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Seminars in Oncology Nursing

Alicia K Matthews, Elizabeth Breen, Priyoth Kittiteerasack
OBJECTIVES: To describe the extant literature on social determinants of health as they relate to the cancer disparities and to highlight the research findings relating to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations. DATA SOURCES: Published scientific literature and clinical literature, and published reports from the World Health Organization and US Department of Health and Human Services. CONCLUSION: The larger literature on health inequities is moving beyond individual-level predictors of risk to evaluate the influence of social determinants of health on the persistent health inequalities in a population...
January 17, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Ulrike Boehmer
OBJECTIVE: To describe lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals' barriers to accessing and receiving quality cancer care. DATA SOURCES: Published data on cancer care and studies of LGBT individuals. CONCLUSION: There is a clustering of barriers among LGBT individuals, which suggests multiple inequities exist in LGBT individuals' cancer care, although data on disparities along the cancer control continuum are not consistently available...
January 12, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Sean R Cahill
OBJECTIVE: To understand the major legal and policy issues for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) cancer patients. DATA SOURCES: LGBT health policy research. CONCLUSION: Major policy issues include discrimination, lack of cultural competency and clinically appropriate care, insurance coverage, family recognition, and sexual orientation and gender identity data collection. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Nurses play a major role in providing affirming and competent care to LGBT cancer patients...
January 11, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
David Rice, Matthew B Schabath
OBJECTIVES: To synthesize state of the knowledge collected in this volume and propose future directions for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) cancer practice, education, research, and advocacy. DATA SOURCES: Current and extant literature. CONCLUSION: Health care disparities that are known but not yet fully elucidated in the LGBT population carry into the cancer arena. Substantially more effort is required in the domains of patient care, nursing practice, nursing and patient-facing services provider education, patient education, nursing and interprofessional research, governmental commitment, professional organization action, and patient advocacy...
January 9, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Marc Ceres, Gwendolyn P Quinn, Matthew Loscalzo, David Rice
OBJECTIVES: To describe the current state of cancer screening and uptake for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons and to propose cancer screening considerations for LGBT persons. DATA SOURCES: Current and historic published literature on cancer screening and LGBT cancer screening; published national guidelines. CONCLUSION: Despite known cancer risks for members of the LGBT community, cancer screening rates are often low, and there are gaps in screening recommendations for LGBT persons...
January 8, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Asa Radix, Shail Maingi
OBJECTIVES: To define and give an overview of the importance of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) cultural competency and offer some initial steps on how to improve the quality of care provided by oncology nurses and other health care professionals. DATA SOURCES: A review of the existing literature on cultural competency. CONCLUSION: LGBT patients experience cancer and several other diseases at higher rates than the rest of the population...
January 8, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Penny Damaskos, Beau Amaya, RuthAnn Gordon, Chasity Burrows Walters
OBJECTIVES: To present the ways in which race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexual orientation interact in the context of cancer risk, access to care, and treatment by health care providers. Cancer risk factors, access to care, and treatment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients are discussed within the context of intersectionality and cultural humility. DATA SOURCES: Peer reviewed articles, cancer organizations, and clinical practice. CONCLUSION: LGBT patients have multiple identities that intersect to create unique experiences...
January 8, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Anne Ray Streeter, Nancy Grant Harrington
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 5, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Kristin G Cloyes, William Hull, Andra Davis
OBJECTIVE: To identify the unique needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) cancer patients and caregivers, and review recommendations supporting more effective and inclusive palliative and end-of-life care. DATA SOURCES: Published research and clinical guidelines. CONCLUSION: Transitions in care raise particular challenges for LGBT patients, including provider communication, perceptions of safety and acceptance, and assessing and respecting patients' definitions of family and spirituality...
January 3, 2018: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Ellen Carr
OBJECTIVES: To capture the perspectives from lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals diagnosed treated for cancer. DATA SOURCES: Four LGBT individuals diagnosed and treated for cancer. CONCLUSION: Care for the LGBT patient is based on sensitivity and awareness to LGBT issues and concerns. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Nurses caring for the LGBT cancer patient provide that care in a context of awareness and sensitivity...
December 25, 2017: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Liz Margolies, Carlton G Brown
OBJECTIVE: To review the current state of knowledge about cancer in lesbians, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people by focusing on four major issues across the cancer continuum including: 1) lack of data collection on sexual orientation and gender identity; 2) need for a culturally competent workforce; 3) the need for a culturally competent health care system; and 4) creating LGBT tailored patient/client information and education. DATA SOURCES: Published literature...
