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Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916914/the-effects-of-protein-and-fiber-content-on-gut-structure-and-function-in-zebrafish-danio-rerio
#1
Samantha C Leigh, Bao-Quang Nguyen-Phuc, Donovan P German
Chemical reactor theory (CRT) suggests that the digestive tract functions as a chemical reactor for processing food. Presumably, gut structure and function should match diet to ensure adequate nutrient and energy uptake to maintain performance. Within CRT, dietary biochemical composition is the most important factor affecting gut structure and function in vertebrates. We fed Danio rerio (zebrafish) diets ranging from high- to moderate- to low-quality (i.e., ranging from high-protein, low-fiber to low-protein, high-fiber), and observed how gut length and surface area, as well as the activity levels of digestive enzymes (amylase, maltase, trypsin, aminopeptidase, and lipase) shifted in response to these dietary changes...
September 15, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28819793/the-mechanisms-underlying-the-production-of-discontinuous-gas-exchange-cycles-in-insects
#2
REVIEW
Philip G D Matthews
This review examines the control of gas exchange in insects, specifically examining what mechanisms could explain the emergence of discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs). DGCs are gas exchange patterns consisting of alternating breath-hold periods and bouts of gas exchange. While all insects are capable of displaying a continuous pattern of gas exchange, this episodic pattern is known to occur within only some groups of insects and then only sporadically or during certain phases of their life cycle. Investigations into DGCs have tended to emphasise the role of chemosensory thresholds in triggering spiracle opening as critical for producing these gas exchange patterns...
August 17, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28766065/body-temperatures-of-hibernating-little-brown-bats-reveal-pronounced-behavioural-activity-during-deep-torpor-and-suggest-a-fever-response-during-white-nose-syndrome
#3
Heather W Mayberry, Liam P McGuire, Craig K R Willis
Hibernating animals use torpor [reduced body temperature (T b) and metabolic rate] to reduce energy expenditure during winter. Periodic arousals to normal T b are energetically expensive, so hibernators trade off arousal benefits against energetic costs. This is especially important for bats with white-nose syndrome (WNS), a fungal disease causing increased arousal frequency. Little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) with WNS show upregulation of endogenous pyrogens and sickness behaviour. Therefore, we hypothesized that WNS should cause a fever response characterized by elevated T b...
August 1, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28761984/embryonic-and-post-embryonic-development-inside-wolf-spiders-egg-sac-with-special-emphasis-on-the-vitellus
#4
M Trabalon, F Ruhland, A Laino, M Cunningham, F Garcia
The development of Pardosa saltans wolf spiders inside an egg sac includes two periods: an embryonic period and a post-embryonic period after hatching. We investigated spiderlings' energy expenditure to assess energetic costs during the different embryonic and post-embryonic developmental stages during which they are confined within their egg sac. We focused on the following developmental stages: egg, embryonic stages 1 and 2, and two stages, separated by a moult, during post-embryogenesis inside the egg sac: "juvenile instars 1 and 2" until emergence of 2 instar juveniles from their egg sac...
July 31, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28756562/life-history-written-in-blood-erythrocyte-parameters-in-a-small-hibernator-the-edible-dormouse
#5
Nadine Havenstein, Franz Langer, Joanna Fietz
The oxygen delivery system is one major determinant of the performance of vertebrates and responds sensitively to a variety of internal and environmental factors. To understand physiological mechanisms underlying variations of fitness, we investigated effects of demanding conditions associated with certain life-history events, food availability, and population density on the oxygen delivery system in free-ranging edible dormice (Glis glis). We sampled blood (n = 248) and urine (n = 319), performed an erythrocyte haemogram and visually determined the presence of haemoglobinuria...
July 29, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28755031/interspecies-differences-in-plasma-concentrations-of-25-hydroxyvitamin-d3-and-dermal-vitamin-d-synthesis-of-kiwi-apteryx-mantelli-tuatara-sphenodon-punctatus-and-new-zealand-sea-lions-phocarctos-hookeri
#6
Madhumita S Kale, Keren E Dittmer, Wendi D Roe, Brett D Gartrell
Vitamin D plays a central role in calcium homeostasis of most vertebrates, and is obtained in different species through diet, dermal synthesis, or a combination of both. The aim of this study was to determine the predominant routes of Vitamin D synthesis in three disparate species, brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli), tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus), and New Zealand sea lions (Phocarctos hookeri). We surveyed plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 and D3, analysed environmental conditions and life history factors, and determined the ability of skin samples to synthesise Vitamin D3 on exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation...
July 28, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28726024/thermal-physiology-of-three-sympatric-and-syntopic-liolaemidae-lizards-in-cold-and-arid-environments-of-patagonia-argentina
#7
F Duran, E L Kubisch, Jorgelina M Boretto
The thermal physiology determines the whole biology of ectotherm organisms, by limiting their acquisition and allocation of resources. Herein, we aim to add knowledge on how different species use the thermal resources when they coexist in a habitat, studying the thermal physiology of three sympatric and syntopic liolaemid lizards, Phymaturus querque, Phymaturus zapalensis, and Liolaemus elongatus during the summer season. We measured the body temperatures at capture places, the operative microenvironmental temperatures in the field, and the preferred body temperature in an experimental thermal gradient in the laboratory...
