journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Seminars in Oncology Nursing

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29678481/clinical-decision-support-tools-improving-cancer-care
#1
REVIEW
Robert C Stillman
OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical decision support tools and advancements in health information technology currently utilized at a National Cancer Institute designated cancer center to aid in achieving the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Triple Aim project. DATA SOURCES: Published literature, Web sites. CONCLUSION: Advances in health information technology facilitate increasing quality and satisfaction with care, improving the health of populations, and reducing the cost of care...
April 17, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29631935/tumor-treating-fields-technology-alternating-electric-field-therapy-for-the-treatment-of-solid-tumors
#2
REVIEW
Laura Benson
OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) and the Optune device in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme as well as discuss the evolution of TTFields technology for the treatment of different tumor types. DATA SOURCES: Peer reviewed publications, proceedings, and Internet-based resources. CONCLUSION: TTFields represent a unique technological modality for the effective treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and potentially other solid tumors...
April 6, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29628200/public-policy-and-health-informatics
#3
REVIEW
Katherine Bell
OBJECTIVES: To provide an overview of the history of electronic health policy and identify significant laws that influence health informatics. DATA SOURCES: US Department of Health and Human Services. CONCLUSION: The development of health information technology has influenced the process for delivering health care. Public policy and regulations are an important part of health informatics and establish the structure of electronic health systems...
April 5, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29627143/telehealth-mobile-applications-and-wearable-devices-are-expanding-cancer-care-beyond-walls
#4
REVIEW
Carol Cannon
OBJECTIVES: To review telehealth solutions, mobile applications, and wearable devices that are currently impacting patients, caregivers, and providers who work in the oncology setting. DATA SOURCES: A literature search was conducted using the terms (Telehealth, Mobile Health, mHealth, Wearable Devices) + (Oncology, Cancer Care). CONCLUSION: There are many current applications of telehealth and mobile health in the oncology setting. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Nurses who care for patients with cancer should be aware of the pervasiveness and impact of telehealth and mobile health to this unique population...
April 4, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29625803/using-patient-portals-to-increase-engagement-in-patients-with-cancer
#5
REVIEW
Elizabeth S Rodriguez
OBJECTIVES: To review patient portals which serve as a tool for patient engagement by increasing access to electronic health care information and expanding ways to communicate with health care providers. DATA SOURCES: Reviews of the literature and first-hand experience. CONCLUSION: Meaningful Use requirements propelled the design and development of patient portals in recent years. Patient engagement in oncology can improve quality of life and outcomes...
April 3, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29622519/social-media-use-in-cancer-care
#6
REVIEW
Joni Watson
OBJECTIVE: To describe the increasing professional use of social media within oncology health care practice. DATA SOURCES: Peer-reviewed and lay publications. CONCLUSION: Social media has changed the communication landscape over the last 15 years. An integral part of worldwide culture, oncology health care professionals can utilize social media to listen, learn, engage, and co-create to advance cancer care. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Nurses must be aware of the professional uses for social media, how to use the media, and where to find evidence supporting health care social media efforts within cancer care...
April 2, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29609829/is-the-virtual-colonoscopy-a-replacement-for-optical-colonoscopy
#7
REVIEW
Andrew Guinigundo
OBJECTIVE: To examine the viability of colon cancer screening with computed tomography colonography, also known as virtual colonoscopy. DATA SOURCES: Clinical guidelines, published medical research. CONCLUSION: Virtual colonoscopy, under the right circumstances, is an accurate viable screening tool for patients who may not otherwise desire to or are not able to participate in traditional colonoscopy. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Nurses should be aware that routine colon cancer screening is recommended starting at age 50...
March 30, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29606538/the-evolution-of-radiation-therapy-in-treating-cancer
#8
REVIEW
Dorothy Abshire, Matthew K Lang
OBJECTIVES: Describe the significant changes that have occurred to elevate radiation therapy as a significant modality in treating cancer. DATA SOURCES: Peer-reviewed and lay publications. CONCLUSION: Radiation has been used in medicine since its discovery in the 19th century. Since the start of the 20th century, radiation has been increasingly used to diagnose and treat cancer. Although, radiation therapy was often known to destroy healthy tissue in its attempt to kill cancer cells, technological advancements have allowed for precise and accurate therapy, providing a viable option as a cure for individuals diagnosed with cancer...
March 29, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29606537/introduction
#9
EDITORIAL
Joni Watson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 29, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29606536/the-rise-of-big-data-in-oncology
#10
REVIEW
Kristen L Fessele
OBJECTIVES: To describe big data and data science in the context of oncology nursing care. DATA SOURCES: Peer-reviewed and lay publications. CONCLUSION: The rapid expansion of real-world evidence from sources such as the electronic health record, genomic sequencing, administrative claims and other data sources has outstripped the ability of clinicians and researchers to manually review and analyze it. To promote high-quality, high-value cancer care, big data platforms must be constructed from standardized data sources to support extraction of meaningful, comparable insights...
