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Canadian Journal of Cardiology

Michael Papadakis, Sanjay Sharma
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 27, 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Roxanne Pelletier, Jin Choi, Nicholas Winters, Mark J Eisenberg, Simon L Bacon, Jafna Cox, Stella S Daskalopoulou, Kim L Lavoie, Igor Karp, Avi Shimony, Derek So, George Thanassoulis, Louise Pilote
BACKGROUND: Over past decades, the incidence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has increased in young women, and greater mortality rates after discharge were observed among young women vs men. We revisited this issue with contemporary data from the Gender and Sex Determinants of Cardiovascular Disease: From Bench to Beyond Premature Acute Coronary Syndrome (GENESIS-PRAXY), a multicentre prospective cohort study. METHODS: One thousand two hundred thirteen patients were enrolled in GENESIS-PRAXY from 26 centres across Canada, the United States, and Switzerland between January 2009 and April 2013...
September 21, 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Tara L Sedlak, Mona Izadnegahdar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 21, 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
David W J Armstrong
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 17, 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Ata Ur Rehman Quraishi, Laurie J Lambert, Mina Madan, Yanyan Gong, Anne Forsey, Diane Galbraith, Neala Gill, Garth H Oakes, Andrea Lavoie, Ronald G Carere, Robert C Welsh
Currently there are more than 40 centres in Canada that perform more than 65,000 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) in a year. Considering the high volume of procedures and number of operators, the potential for variation in processes of care is high, and might lead to variation in the quality of care. As part of its quality initiative, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society convened a working group to develop a set of PCI Quality Indicators (QIs) that would be relevant, scientifically acceptable, and feasible to measure and report...
July 25, 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Todd J Anderson, Jean Grégoire, Glen J Pearson, Arden R Barry, Patrick Couture, Martin Dawes, Gordon A Francis, Jacques Genest, Steven Grover, Milan Gupta, Robert A Hegele, David C Lau, Lawrence A Leiter, Eva Lonn, G B John Mancini, Ruth McPherson, Daniel Ngui, Paul Poirier, John L Sievenpiper, James A Stone, George Thanassoulis, Richard Ward
Since the publication of the 2012 guidelines new literature has emerged to inform decision-making. The 2016 guidelines primary panel selected a number of clinically relevant questions and has produced updated recommendations, on the basis of important new findings. In subjects with clinical atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm, most subjects with diabetes or chronic kidney disease, and those with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥ 5 mmol/L, statin therapy is recommended. For all others, there is an emphasis on risk assessment linked to lipid determination to optimize decision-making...
July 25, 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Rajat Sharma, Colleen M Norris, Gabor Gyenes, Manohara Senaratne, Kevin R Bainey
BACKGROUND: Unequivocally, cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in patients with established cardiovascular disease improves survival. However, its effect on higher-risk ethnic groups has not been explored. Accordingly, we evaluated the effect of CR on South Asian (SA) compared with European Canadians with coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS: Using the Alberta Provincial Project for Outcome Assessment in Coronary Heart Disease (APPROACH) registry, 26,167 patients from Edmonton, Alberta who received coronary angiography with documented CAD were reviewed (January 2002 to March 2012)...
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Richard B Thompson, Corey R Tomczak, Mark J Haykowsky
Impaired exercise tolerance is a major determinant of decreased quality of life and survival in individuals with cardiovascular disease. The relative contribution that abnormal cardiac, vascular, and skeletal muscle function plays in limiting exercise tolerance and its improvement with exercise training in patients with cardiovascular disease is not fully known. In this review, we provide an overview of the functional impairment of these systems as they relate to exercise capacity and the emerging role of magnetic resonance imaging as a comprehensive tool to evaluate mechanisms that may explain exercise intolerance...
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Mark J Haykowsky, Kathryn M Daniel, Paul S Bhella, Satyam Sarma, Dalane W Kitzman
The primary chronic symptom in patients with clinically stable heart failure (HF) is reduced exercise tolerance, measured as decreased peak aerobic power (peak oxygen consumption [Vo2]), and is associated with reduced quality of life and survival. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (EBCR) is a safe and effective intervention to improve peak Vo2, muscle strength, physical functional performance, and quality of life and is associated with a reduction in overall and HF-specific hospitalization in clinically stable patients with HF...
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Sandeep Aggarwal, Randy D Moore, Ross Arena, Brenda Marra, Amanda McBride, Brea Lamb, Billie-Jean Martin, James Stone
Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is the result of atherosclerosis in the lower limb arteries, which can give rise to intermittent claudication (IC), limb ulceration, infections, and, in some circumstances, amputation. As a result of PAD, patients are frequently limited in both walking duration and speed. These ambulatory deficits impact both functional capacity and quality of life. The prevalence of PAD is increasing, and patients with this diagnosis have high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A comprehensive approach is required to improve outcomes in patients with PAD and include tobacco cessation, pharmacologic management of metabolic fitness, risk-factor modification, and exercise training...
