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Hand Clinics

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012304/errata
#1
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012303/dupuytren-disease
#2
EDITORIAL
Steven C Haase, Kevin C Chung
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012302/bringing-it-all-together-a-practical-approach-to-the-treatment-of-dupuytren-disease
#3
REVIEW
Steven C Haase, Kevin C Chung
As minimally invasive options for treatment of Dupuytren contractures become increasingly widespread, it is important that the evidence is carefully evaluated and patients are informed of the risks and benefits of the options available. The authors advocate a shared decision-making process, using evidence-based medicine, to guide patients in their treatment choices. In this article, the authors present their thoughtful approach to selecting the appropriate Dupuytren treatment of patients, along with detailed, practical technical tips to avoid complications during the execution of these interventions; both collagenase injection and limited fasciectomy techniques are described in detail...
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012301/advances-in-minimally-invasive-treatment-of-dupuytren-disease
#4
REVIEW
Steven E R Hovius, Chao Zhou
A comparison is provided between minimally invasive techniques and limited fasciectomy (LF) in the treatment of Dupuytren disease. A technique called percutaneous needle aponeurotomy and lipofilling is described. In a randomized controlled trial, there is no significant difference between this technique and LF after 1 year in contracture correction and recurrent contractures. At 5 years postoperative, however, there is a significant change in recurrence rates in favor of LF. Patients with moderate diathesis should choose between minimally invasive technique with early recurrence, fast recovery, and few complications versus late recurrence, slower recovery, and more complications, as observed with LF or dermofasciectomy...
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012300/treatment-of-recurrent-dupuytren-disease
#5
REVIEW
Frederick Thomas D Kaplan, Nicholas E Crosby
Treatment of recurrent Dupuytren disease is challenging. Multiple options exist, each having relative benefits and weaknesses. Choice for optimal treatment is made on a case-by-case basis, with shared decision making with the patient. Percutaneous and enzymatic techniques are best reserved for patients with well-defined recurrent disease and offer the benefit of quicker recovery with minimal or no scarring. Surgical treatments have higher risks of neurovascular injury and scarring, but lower recurrence rates...
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012299/the-role-of-hand-therapy-in-dupuytren-disease
#6
REVIEW
Christina Turesson
The role of hand therapy in the treatment of Dupuytren disease varies depending on the patient and the procedure. There is limited evidence for hand therapy as a preventive treatment of Dupuytren disease. Before corrective treatment, the hand therapist can contribute with assessments to promote evaluation of outcome. After corrective treatment, hand therapy is tailored to each patient's needs and consists of orthoses, exercise, edema control, and pain or scar management. Orthoses are usually part of the hand therapy protocol after corrective procedures despite lack of strong supporting evidence and should be provided based on individual patient needs...
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012298/complications-of-treatment-for-dupuytren-disease
#7
REVIEW
Kyle R Eberlin, Chaitanya S Mudgal
Dupuytren contracture is a progressive disease involving collagen within the palmar fascia. When the contracture progresses to meet specific parameters, intervention is considered and includes collagenase injection, percutaneous or open fasciotomy, or palmar fasciectomy. Complications after treatment include contracture recurrence, digital nerve injury or postoperative neurapraxia, flexor tendon injury/rupture, delayed wound healing or skin necrosis, dysvascular digit/arterial injury, hematoma, and infection...
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012297/comparative-outcomes-of-dupuytren-disease-treatment
#8
REVIEW
Paul Binhammer
Despite more than a hundred years of publications on Dupuytren disease, there has been a lack of consensus on definitions and outcomes until recently. Staging and classifications systems have an important historical context; however, more recently, outcomes rely on patient-reported outcomes, angular correction, and definitions of recurrence. This article reviews commonly used assessments, classifications, and staging systems for Dupuytren disease.
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012296/alternative-and-adjunctive-treatments-for-dupuytren-disease
#9
REVIEW
Paul M N Werker, Ilse Degreef
Clinicians struggle with limited efficacy and durability of standard treatments when treating patients with Dupuytren disease diathesis. Alternative treatments such as low-dose radiation therapy in early phase of disease, supplemental pharmacotherapy with anti-inflammatory and/or anti-mitotic drugs, as well as other pharmacologic targets, and more aggressive surgery such as dermofasciectomy all have been reported with variable success or with serious side effects that hamper their standard use. This article gives an overview of the available literature...
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012295/fasciectomy-for-dupuytren-contracture
#10
REVIEW
Joseph J Dias, Sheweidin Aziz
This article discusses limited fasciectomy for Dupuytren contracture, reviews the literature to list common complications, addresses the observations that need to be made after surgery, and systematically reviews the literature for 2 clinical questions: (1) regarding leaving wounds open and (2) the use of postoperative splintage.
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012294/development-of-collagenase-treatment-for-dupuytren-disease
#11
REVIEW
Marie A Badalamente, Lawrence C Hurst
Proof-of-principle, basic-science studies, using a rat-tail tendon model and surgically removed Dupuytren cords, began collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) development. Clinical studies in humans were then conducted, where the primary endpoint was reduction in contracture to within 0° to 5° of extension. Phase 2 studies, which confirmed the optimal dose of collagenase as 0.58 mg, showed injectable CCH reduced contractures in MP and PIP joints to within 0° to 5° in many joints and was well tolerated...
