Read by QxMD icon Read

Journal of Emergency Medicine

Richard J Hamilton, Vadim Keyfes, Sahil S Banka
BACKGROUND: Synthetic cannabinoids (SC) are recreational designer drugs intended to mimic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol while surreptitiously circumventing classification by the Drug Enforcement Administration. CASE REPORT: A 50-year-old black male arrived in the Emergency Department transported by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) for altered mental status after complaining of chest pain associated with smoking SCs. EMS found the patient with an empty foil pack labeled "Scooby Snax Limited Edition Blueberry Potpourri...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Mari Siegel
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 18, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Daniel Kolinsky, Samuel M Keim, Brian G Cohn, Evan S Schwarz, Donald M Yealy
BACKGROUND: The current standards for domestic emergency medical services suggest that all patients suspected of opioid overdose be transported to the emergency department for evaluation and treatment. This includes patients who improve after naloxone administration in the field because of concerns for rebound toxicity. However, various emergency medical services systems release such patients at the scene after a 15- to 20-min observation period as long as they return to their baseline...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Tammy T Nguyen, Bethany Baker, Jeffrey D Ferguson
BACKGROUND: Ketamine is a cyclohexamine derivative that acts as a noncompetitive N-methyl D-aspartate receptor antagonist. Its use for procedural sedation is recommended by national clinical policy. However, its immunogenic potential is not well documented. CASE REPORT: We report a case of allergic reaction associated with the administration of intravenous ketamine for procedural sedation in a 16-year-old male. Minutes after administration, the patient developed a morbilliform, erythematous rash that extended to the upper and lower torso and resolved with intravenous diphenhydramine...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Seyedhossein Seyedhosseini Davarani, Hadi Mirfazaelian
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 18, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Christopher Eric McCoy, Angelica Loza-Gomez, James Lee Puckett, Samantha Costantini, Patrick Penalosa, Craig Anderson, Carl Schultz
BACKGROUND: The association between ambulation at the scene of a motor vehicle collision (MVC) and spinal injury has never been quantified. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between ambulation and spinal injury in patients involved in a MVC. METHODS: Prospective analytical-observational cohort study. Inclusion: patients sustaining traumatic injury in a MVC. Exclusion: < 18 years old, pregnancy. PRIMARY OUTCOME: spinal injury defined as injury to the cervical, thoracic, or lumbar spinal cord, bones, or ligaments...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Michael D Witting, Siamak Moayedi, Kathy Dunning, Lisa S Babin, Brad M Cogan
BACKGROUND: After an index case of contrast-associated compartment syndrome, an urban hospital instituted a protocol limiting high-speed injection to intravenous (IV) lines started proximal to the forearm and testing those lines before contrast injection. OBJECTIVE: In this article, we estimate the safety and efficacy of high-speed injection using this protocol in patients with IV lines inserted under ultrasound guidance. METHODS: In an ambispective study, we enrolled prospective cohorts of ED patients requiring high-speed radiographic contrast media injection (≥3...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Li Liu, Wanjun Chen, Xiaoye Lu, Keji Zhang, Changqing Zhu
BACKGROUND: Pyogenic liver abscesses have become common in emergency departments (EDs) in recent years in Shanghai, China due to a variety of risk factors contributory to the disease. OBJECTIVE: To review our experience in managing pyogenic liver abscesses to aid in the current management of this complex condition. METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted to collect and analyze information from adult patients diagnosed with liver hepatic abscesses who were admitted to Ren Ji Hospital during the period from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2015...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Nathan Zapolsky, Michael Heller, Mark Felberbaum, Jeremy Rose, Eric Steinberg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 17, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Katherine Moore, Rachel Haroz
BACKGROUND: Intractable bone pain is a notorious adverse effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factors (G-CSFs), such as pegfilgrastim and filgrastim, which are given to help prevent neutropenia in patients who are undergoing chemotherapy. G-CSF-induced bone pain is surprisingly common and often refractory to treatment with conventional analgesics. CASE REPORT: This article describes an emergency department case of opiate and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-resistant pegfilgrastim-induced bone pain that was successfully alleviated with 10 mg of oral loratadine, allowing for discharge home...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Nika Byrne, Jillian H Plonsker, Lee A Tan, Richard W Byrne, Lorenzo F Munoz
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 14, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Anthony J Weekes, Angela K Johnson, Daniel Troha, Gregory Thacker, Jordan Chanler-Berat, Michael Runyon
