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Clinics in Dermatology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916031/dermatosis-papulosa-nigra-a-clinically-and-histopathologically-distinct-entity
#1
Simon Arda Metin, Brian W Lee, William Clark Lambert, Lawrence Charles Parish
Dermatosis papulosa nigra was first described by Aldo Castellani (1874-1971) more than 90 years ago, and it has since been presumed to be a variant of seborrheic keratosis. Despite their morphologic similarities both macroscopically and microscopically, key differences have yet to be explained. These lesions also exhibit different demographics, with dermatosis papulosa nigra having a predilection for dark-skinned individuals and a female predominance. No studies to date have investigated this, but studies assessing the mechanisms of similar dermatologic conditions may yield significant clues...
September 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916030/fellowship-candidate-selection-at-the-best-medical-center-a-novel-process
#2
Philip R Cohen
Dr. Ida Lystic completed her MD degree at the prestigious Harvey Medical School (which has since been renamed the Harvey Provider School) and her residency in internal medicine and gastroenterology fellowship at the OTHER (Owen T. Henry and Eugene Rutherford) Medical Center. She was subsequently hired as an assistant professor at the BEST (Byron Edwards and Samuel Thompson) Medical Center in 2015. After eventually completing an extensive list of employment requirements, she was able to begin seeing patients...
September 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916029/oral-mucosa-biology-and-salivary-biomarkers
#3
Rosie Qin, Andrea Steel, Nasim Fazel
Although the surfaces of both the skin and oral mucosa are protected by squamous epithelial cells and fall within the scope of dermatologic practice, the oral cavity contains highly specialized structures and functions distinct from other skin biology and pathologic conditions and are also the purview of clinicians who care for patients with skin and mucosal diseases. We describe the distinct features of the tongue, mucosa, and salivary glands. In particular, we examine the composition and function of the saliva, with special focus on salivary biomarkers...
September 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916028/etiology-evaluation-and-management-of-xerostomia
#4
Jillian W Millsop, Elizabeth A Wang, Nasim Fazel
Xerostomia is defined as the complaint of oral dryness. It is a condition that primarily affects older adults and can have a significant negative effect on one's quality of life. Patients with xerostomia often do not have objective signs of hyposalivation. The underlying etiology of xerostomia includes a variety of systemic diseases and local factors. Our aim is to provide a comprehensive review of the differential diagnosis, evaluation, and management of xerostomia. Prompt diagnosis and management can alleviate the clinical manifestations of this debilitating condition...
September 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916027/oral-leukoplakia-and-oral-cavity-squamous-cell-carcinoma
#5
Arnaud F Bewley, D Gregory Farwell
Oral leukoplakia is defined as a white oral lesion not related to another disease process. These lesions are largely asymptomatic, and the clinical relevance of oral leukoplakia is primarily tied to its association with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Timely workup and effective management of these lesions can reduce the risk of malignant transformation and promote early diagnosis of invasive tumors. A biopsy should be performed promptly of any persistent or suspicious leukoplakia with subsequent management dictated by histologic findings...
September 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916026/a-diagnostic-and-therapeutic-approach-to-primary-burning-mouth-syndrome
#6
Siamak Moghadam-Kia, Nasim Fazel
Primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is an oral mucosal disorder that is characterized by a chronic and often debilitating intraoral burning sensation for which no localized or systemic cause can be found. BMS most commonly affects postmenopausal women. The pathophysiology of primary BMS is not well understood. Diagnosing BMS can prove to be challenging. BMS patients can also pose a therapeutic challenge to clinicians who are consulted to evaluate these patients. Most commonly used therapies include tricyclic antidepressants, α-lipoic acid, clonazepam, and cognitive-behavioral therapy...