July 19, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28721476/post-prandial-physiology-and-intestinal-morphology-of-the-pacific-hagfish-eptatretus-stoutii
#8
Alyssa M Weinrauch, Alexander M Clifford, Greg G Goss
Hagfishes are unique to the vertebrate lineage in that they acquire dissolved nutrients across multiple epithelia including the intestine, gill, and skin. This feat has been attributed to their immersive feeding behavior that likely simultaneously provides benefits (nutrient rich) and potentially adverse (hypercapnia, hypoxia, high environmental ammonia) physiological effects. Examinations have been conducted of the ex vivo transport capabilities of specific nutrients as well as in vivo effects of the hypothesized feeding environments, yet the physiological effects of feeding itself have never been elucidated...
July 18, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28695272/cardiovascular-effects-of-histamine-in-three-widely-diverse-species-of-reptiles
#9
Nini Skovgaard, Augusto S Abe, Edwin W Taylor, Tobias Wang
The cardiovascular system of vertebrates is regulated by a vast number of regulatory factors, including histamine. In pythons, histamine induces a strong tachycardia and dilates the systemic vasculature, which resembles the cardiovascular response to the elevated metabolic rate during digestion. In fact, there is an important role of increased histaminergic tone on the heart during the initial 24 h of digestion in pythons. Whilst the cardiovascular effects of histamine are well studied in pythons, little is known about the effects in other groups of reptiles...
July 10, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28691154/digestive-enzyme-ratios-are-good-indicators-of-hatchling-yolk-reserve-and-digestive-gland-maturation-in-early-life-stages-of-cuttlefish-sepia-officinalis-l-application-of-these-new-tools-in-ecology-and-aquaculture
#10
Georges Safi, A S Martinez, C Le Pabic, E Le Bihan, J P Robin, N Koueta
In Sepia officinalis (Linnaeus, 1758), the digestive gland matures during the first month post-hatching, while a shift from intracellular acid to extracellular alkaline digestion occurs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of using enzymatic ratios for the description of digestive system maturation in early life stages of S. officinalis. Second, it is intended to apply these new tools as eco-physiological indicators for understanding the impact of cuttlefish eggs' life history from different spawning sites of the English Channel on digestive performance of juveniles...
July 10, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28674771/a-review-of-the-physiology-of-a-survival-expert-of-big-freeze-deep-snow-and-an-empty-stomach-the-boreal-raccoon-dog-nyctereutes-procyonoides
#11
REVIEW
Anne-Mari Mustonen, Petteri Nieminen
The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is an invasive canid originating from eastern Asia. Here, we review its physiological adaptations to wintering, with an emphasis on northern Europe, where the raccoon dog spends the coldest part of the year in winter sleep. The timing of physiological changes related to wintering is connected to photoperiod by melatonin. In preparation to winter, raccoon dogs display autumnal hyperphagia and fattening probably regulated by the interaction of several peptide hormones...
July 4, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28668996/dietary-l-arginine-accelerates-pupation-and-promotes-high-protein-levels-but-induces-oxidative-stress-and-reduces-fecundity-and-life-span-in-drosophila-melanogaster
#12
Maria M Bayliak, Maria P Lylyk, Oksana V Maniukh, Janet M Storey, Kenneth B Storey, Volodymyr I Lushchak
L-Arginine, a precursor of many amino acids and of nitric oxide, plays multiple important roles in nutrient metabolism and regulation of physiological functions. In this study, the effects of L-arginine-enriched diets on selected physiological responses and metabolic processes were assessed in Drosophila melanogaster. Dietary L-arginine at concentrations 5-20 mM accelerated larval development and increased body mass, and total protein concentrations in third instar larvae, but did not affect these parameters when diets contained 100 mM arginine...
July 1, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432393/more-functions-of-torpor-and-their-roles-in-a-changing-world
#13
Julia Nowack, Clare Stawski, Fritz Geiser
Increased winter survival by reducing energy expenditure in adult animals is often viewed as the primary function of torpor. However, torpor has many other functions that ultimately increase the survival of heterothermic mammals and birds. In this review, we summarize new findings revealing that animals use torpor to cope with the conditions during and after natural disasters, including fires, storms, and heat waves. Furthermore, we suggest that torpor, which also prolongs longevity and was likely crucial for survival of mammals during the time of the dinosaur extinctions, will be advantageous in a changing world...
July 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28417150/torpor-patterns-in-common-hamsters-with-and-without-access-to-food-stores
#14
Carina Siutz, Eva Millesi
Hibernating species significantly reduce energy expenditure during winter by entering torpor. Nevertheless, the various benefits of hibernation might be counteracted by negative effects of torpor such as immune depression, oxidative stress, or neuronal impairment. Considering these trade-offs, adequate energy reserves could allow animals to reduce the time spent in torpor or the extent of metabolic depression. Common hamsters use food stores during hibernation and previously documented high individual variations in body temperature patterns during winter could, therefore, be related to differences in external energy reserves...