March 29, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29373163/social-determinants-of-lgbt-cancer-health-inequities
#11
REVIEW
Alicia K Matthews, Elizabeth Breen, Priyoth Kittiteerasack
OBJECTIVES: To describe the extant literature on social determinants of health as they relate to the cancer disparities and to highlight the research findings relating to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations. DATA SOURCES: Published scientific literature and clinical literature, and published reports from the World Health Organization and US Department of Health and Human Services. CONCLUSION: The larger literature on health inequities is moving beyond individual-level predictors of risk to evaluate the influence of social determinants of health on the persistent health inequalities in a population...
February 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29338894/lgbt-populations-barriers-to-cancer-care
#12
REVIEW
Ulrike Boehmer
OBJECTIVE: To describe lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals' barriers to accessing and receiving quality cancer care. DATA SOURCES: Published data on cancer care and studies of LGBT individuals. CONCLUSION: There is a clustering of barriers among LGBT individuals, which suggests multiple inequities exist in LGBT individuals' cancer care, although data on disparities along the cancer control continuum are not consistently available...
February 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29336921/legal-and-policy-issues-for-lgbt-patients-with-cancer-or-at-elevated-risk-of-cancer
#13
REVIEW
Sean R Cahill
OBJECTIVE: To understand the major legal and policy issues for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) cancer patients. DATA SOURCES: LGBT health policy research. CONCLUSION: Major policy issues include discrimination, lack of cultural competency and clinically appropriate care, insurance coverage, family recognition, and sexual orientation and gender identity data collection. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Nurses play a major role in providing affirming and competent care to LGBT cancer patients...
February 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29329960/the-future-of-lgbt-cancer-care-practice-and-research-implications
#14
REVIEW
David Rice, Matthew B Schabath
OBJECTIVES: To synthesize state of the knowledge collected in this volume and propose future directions for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) cancer practice, education, research, and advocacy. DATA SOURCES: Current and extant literature. CONCLUSION: Health care disparities that are known but not yet fully elucidated in the LGBT population carry into the cancer arena. Substantially more effort is required in the domains of patient care, nursing practice, nursing and patient-facing services provider education, patient education, nursing and interprofessional research, governmental commitment, professional organization action, and patient advocacy...
February 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29325817/cancer-screening-considerations-and-cancer-screening-uptake-for-lesbian-gay-bisexual-and-transgender-persons
#15
REVIEW
Marc Ceres, Gwendolyn P Quinn, Matthew Loscalzo, David Rice
OBJECTIVES: To describe the current state of cancer screening and uptake for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons and to propose cancer screening considerations for LGBT persons. DATA SOURCES: Current and historic published literature on cancer screening and LGBT cancer screening; published national guidelines. CONCLUSION: Despite known cancer risks for members of the LGBT community, cancer screening rates are often low, and there are gaps in screening recommendations for LGBT persons...
February 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29325816/lgbt-cultural-competence-and-interventions-to-help-oncology-nurses-and-other-health-care-providers
#16
REVIEW
Asa Radix, Shail Maingi
OBJECTIVES: To define and give an overview of the importance of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) cultural competency and offer some initial steps on how to improve the quality of care provided by oncology nurses and other health care professionals. DATA SOURCES: A review of the existing literature on cultural competency. CONCLUSION: LGBT patients experience cancer and several other diseases at higher rates than the rest of the population...
February 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29325815/intersectionality-and-the-lgbt-cancer-patient
#17
REVIEW
Penny Damaskos, Beau Amaya, RuthAnn Gordon, Chasity Burrows Walters
OBJECTIVES: To present the ways in which race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexual orientation interact in the context of cancer risk, access to care, and treatment by health care providers. Cancer risk factors, access to care, and treatment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients are discussed within the context of intersectionality and cultural humility. DATA SOURCES: Peer reviewed articles, cancer organizations, and clinical practice. CONCLUSION: LGBT patients have multiple identities that intersect to create unique experiences...
February 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29310848/erratum-to-nurse-handoff-communication-seminars-in-oncology-nursing-volume-33-issue-5-december-2017-pages-536-543
#18
Anne Ray Streeter, Nancy Grant Harrington
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29306523/palliative-and-end-of-life-care-for-lesbian-gay-bisexual-and-transgender-lgbt-cancer-patients-and-their-caregivers
#19
REVIEW
Kristin G Cloyes, William Hull, Andra Davis
OBJECTIVE: To identify the unique needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) cancer patients and caregivers, and review recommendations supporting more effective and inclusive palliative and end-of-life care. DATA SOURCES: Published research and clinical guidelines. CONCLUSION: Transitions in care raise particular challenges for LGBT patients, including provider communication, perceptions of safety and acceptance, and assessing and respecting patients' definitions of family and spirituality...
February 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29284588/the-personal-experience-of-lgbt-patients-with-cancer
#20
REVIEW
Ellen Carr
OBJECTIVES: To capture the perspectives from lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals diagnosed treated for cancer. DATA SOURCES: Four LGBT individuals diagnosed and treated for cancer. CONCLUSION: Care for the LGBT patient is based on sensitivity and awareness to LGBT issues and concerns. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Nurses caring for the LGBT cancer patient provide that care in a context of awareness and sensitivity...
February 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
journal
journal
29038
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"