surgical treatments, outcomes after medial elbow injury have improved over time...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886838/biceps-and-triceps-ruptures-in-athletes
#8
REVIEW
Jared R Thomas, Jeffrey Nathan Lawton
Although rare, biceps and triceps tendon ruptures constitute significant injuries that can lead to profound disability if left untreated, especially in the athletic population. Biceps rupture is more common than triceps rupture, with both resulting from a forceful eccentric load. Surgical repair is the treatment method of choice for tendinous ruptures in athletes. Nonoperative management is rarely indicated in this population and is typically reserved for individuals with partial ruptures that quickly regain strength and function...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886837/therapy-and-rehabilitation-for-upper-extremity-injuries-in-athletes
#9
REVIEW
Michael S Gart, Thomas A Wiedrich
The approach to rehabilitation of upper extremity injuries in athletes differs from traditional rehabilitation protocols. In general, athletes have higher functional demands and wish to return to competitive sport in a timely manner. Comprehensive rehabilitation must therefore be balanced with a timely and safe return to sport. Several rehabilitation programs and adjunctive therapies are available to hasten convalescence while minimizing the athlete's risks of reinjury. Here, we review techniques for soft tissue mobilization and strength training in athletic populations...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886836/ulnar-neuropathy-in-cyclists
#10
REVIEW
Jacob W Brubacher, Fraser J Leversedge
The form and function of the cyclist exposes the ulnar nerve to both traction and compressive forces at both the elbow and wrist. Prevention of ulnar neuropathy and treatment of early symptoms include bike fitting, avoidance of excessive or prolonged weight-bearing through the hands, and the use of padded gloves. For persisting or progressive symptoms, a thorough history and physical examination is essential to confirm the diagnosis and to rule out other sites of nerve compression. The majority of compression neuropathies in cyclists resolve after appropriate rest and conservative treatment; however, should symptoms persist, nerve decompression may be indicated...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886835/shoulder-injuries-in-the-overhead-throwing-athlete
#11
REVIEW
Ryan A Mlynarek, Simon Lee, Asheesh Bedi
The overhead pitching motion is a coordinated sequence of movements that subjects the shoulder to extreme forces. The ultimate goal of this complex, dynamic activity is to generate high ball velocity and accuracy. In doing so, repetitive throwing can cause adaptive and pathologic changes in the thrower's shoulder. This article reviews the relevant shoulder anatomy, the kinetic chain, and throwing mechanics, as well as common shoulder injuries and surgical options for the treating orthopedic surgeon.
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886834/upper-extremity-injuries-in-gymnasts
#12
REVIEW
Megan R Wolf, Daniel Avery, Jennifer Moriatis Wolf
Gymnastics is a unique sport, which loads the wrist and arms as weight-bearing extremities. Because of the load demands on the wrist in particular, stress fractures, physeal injury, and overuse syndromes may be observed. This spectrum of injury has been termed "gymnast's wrist," and incorporates such disorders as wrist capsulitis, ligamentous tears, triangular fibrocartilage complex tears, chondromalacia of the carpus, stress fractures, distal radius physeal arrest, and grip lock injury.
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886833/upper-extremity-injuries-in-tennis-players-diagnosis-treatment-and-management
#13
REVIEW
Kevin C Chung, Meghan E Lark
Upper extremity tennis injuries are most commonly characterized as overuse injuries to the wrist, elbow, and shoulder. The complex anatomy of these structures and their interaction with biomechanical properties of tennis strokes contributes to the diagnostic challenges. A thorough understanding of tennis kinetics, in combination with the current literature surrounding diagnostic and treatment methods, will improve clinical decision-making.
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886832/thumb-injuries-in-athletes
#14
REVIEW
Tiffany R Kadow, John R Fowler
Thumb injuries are common in athletes and present a challenging opportunity for upper extremity physicians. Common injuries include metacarpal base fractures (Bennett and Rolando types), ulnar and radial collateral ligament injuries, dislocation of the carpometacarpal and metacarpophalangeal joints, and phalanx fractures. This review, although not exhaustive, highlights some of the most common thumb injuries in athletes. The treating physician must balance pressure from athletes, parents, coaches, and executives to expedite return to play with the long-term well-being of the athlete...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886831/finger-injuries-in-football-and-rugby
#15
REVIEW
Kate E Elzinga, Kevin C Chung
Football and rugby athletes are at increased risk of finger injuries given the full-contact nature of these sports. Some players may return to play early with protective taping, splinting, and casting. Others require a longer rehabilitation period and prolonged time away from the field. The treating hand surgeon must weigh the benefits of early return to play for the current season and future playing career against the risks of reinjury and long-term morbidity, including post-traumatic arthritis and decreased range of motion and strength...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886830/flexor-tendon-pulley-injuries-in-rock-climbers
#16
REVIEW
Elizabeth A King, John R Lien
Closed pulley ruptures are rare in the general population but occur more frequently in rock climbers due to biomechanical demands on the hand. Injuries present with pain and swelling over the affected pulley, and patients may feel or hear a pop at the time of injury. Sequential pulley ruptures are required for clinical bowstringing of the flexor tendons. Ultrasound confirms diagnosis of pulley rupture and evaluates degree of displacement of the flexor tendons. Isolated pulley ruptures frequently are treated conservatively with early functional rehabilitation...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886829/finger-injuries-in-ball-sports
#17
REVIEW
David T Netscher, Dang T Pham, Kimberly Goldie Staines
Finger injuries are common in athletes playing in professional ball sports. Understanding the intricate anatomy of the digit is necessary to properly diagnose and manage finger injuries. Unrecognized or poorly managed finger injuries can lead to chronic deformities that can affect an athlete's performance. Multiple factors and treatment options should be considered to provide the best functional outcome and rapid return to play for an athlete. This article discusses the mechanism of injury, diagnosis, treatment, and return-to-play recommendations for common finger injuries in ball sports...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886828/wrist-arthroscopy-for-athletic-injuries
#18
REVIEW
Rick Tosti, Eon Shin
Management of hand and wrist injuries for athletes often places emphasis on an expeditious return to sport. Arthroscopic techniques have the advantage of directly visualizing joint derangements and correcting them via a minimally invasive approach. This article discusses the evaluation and management of common wrist injuries treated with arthroscopy in athletes, including scapholunate and lunotriquetral injury, triangular fibrocartilage complex tears, hamatolunate impingement, and arthroscopic-assisted reduction of wrist fractures...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886827/treating-the-football-athlete-coaches-perspective-from-the-university-of-michigan
#19
REVIEW
Kevin C Chung, Meghan E Lark, Paul S Cederna
Although football is one of the most popular sports in America, its high injury incidence places concern on the injury prevention and safety of its players. This article investigates the perspectives of two National Collegiate Athletic Association Division 1 football coaches on promoting injury management and player safety while maintaining a highly competitive team. Through obtaining their coaching philosophy team management topics, effective strategies that contribute to a team culture prioritizing player well-being were identified...
February 2017: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27712758/reconstructing-lives
#20
S Raja Sabapathy
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Hand Clinics
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