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Journal of Emergency Medicine

Tony Zitek, Ignasia Tanone, Alexzza Ramos, Karina Fama, Ahmed S Ali
BACKGROUND: Urgent care centers (UCCs) can offer a cheap alternative to emergency departments (EDs) for some patients with acute complaints. However, if patients who initially present to a UCC are unnecessarily transferred to an ED, those patients may suffer undue financial harm. The group of patients transferred from UCCs to EDs have never previously been studied. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this study was to determine the fraction of transfers from a UCC to an ED that were unnecessary...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Caitlin Sandman, Benjamin Krainin, Jamie Roper
BACKGROUND: Type II diabetes mellitus (DM) is an increasingly prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality among U.S. adults, with increasing prevalence in emergency department (ED) visits. Multiple medications, such as exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 agonist, have been developed in the past decade to combat this growing problem. This medication is well documented to cause gastrointestinal upset and skin nodules at the injection site. However, currently no documented cases exist regarding manipulation of injection nodules causing increased absorption or reports demonstrating an increase in adverse drug reactions...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Eric J Rebich, Stephanie S Lee, John A Schlechter
BACKGROUND: Children with slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) are often seen by an array of medical professionals prior to diagnosis. Patients with mild slips, slips with knee pain, or bilateral slips can occasionally present a diagnostic challenge that increases the risk of a delay in diagnosis and associated complications. OBJECTIVES: This study introduces a new radiographic parameter, which we refer to as the S-sign, and analyzes its diagnostic utility on a frog-leg lateral radiograph...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Shannon M Fernando, Douglas P Barnaby, Christophe L Herry, E John Gallagher, Nathan I Shapiro, Andrew J E Seely
BACKGROUND: Early emergency department (ED) identification of septic patients at risk of deterioration is critical. Lactate is associated with 28-day mortality in admitted patients, but little evidence exists on its use in predicting short-term deterioration. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to determine the role of initial serum lactate for prediction of short-term deterioration in stable ED patients with suspected sepsis. METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study of adult ED sepsis patients...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
William J Meurer, Bradley Barth, Michael Abraham, Jerome Hoffman, Gary M Vilke, Gerard DeMers
BACKGROUND: Stroke treatment is a continuum that begins with the rapid identification of symptoms and treatment with transition to successful rehabilitation. Therapies for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) may vary based on anatomic location, interval from symptom onset, and coexisting health conditions. Successful therapy requires a seamless systematic approach with coordination from prehospital environment through acute management at medical facilities to disposition and long-term care of the patient...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Andreia de Oliveira Alves, Andreia Lopes Martin, Fred Bernardes Filho
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 12, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Kristine M Thompson, Brian T Kruse, Mary Ann S Hedges
BACKGROUND: Necrotizing fasciitis is usually associated with a surgical or traumatic wound. Clostridial myonecrosis is an uncommon but deadly infection that can develop in the absence of a wound and is often associated with occult gastrointestinal cancer or immunocompromise, or both. CASE REPORT: We report a case of catastrophic atraumatic Clostridium septicum infection in an immunocompromised host. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians most commonly associate necrotizing fasciitis with superinfection of an open wound...
March 10, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Fred Bernardes Filho, Rodolfo Mendes Queiroz, Breno Nery
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 7, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Michael Gottlieb, Brit Long, Alex Koyfman
INTRODUCTION: Aortic stenosis is a common condition among older adults that can be associated with dangerous outcomes, due to both the disease itself and its influence on other conditions. OBJECTIVE: This review provides an evidence-based summary of the current emergency department (ED) evaluation and management of aortic stenosis. DISCUSSION: Aortic stenosis refers to significant narrowing of the aortic valve and can be caused by calcific disease, congenital causes, or rheumatic valvular disease...