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012293/needle-aponeurotomy-for-dupuytren-disease
#12
REVIEW
Kate E Elzinga, Michael J Morhart
Needle aponeurotomy is an effective, minimally invasive treatment for metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joint contractures caused by Dupuytren disease. Multiple joints and digits can be safely treated in 1 session. Needle aponeurotomy is more cost-effective and has a significantly lower complication rate compared with open fasciectomy and collagenase injections. Recurrence rates are higher compared with open fasciectomy and collagenase injections. Patient satisfaction rates are high following needle aponeurotomy; the single clinic visit required and the minimal downtime after treatment are advantages unique to this procedure compared with other treatment modalities, including open fasciectomy, dermatofasciectomy, collagenase injections, and lipofilling...
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012292/normal-and-pathologic-anatomy-of-dupuytren-disease
#13
REVIEW
Stephen J Leibovic
Dupuytren disease causes nodules and thickened fascial cords in the hands of affected individuals. In this article, the author explains normal fascial anatomy of the hand and describes how it relates to the pathologic anatomy found in Dupuytren disease. Anatomic findings in diseased cords are described, with particular reference to dangers encountered in treatment of this condition.
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012291/risk-factors-disease-associations-and-dupuytren-diathesis
#14
REVIEW
Sandip Hindocha
Dupuytren disease (DD) is a benign, fibroproliferative disease of unknown cause. The disease predominantly affects the palms of the hands, causing permanent digital contracture of affected digits. DD is a late-onset disease and is often progressive, irreversible, and bilateral. The disease has a significant impact on the health care economy. The mainstay of treatment of DD is surgical excision of diseased palmar fascia. There is evidence of genetic susceptibility. This article introduces the epidemiology of DD and examines the Dupuytren diathesis to highlight the importance of identifying clinical severity in relation to patient counseling and recurrence risk following treatment...
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30012290/the-basic-science-of-dupuytren-disease
#15
REVIEW
Andrew Y Zhang, Jennifer S Kargel
Dupuytren disease is a fibroproliferative condition affecting the hands of millions of patients worldwide. The hypothesis of pathogenesis involves genetic factors and internal factors. Recent genome-wide association studies have provided much needed evidence for the long-held belief of a strong genetic component to the pathogenesis of Dupuytren disease. Specifically, abnormal activation of the Wnt signaling pathway plays an important role. Regarding internal factors, microvascular angiopathy and ischemia have been shown to lead to activation of transforming growth factor-β1 and proliferation of myofibroblasts...
August 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29625647/current-concepts-in-the-management-of-proximal-interphalangeal-joint-disorders
#16
EDITORIAL
Kevin C Chung
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29625646/therapy-concepts-for-the-proximal-interphalangeal-joint
#17
REVIEW
Nathan P Douglass, Amy L Ladd
The principles of hand therapy for proximal interphalangeal joint disorders include protecting injured structures, minimizing patient discomfort, and optimizing patient recovery. Comprehension of hand anatomy, the nature of the injury being treated, and the phases of healing are critical when designing a safe and effective hand therapy program. Hand therapists use a combination of orthoses, guided exercises, and modalities to improve edema, sensitivity, range of motion, and function.
May 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29625645/complications-of-proximal-interphalangeal-joint-injuries-prevention-and-treatment
#18
REVIEW
Sirichai Kamnerdnakta, Helen E Huetteman, Kevin C Chung
Proximal interphalangeal joint injuries are one of the most common injuries of the hand. The severity of injury can vary from a minor sprain to a complex intra-articular fracture. Because of the complex anatomy of the joint, complications may occur even after an appropriate treatment. This article provides a comprehensive review on existing techniques to manage complications and imparts practical points to help prevent further complications after proximal interphalangeal joint injury.
May 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29625644/management-of-flexor-pulley-injuries-with-proximal-interphalangeal-joint-contracture
#19
REVIEW
Elizabeth Inkellis, Emily Altman, Scott W Wolfe
Flexor pulley ruptures with severe proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint contracture present a complex challenge for the hand surgeon. Four patients were treated with a delayed presentation of pulley rupture and fixed PIP flexion contracture with a technique of external extension torque application followed by splinting without pulley reconstruction. Using this technique, the PIP joint contractures improved from an average of 66° to an average of 19°, patient satisfaction was high, and the pulley injuries were managed with splinting alone without open pulley reconstruction...
May 2018: Hand Clinics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29625643/treating-congenital-proximal-interphalangeal-joint-contracture
#20
REVIEW
Sarah M Yannascoli, Charles A Goldfarb
The management of congenital proximal interphalangeal joint deformity, also known as camptodactyly, is challenging. There are numerous theories on the cause of this abnormal finger posture, leading to variations in classification, definition, and treatment approaches. This article assesses the previous literature and provides clarity and guidance for the practical treatment of camptodactyly.
May 2018: Hand Clinics
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