September 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916025/oral-manifestations-of-nutritional-disorders
#7
Stanislav N Tolkachjov, Alison J Bruce
Nutritional deficiencies occur when body metabolic requirements are not matched by intake and absorption. Reasons for this discrepancy are numerous, but often social, economic, medical, and even psychiatric factors may play a role. Vitamins and minerals are required for appropriate rapid cell turnover of the oral mucosa. The oral cavity is a unique anatomic environment that may manifest early signs of nutritional disorders as well as other indicators of systemic disease. Knowledge of these oral manifestations and associated findings will allow a practitioner to consider a nutritional disorder when evaluating oral changes and, in turn, initiate appropriate therapy...
September 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916024/contact-stomatitis
#8
Mirtha Cifuentes, Parastoo Davari, Roy S Rogers
Contact stomatitis occurs in up to 10% of the population. Mechanical or chemical irritation, ill-fitting dentures, and dental fillings can induce irritant contact stomatitis. Type I hypersensitivity and type IV hypersensitivity to dental products and foods are frequently responsible for the allergic types of contact stomatitis. We review the causal agents of contact stomatitis, the differential diagnoses, diagnostic testing, and potential treatment.
September 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916023/beh%C3%A3-et-disease-new-aspects
#9
Isil Bulur, Meltem Onder
Behçet disease is currently considered an "autoinflammatory disease" triggered by infection and environmental factors in genetically predisposed individuals. Although the disease is characterized by recurrent oral and genital aphthous ulcers and ocular involvement, it can affect multiple organ systems. Complex aphthosis is characterized by recurrent oral and/or genital aphthous ulcers. It is important to evaluate the patient with complex aphthosis for Behçet disease and related systemic disorders. We discuss the etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnostic criteria, and treatment approaches for complex aphthosis and Behçet disease in light of the current literature...
September 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916022/oral-dermatology-part-ii
#10
EDITORIAL
Roy S Rogers, Nasim Fazel
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709573/-wolf-s-isotopic-response-the-originators-speak-their-mind-and-set-the-record-straight
#11
Ronni Wolf, Danny Wolf
Having been the first to have introduced the concept of "isotopic response" three decades ago, we wanted to express some of our thoughts on its current application, now that more than 100 such cases have been reported in the literature. It is, of course, gratifying to read about its appropriate application, and it is our hope that others will refrain from distorting its original meaning.
July 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709572/the-balancing-act-of-societies-and-of-clinical-histories
#12
Mauricio Goihman-Yahr
Individuals and societies are, respectively, confederations of cells and individuals. They function well only if their constituents work in a complementary and harmonious way. This is regulated by control mechanisms. Failure or malfunction of these leads to disease or social upheaval, respectively. Medicine, including dermatology, and government act by restoring homeostasis when self-regulation is unable to do so. Long-term or even permanent survival of individuals and societies can be achieved when profound understanding of control mechanisms becomes a reality...
July 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709571/timing-of-food-introduction-and-atopy-prevention
#13
Malika Gupta, Scott H Sicherer
The apparent increase in atopic disease, particularly food allergy, over the past 2 decades has resulted in reconsideration of prevention strategies aimed at the infant's diet. Early advice to have atopy-prone infants delay ingestion of potential food allergens, such as egg, cow's milk, and peanut, was rescinded, as new evidence emerged that did not support these approaches. More recently, randomized controlled trials have provided data to support an opposite strategy, promoting early ingestion of allergens as a means of food allergy prevention...
July 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709570/systemic-therapies-in-atopic-dermatitis-the-pipeline
#14
Yael Renert-Yuval, Emma Guttman-Yassky
Atopic dermatitis (AD), the most prevalent inflammatory skin disease, is characterized by robust T-cell activation. The disease has several subtypes, all having a common T helper type 2 (Th2)/Th22 polarization, but it also displays differential immune skewing, such as increased Th17/interleukin 23 skewing in the skin of intrinsic, Asian, and early pediatric AD patients. Current systemic treatments for moderate to severe AD are largely unsatisfactory, associated with significant adverse effects and low compliance...