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Carl J Lavie, Arthur R Menezes, Alban De Schutter, Richard V Milani, James A Blumenthal
The role of psychological risk factors has been under-recognized in most subspecialties of medicine, as well as in general medicine practices. However, considerable evidence indicates that psychosocial factors are involved in the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Emerging data from cardiac rehabilitation (CR) settings and CR exercise training (CRET) programs have demonstrated the value of comprehensive CRET to improve psychological functioning and reduce all-cause mortality. Recent evidence also supports the role of CRET and the added value of stress management training in the secondary prevention of CVD...
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Sherry L Grace, Karam Turk-Adawi, Carolina Santiago de Araújo Pio, David A Alter
Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a proven model of secondary prevention. Indicated cardiac conditions for CR are well established, and participation of these patients results in significantly lower mortality and morbidity when compared with usual care. There are approximately 170 CR programs in Canada, which varies widely by province. There is a grossly insufficient capacity to treat all patients with cardiac indications in Canada and beyond. The density of CR services is about half that in the United States, at 1 program per 208,823 inhabitants or 1 program per 7779 patients with cardiac disease...
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Robert E Heinl, Devinder S Dhindsa, Elliot N Mahlof, William M Schultz, Johnathan C Ricketts, Tina Varghese, Amirhossein Esmaeeli, Marc P Allard-Ratick, Anthony J Millard, Heval M Kelli, Pratik B Sandesara, Danny J Eapen, Laurence Sperling
The epidemic of obesity has contributed to a growing burden of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and diabetes mellitus (DM) worldwide. MetS is defined as central obesity along with associated factors such as hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hyperglycemia, and hypertension. MetS and DM are associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Healthy behavioural modification is the cornerstone for reducing the atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease burden in this population...
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Paolo Raggi, James A Stone
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Laurent Macle, John Cairns, Kori Leblanc, Teresa Tsang, Allan Skanes, Jafna L Cox, Jeff S Healey, Alan Bell, Louise Pilote, Jason G Andrade, L Brent Mitchell, Clare Atzema, David Gladstone, Mike Sharma, Subodh Verma, Stuart Connolly, Paul Dorian, Ratika Parkash, Mario Talajic, Stanley Nattel, Atul Verma
The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Guidelines Committee provides periodic reviews of new data to produce focused updates that address clinically important advances in AF management. This 2016 Focused Update deals with: (1) the management of antithrombotic therapy for AF patients in the context of the various clinical presentations of coronary artery disease; (2) real-life data with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (3) the use of antidotes for the reversal of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (4) digoxin as a rate control agent; (5) perioperative anticoagulation management; and (6) AF surgical therapy including the prevention and treatment of AF after cardiac surgery...
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Nicola Vistarini, Mustapha Belaidi, Georges Desjardins, Michel Pellerin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Negar Salehi, Mojdeh Nasiri, Nicole R Bianco, Madalina Opreanu, Vini Singh, Vaibhav Satija, Aravdeep S Jhand, Lilit Karapetyan, Abdul Rahman Safadi, Phani Surapaneni, Ranjan K Thakur
BACKGROUND: The wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) is often used in patients at risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) who are not yet candidates for an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Newly diagnosed cardiomyopathy may be reversible, and a WCD may protect patients during the initial period of risk. We evaluate the benefit and compliance of the WCD in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM). METHODS: We reviewed a national database of patients with NICM who used WCDs and who self-reported a history of excess alcohol use, although other causes of cardiomyopathy could not be excluded...
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
George G S Sandor
In this article the utility of echocardiographic tests of left ventricular (LV) function in pediatric cardiology is reviewed. These indices are derived from the basic concepts of cardiac physiology, namely the Frank-Starling curve, pressure volume loops, and the force frequency relation and, to some extent, are all governed by these general principles. Thus, they are prone to be load-dependent and their utility variable. Methods that use formulas for calculating LV volume are a problem in congenital heart disease in which LV geometry is frequently abnormal...
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
David L Narotsky, Adam Castano, Jonathan W Weinsaft, Sabahat Bokhari, Mathew S Maurer
Amyloidosis is caused by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein fibrils, resulting in destruction of tissue architecture and impairment of organ function. The most common forms of systemic amyloidosis are light-chain and transthyretin-related (ATTR). ATTR can result from an autosomal dominant hereditary transmission of mutated genes in the transthyretin or from a wild-type form of disease (ATTRwt), previously known as senile cardiac amyloidosis. With the aging of the worldwide population, ATTRwt will emerge as the most common type of cardiac amyloidosis that clinicians encounter...
September 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Deborah E Meyers, Sarah J Goodlin
Advanced heart failure (HF) therapies are focused on extending life and improving function. In contrast, palliative care is a holistic approach that focuses on symptom alleviation and patients' physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs. HF clinicians can integrate palliative care strategies by incorporating several important components of planning and decision-making for HF patients. Future care planning (FCP) for HF patients should incorporate the basic tenets of shared decision-making (SDM). These include understanding the patient's perspective and care preferences, articulating what is medically feasible, and integrating these considerations into the overall care plan...
September 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
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