July 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28378088/central-activation-of-the-a1-adenosine-receptor-in-fed-mice-recapitulates-only-some-of-the-attributes-of-daily-torpor
#15
Maria A Vicent, Ethan D Borre, Steven J Swoap
Mice enter bouts of daily torpor, drastically reducing metabolic rate, core body temperature (T b), and heart rate (HR), in response to reduced caloric intake. Because central adenosine activation has been shown to induce a torpor-like state in the arctic ground squirrel, and blocking the adenosine-1 (A1) receptor prevents daily torpor, we hypothesized that central activation of the A1 adenosine receptors would induce a bout of natural torpor in mice. To test the hypothesis, mice were subjected to four different hypothermia bouts: natural torpor, forced hypothermia (FH), isoflurane-anesthesia, and an intracerebroventricular injection of the selective A1 receptor agonist N(6-)cyclohexyladenosine (CHA)...
July 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332020/temperature-effects-on-the-activity-shape-and-storage-of-platelets-from-13-lined-ground-squirrels
#16
Scott Cooper, Sarah Lloyd, Anthony Koch, Xingxing Lin, Katie Dobbs, Thomas Theisen, Matt Zuberbuehler, Kaley Bernhardt, Michael Gyorfi, Tanner Tenpas, Skyler Hying, Sarah Mortimer, Christine Lamont, Marcus Lehmann, Keith Neeves
The objective of this study is to determine how a hibernating mammal avoids the formation of blood clots under periods of low blood flow. A microfluidic vascular injury model was performed to differentiate the effects of temperature and shear rate on platelet adhesion to collagen. Human and ground squirrel whole blood was incubated at 15 or 37 °C and then passed through a microfluidic chamber over a 250-µm strip of type I fibrillar collagen at that temperature and the shear rates of 50 or 300 s(-1) to simulate torpid and aroused conditions, respectively...
July 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332018/seasonal-loss-and-resumption-of-circadian-rhythms-in-hibernating-arctic-ground-squirrels
#17
Cory T Williams, Maya Radonich, Brian M Barnes, C Loren Buck
Circadian clocks are near universal among organisms and play a key role in coordinating physiological and metabolic functions to anticipate or coincide with predictable daily changes in the physical and social environment. However, whether circadian rhythms persist and are functionally important during hibernation in all mammals is currently unclear. We examined whether circadian rhythms of body temperature (T b) persist during multi-day, steady-state torpor and investigated the association between timing of animal emergence, exposure to light, and resumption of activity and T b rhythms in free-living and captive male arctic ground squirrels...
July 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324158/the-influence-of-sex-and-diet-on-the-characteristics-of-hibernation-in-syrian-hamsters
#18
Marie Trefna, Maaike Goris, Cynthia M C Thissen, Vera A Reitsema, Jojanneke J Bruintjes, Edwin L de Vrij, Hjalmar R Bouma, Ate S Boerema, Robert H Henning
Research on deep hibernators almost exclusively uses species captured from the wild or from local breeding. An exception is Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), the only standard laboratory animal showing deep hibernation. In deep hibernators, several factors influence hibernation quality, including body mass, sex and diet. We examined hibernation quality in commercially obtained Syrian hamsters in relation to body mass, sex and a diet enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Animals (M/F:30/30, 12 weeks of age) were obtained from Harlan (IN, USA) and individually housed at 21 °C and L:D 14:10 until 20 weeks of age, followed by L:D 8:16 until 27 weeks...
July 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28321493/the-costs-of-locomotor-activity-maximum-body-temperatures-and-the-use-of-torpor-during-the-active-season-in-edible-dormice
#19
Claudia Bieber, Jessica S Cornils, Franz Hoelzl, Sylvain Giroud, Thomas Ruf
Measuring T b during the active season can provide information about the timing of reproduction and the use of short bouts of torpor and may be used as a proxy for the locomotor activity of animals (i.e., maximum T b). This kind of information is especially important to understand life-history strategies and energetic costs and demands in hibernating mammals. We investigated T b throughout the active season in edible dormice (Glis glis), since they (i) have an expensive arboreal life-style, (ii) are known to show short bouts of torpor, and (iii) are adapted to pulsed resources (mast of beech trees)...
July 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28631010/the-metabolic-cost-of-nesting-body-condition-and-blood-parameters-of-caiman-crocodilus-and-melanosuchus-niger-in-central-amazonia
#20
José António Lemos Barão-Nóbrega, Boris Marioni, Robinson Botero-Arias, António José Arsénia Nogueira, Emerson Silva Lima, William Ernest Magnusson, Ronis Da Silveira, Jaydione Luiz Marcon
Although nesting ecology is well studied in several crocodilian species, it is not known how nest attendance influences physiology and body condition of nesting females. In this study, we describe body condition and serum biochemical values of nesting female, non-nesting female and male spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus) and black caiman (Melanosuchus niger) in two areas of Central Amazonia. We also evaluated the effect of nest age and nest distance to water on body condition and blood parameters of nesting females...
June 19, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
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