December 25, 2017: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Carlton G Brown, Liz Margolies
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 21, 2017: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Charles Kamen
OBJECTIVE: To discuss lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT)-specific survivorship issues including: integrating sexual and gender minority identities with cancer survivor identities; coordinating medical care and disclosing identities to health care providers; dealing with late effects of treatment; and addressing LGBT family and relationship issues. DATA SOURCES: Published articles, quotes from an online survey of 311 LGBT survivors. CONCLUSION: The transition from active cancer treatment to survivorship presents challenges, and LGBT cancer survivors may face additional challenges as they enter the survivorship phase...
December 20, 2017: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Joy Goldsmith, Amanda J Young, Lisa Dale, M Paige Powell
OBJECTIVES: To explore an mHealth resource to support the limited-English-proficient cancer family caregiver. DATA SOURCES: Structured interviews with oncology clinic providers to assess a nurse-delivered resource to support health literacy and decision-making along the cancer trajectory. CONCLUSION: Limitations in communicating about oncology care with limited-English caregivers is evident. The mHealth resource examined here shows promise to improve relational health literacy between the oncology nurse and family caregiver...
December 2017: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Deborah A Boyle, Susan Barbour, Wendy Anderson, Janice Noort, Michelle Grywalski, Jeannette Myer, Heather Hermann
OBJECTIVES: To describe the development, launch, implementation, and outcomes of a unique multisite collaborative (ie, IMPACT-ICU [Integrating Multidisciplinary Palliative Care into the ICU]) to teach ICU nurses communication skills specific to palliative care. To identify options for collaboration between oncology and critical care nurses when integrating palliation into nursing care planning. DATA SOURCES: Published literature and collective experiences of the authors in the provision of onco-critical-palliative care...
December 2017: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Myra Glajchen, Anna Goehring
OBJECTIVES: To describe the family meeting in palliative and end-of-life care, highlighting the role of the oncology nurse. Specific strategies will be provided for pre-meeting preparation, communication, and follow-up activities. DATA SOURCES: A conceptual framework drawn from family and communication theory, and best practices from the clinical, research, nursing, and palliative care literature. CONCLUSION: Working with patients and families is complex, but the family meeting is a promising tool and a potential quality indicator in palliative care...
December 2017: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Lee Ellington, Jacob Billitteri, Maija Reblin, Margaret F Clayton
OBJECTIVES: To provide a definition of spirituality, define the scope and nature of spiritual care communication, describe how to initiate communication about, and elicit, a spiritual history, and introduce the AMEN protocol to support patient/family hopes for a miracle. DATA SOURCES: Literature review. CONCLUSION: Spiritual communication is important throughout cancer care. Nurses can assess and integrate patient and family caregivers' spiritual needs in clinical care by practicing self-awareness and engaging in spiritual care communication strategies...
December 2017: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Sandra L Ragan, Elisa Kanter
OBJECTIVES: To provide a brief history on narrative medicine and highlight its importance in providing quality patient care. DATA SOURCES: Explains narrative medicine using published, peer-reviewed literature and highlights some of the literary, medical, sociological, and communication perspectives that contributed to the narrative medicine movement. CONCLUSION: A commitment to the patient-provider relationship and knowing the patient's story is a critical aspect in providing quality cancer care...
December 2017: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Elaine Wittenberg, Haley Buller, Betty Ferrell, Marianna Koczywas, Tami Borneman
OBJECTIVES: To describe a family caregiver communication typology and demonstrate identifiable communication challenges among four caregiver types: Manager, Carrier, Partner, and Lone. DATA SOURCES: Case studies based on interviews with oncology family caregivers. CONCLUSION: Each caregiver type demonstrates unique communication challenges that can be identified. Recognition of a specific caregiver type will help nurses to adapt their own communication to provide tailored support...
December 2017: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Denice Economou, Anne Reb
OBJECTIVES: To discuss communication needs that relate to transitioning care for cancer survivors and strategies to facilitate patient-centered communication. DATA SOURCES: National Cancer Institute monograph and peer reviewed articles related to survivorship and communication. CONCLUSION: Key communication tasks in survivorship include managing uncertainty, exchanging information, and enabling self-management. These tasks inform assessment strategies and interventions in survivorship care planning...
December 2017: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
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