March 7, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Judy Zhang, Jerel Chacko, Frank Della Chiesa, Josh Greenstein, Barry Hahn
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 7, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Gail G Salvatierra, Bernice G Gulek, Baran Erdik, Deborah Bennett, Kenn B Daratha
BACKGROUND: More than a million people a year in the United States experience sepsis or sepsis-related complications, and sepsis remains the leading cause of in-hospital deaths. Unlike many other leading causes of in-hospital mortality, sepsis detection and treatment are not dependent on the presence of any technology or services that differ between tertiary and non-tertiary hospitals. OBJECTIVE: To compare sepsis mortality rates between tertiary and non-tertiary hospitals in Washington State...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Yalcin Velibey, Baris Yaylak, Tolga Sinan Guvenc, Goksel Cinier, Koray Kalenderoglu, Ozge Guzelburc, Ozlem Yildirimturk
BACKGROUND: Temporary transvenous pacemaker implantation is an important and critical procedure for emergency physicians. Traditionally, temporary pacemakers are inserted by electrocardiography (ECG) guidance in the emergency department because fluoroscopy at the bedside in an unstable patient can be limited by time and equipment availability. However, in the presence of atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, and patent foramen ovale, the pacemaker lead can be implanted inadvertently into the left ventricle or directly into the coronary sinus instead of right ventricle...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Michael Gottlieb, Brit Long, Alex Koyfman
BACKGROUND: Pharyngitis is a common disease in the emergency department (ED). Despite a relatively low incidence of complications, there are many dangerous conditions that can mimic this disease and are essential for the emergency physician to consider. OBJECTIVE: This article provides a review of the evaluation and management of group A β-hemolytic Streptococcal (GABHS) pharyngitis, as well as important medical conditions that can mimic this disease. DISCUSSION: GABHS pharyngitis often presents with fever, sore throat, tonsillar exudates, and anterior cervical lymphadenopathy...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Nicole Bertin, Gabriele Brosolo, Fabrizio Pistola, Francesco Pelizzo, Christian Marini, Franco Pertoldi, Olga Vriz
BACKGROUND: Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a bacterium of the normal oral flora of dogs and cats. Human infection is caused by animal bite but is rarely observed, mainly in immunocompromised patients. We present 2 cases of C. canimorsus infection that occurred in immunocompetent patients and caused multiorgan failure and in both cases severe neurologic involvement. CASE REPORT: In the first case, we present a 69-year-old immunocompetent woman with septic shock derived from skin and soft tissue infection after a dog's bite...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Geoffrey S Kelly, Benjamin Grandy, Julie Rice
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 6, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Mikala Pacifique, Carmen Alcala, Sean M Bryant
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 6, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Sergey Motov, Reuben Strayer, Bryan Hayes, Mark Reiter, Steven Rosenbaum, Melanie Richman, Zachary Repanshek, Scott Taylor, Benjamin Friedman, Gary Vilke, Daniel Lasoff
BACKGROUND: Pain is one of the most common reasons patients present to the emergency department (ED). Emergency physicians should be aware of the numerous opioid and nonopioid alternatives available for the treatment of pain. OBJECTIVES: To provide expert consensus guidelines for the safe and effective treatment of acute pain in the ED. METHODS: Multiple independent literature searches using PubMed were performed regarding treatment of acute pain...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Benjamin A Willenbring, Callie K Schnitker, Samuel J Stellpflug
BACKGROUND: Esophageal food impaction is a common illness presenting to emergency departments (ED), and is frequently resistant to pharmacologic therapy. Several medications have been promoted for this indication, but so far have not proven effective. Endoscopic removal is frequently required to resolve the impaction, resulting in risks from anesthesia and the physical procedure, and in prolonged hospital stay for recovery. Oral nitroglycerin solution was recently used in two such cases and may represent a new therapeutic option...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Andrew C Faust, Emily Guy, Nidhu Baby, Anthony Ortegon
BACKGROUND: Methemoglobinemia is a well-recognized adverse drug reaction related to the use of certain local anesthetic agents. The mainstay of treatment for methemoglobinemia is i.v. methylene blue, along with provision of supplemental oxygen; however, methylene blue is listed as a category X teratogen. This poses an issue should methemoglobinemia develop during pregnancy. CASE REPORT: A 35-year-old, 20-week and 5-day gravid female was transferred from an outpatient oral surgeon's office for hypoxia...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Rachael Scott, Brian Kersten, Jeanne Basior, Megan Nadler
BACKGROUND: Different strategies exist for dosing four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC4) for international normalized ratio (INR) reversal in the setting of life-threatening bleeding. Fixed doses ranging from 1000 IU to 1750 IU have demonstrated efficacy similar to weight-based dosing, however, few studies look exclusively at intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to evaluate whether a fixed dose of 1000 IU of PCC4 achieves INR reversal similar to weight-based dosing in patients with ICH who were anticoagulated with warfarin...
March 3, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
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