BACKGROUND: Right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in pulmonary embolism (PE) has been associated with increased morbidity. Tools for RVD identification are not well defined. The prognostic value of RVD markers to predict serious adverse events (SAE) during hospitalization is unclear. OBJECTIVE: Prospectively compare the incidence of SAE in normotensive emergency department patients with PE based upon RVD by goal-directed echocardiography (GDE), cardiac biomarkers, and right-to-left ventricle ratio by computed tomography (CT)...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Mary P Henman
BACKGROUND: A suicidal person with a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order presents an ethical dilemma to the emergency physician. Many believe that suicide is an irrational action, and therefore, all suicide attempts must be treated. Others believe a DNR order should be respected even in the setting of a suicide attempt. CASE REPORT: An elderly woman with a known terminal illness presented to the emergency department after a suspected suicide attempt. She had a DNR order during her previous hospitalization...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Brit Long, Alex Koyfman
BACKGROUND: Ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation are the causes of approximately 300,000 deaths per year in the United States. VT is classified based on hemodynamic status and appearance. Stable, monomorphic VT treatment is controversial. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to provide emergency physicians with an evidence-based review of the medical management of stable, monomorphic VT. DISCUSSION: Stable, monomorphic VT is part of a larger class of ventricular dysrhythmias defined by a rate of at least 120 beats/min with QRS > 120 ms without regularly occurring P:QRS association...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Jonathan Kei, Donald P Mebust
BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that an adult 8.0 endotracheal tube (ETT) connected to a neonatal meconium aspirator would improve suctioning during emergent endotracheal intubation compared to the Yankauer suction instrument, the standard tool used by emergency physicians. OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of a Yankauer vs. an ETT-meconium aspirator set-up in suctioning liquids of different viscosities. METHODS: The Yankauer and ETT-meconium aspirator device underwent a head-to-head timed comparison, suctioning 250 mL of three different fluids, varying in viscosity...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Kerrin C DePeter, Stephen M Blumberg, Sarah Dienstag Becker, James A Meltzer
BACKGROUND: Despite being an effective analgesic for children with fractures, some clinicians may avoid prescribing ibuprofen due to its potentially harmful effect on bone healing. OBJECTIVE: To determine if exposure to ibuprofen is associated with an increased risk of bone healing complications in children with fractures. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of children aged 6 months to 17 years who presented to the pediatric emergency department (PED) with a fracture of the tibia, femur, humerus, scaphoid, or fifth metatarsus and who followed up with the orthopedic service...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Tiffany Healey, Clifford Buckley, Matthew Mollman
BACKGROUND: Brugada syndrome is a genetic disorder that increases an individual's risk for sudden cardiac death and ventricular dysrhythmias that was first described by the Brugada brothers in 1992. Brugada syndrome is characterized by an atypical electrocardiogram pattern that includes a bundle branch block and ST-segment elevation in the precordial leads. CASE REPORT: A 74-year-old man had a cardiac arrest at the time of a low-speed motor vehicle collision. When emergency medical services arrived, the patient was in torsades de pointes...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Kristen Jijelava, Hongvan Le, Jack Parker, Jeffrey Yee
BACKGROUND: Ocular chemical injuries due to accidental exposure or application of cyanoacrylate, commonly known as "superglue," have increased over the past 30 years. However, current treatment options to relieve eyelid adhesions due to cyanoacrylate applications are difficult to successfully execute and can require sedation or general anesthesia. Here we describe a simple technique to release eyelid adhesions due to cyanoacrylate, or other adhesive agents, that can be successfully performed at bedside without sedation...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Sun Hwa Lee, Seokyong Ryu, Seoung Won Choi, Hye Jin Kim, Tae Kyug Kang, Sung Chan Oh, Suk Jin Cho, Jae Hoon Lee, Euy Suk Chung, Myoung Hwan Kim
BACKGROUND: Aortic dissection in pregnancy is relatively rare, but it is often fatal. The estimated incidence of aortic dissection in the general population is 2.9 per 100,000 person-years. Early recognition and treatment of aortic dissections are crucial for survival. Whereas the majority of patients who present with aortic dissection are older than 50 years of age and have a history of hypertension, younger patients with connective tissue disease, bicuspid aortic valves, or a family history of aortic dissection are also at increased risk for developing this condition...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Christopher Thom, Mary Warlaumont
BACKGROUND: Point-of-care ultrasound has an increasing role in characterizing soft-tissue infections and has been described previously in the evaluation of necrotizing fasciitis (NF). The identification of air within the soft tissues can be very suggestive of NF in the correct clinical context. CASE REPORT: A 78-year-old male presented to the emergency department with extensive lower-extremity redness and edema. A point-of-care ultrasound revealed hyperechoic areas within the soft tissues consistent with air, and the patient was taken to surgery and found to have NF...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"