July 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709569/selected-active-naturals-for-atopic-dermatitis-atopic-dermatitis-part-1
#15
Nanette B Silverberg
The desire for naturally derived agents is a growing trend for patients, physicians, and pharmaceutical companies. Studies indicate that complementary and alternative medicine is often used by patients and parents of children with atopic dermatitis, not necessarily with beneficial results. A half-dozen natural agents (ie, topical agents: coconut oil, colloidal oatmeal, sunflower oil, mustard oil, glycerin, and oral Chinese herbal therapy) are discussed because they have become popular for their expected activity in the therapy of atopic dermatitis...
July 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709568/current-and-emerging-topical-therapies-for-atopic-dermatitis
#16
Jeremy Udkoff, Andrea Waldman, Jusleen Ahluwalia, Jenna Borok, Lawrence F Eichenfield
The pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) involves epidermal barrier dysfunction and T helper cell type 2 (Th2) lymphocyte-driven inflammation. Cytokines, such as interleukin 4 (IL-4) and IL-13, are important in this reaction. They stimulate B cells to produce immunoglobulin E, causing atopic disease. This process has been well characterized, and new therapies for AD, such as phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE-4) inhibitors, Th2-expressed chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule antagonists, and Janus kinase inhibitors, work by antagonizing this cellular pathway...
July 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709567/contact-dermatitis-considerations-in-atopic-dermatitis
#17
REVIEW
Chandler W Rundle, Daniel Bergman, Alina Goldenberg, Sharon E Jacob
Complex immunologic pathways, influenced by both genetic and environment triggers, contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Suppressing mechanisms between the Th1-driven allergic contact dermatitis and the Th2-driven atopic dermatitis conditions were thought to reduce the simultaneous expression of both; however, recent evidence indicates that pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis are likely to develop clinically relevant positive patch tests and more likely to react to specific allergens, such as lanolin...
July 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709566/selected-comorbidities-of-atopic-dermatitis-atopy-neuropsychiatric-and-musculoskeletal-disorders
#18
Jonathan I Silverberg
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic pruritic inflammatory skin disease with substantial morbidity and quality of life impairment. There are a number of comorbid health problems that occur in patients with AD, aside from the cutaneous signs and symptoms. Chronic pruritus and inflammation can lead to sleep disturbances and mental health symptoms, which are not mutually exclusive. AD is associated with and may predispose to higher risk of other atopic disorders, including asthma and hay fever. Persons with AD appear to be at higher risk for multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, speech disorders in childhood, headaches, and seizures...
July 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709565/typical-and-atypical-clinical-appearance-of-atopic-dermatitis
#19
Nanette B Silverberg
Atopic dermatitis is a complex, systemic inflammatory disorder associated with a variety of clinical features. The original criteria of Hanifin and Rajka include major criteria and a list of about two dozen minor criteria however, even the minor criteria do not include some features of atopic dermatitis noted less commonly but still seen with some frequency. This contribution first reviews the common clinical appearance of atopic dermatitis in infancy, childhood, and adulthood, as well as the less typical appearances, including lichenoid atopic dermatitis; juvenile plantar dermatosis; nummular-type atopic dermatitis; follicular atopic dermatitis; alopecia of atopic dermatitis; eczema coxsackium; and psoriasiform, perineal, and lip licker's dermatitis...
July 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709564/current-and-emerging-concepts-in-atopic-dermatitis-pathogenesis
#20
Marguerite Sullivan, Nanette B Silverberg
Atopic dermatitis is a common skin disorder with a complex, evolving pathogenesis. Research on the pathogenesis has shifted from focusing primarily on generalized immune system abnormalities in T helper 1/T helper 2 (Th1/Th2) activity to more targeted immune and skin barrier abnormalities contributing to the overall phenotype. Specific signaling pathways recently implicated in atopic dermatitis include production of interleukin (IL) 4 and IL-13, which promote immunoglobulin E production, Th17 and Th22 cells, and production of cytokines...
July 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
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