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Clinics in Dermatology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511834/an-assault-to-the-national-academies-of-venezuela
#1
LETTER
Mauricio Goihman-Yahr
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511833/isotretinoin-in-retrospect
#2
Ayse Serap Karadag, Lawrence Charles Parish, Wm Clark Lambert
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511832/impact-factor-universalism-and-reliability-of-assessment
#3
Andrzej Grzybowski, Rafał Patryn
In 1955, Eugene Garfield (1925-1917) published a paper in Science where for the first time he advocated the necessity of introducing parameters to assess the quality of scientific journals. Underlying this necessity was an observation of a trend where the whole area of influence in academic publishing was dominated by a narrow group of large interdisciplinary research journals. For this reason, along with Irving H. Sher, they created the impact factor (IF), also called the Garfield impact factor, journal citation rate, journal influence, and journal impact factor...
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511831/obstructive-sleep-apnea-and-dermatologic-disorders
#4
Madhulika A Gupta, Fiona C Simpson, Branka Vujcic, Aditya K Gupta
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is present in at least 2% of women and 4% of men, and its prevalence is increasing, because a major predisposing factor for OSA is a high body mass index. Psoriasis has the most strongly substantiated link with OSA, where the relationship may be bidirectional. Dermatologic disorders may be comorbid with OSA due to several factors: (i) the heightened proinflammatory state in OSA, which can occur independent of body mass index, and may exacerbate inflammatory dermatoses; (ii) intermittent hypoxemia may promote neovascularization and tumor growth in certain cancers, such as melanoma; (iii) obesity, present in majority of OSA patients, can be associated with a heightened proinflammatory state; (iv) upper airway obstruction due to local tumors or soft tissue swelling due to physical urticaria or angioedema; (v) acute nasal congestion in the atopic patient with allergic rhinitis; (vi) dermatologic disorders associated with other OSA risk factors (eg, acanthosis nigricans and metabolic syndrome); and (vii) a high sympathetic tone (eg, in atopic dermatitis) and resultant sleep fragmentation contributing to upper airway instability during sleep...
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511830/personality-disorders-and-the-difficult-dermatology-patient-maximizing-patient-satisfaction
#5
Mio Nakamura, John Koo
Personality disorders (PDs) are stable and enduring patterns of thought, feeling, and behavior that deviate from one's cultural norms and cause impairment in functionality. Patients with PDs are commonly encountered in the dermatologic setting and can be perceived by providers as "difficult." Given that PDs are chronic, rigid, and frustrating to deal with, it is important to be skillful in the approach to such patients, especially in the era of the value-based reimbursement system, in which patient satisfaction is crucial for reimbursement...
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511829/suicidal-behaviors-in-the-dermatology-patient
#6
Madhulika A Gupta, Daiana R Pur, Branka Vujcic, Aditya K Gupta
An assessment of suicidal behaviors in the dermatology patient may be necessary in several situations: (1) in the presence of psychiatric comorbidity (major depressive disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, substance use disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder), encountered in up to 30% of dermatology patients; (2) when dermatologic symptoms ("dysmorphophobia," dermatitis artefacta) represent psychiatric pathologic conditions; (3) when psychosocial stressors (bereavement, interpersonal violence) increase the risk of suicidal behavior and exacerbate stress-reactive dermatoses (psoriasis, acne); (4) in the presence of high disease burden (chronicity, increased disease severity); (5) in instances of significant pruritus or chronic sleep disruption; (6) in the presence of facial lesions or facial scarring; (7) when social exclusion or feelings of alienation arise secondary to the skin disorder; (8) with use of medications (retinoids, biologics) for which suicidal behavior has been implicated as a possible side effect; and (9) when treating psychiatric patients experiencing a serious reaction to psychotropic medications (eg, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and anticonvulsants)...
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511828/body-dysmorphic-disorder-in-the-dermatology-patient
#7
Caroline S Koblenzer
Body dysmorphic disorder is primarily a psychiatric disorder, in which the patient believes that some normal or very near normal aspect of his or her physical appearance is distorted or ugly. Should there be a minor abnormality, it is grossly exaggerated in the mind of the patient, causing feelings of shame and embarrassment and leading daily to spending hours at the mirror, or any reflecting surface, as the patient tries to conceal or remove the perceived abnormality through the development of ritualistic behavior...
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511827/psychosomatic-aspects-of-vitiligo
#8
Felipe Cupertino, João Paulo Niemeyer-Corbellini, Marcia Ramos-E-Silva
Vitiligo is a chronic common skin disease. The asymptomatic hypopigmented cutaneous lesions are considered by many health care professionals as a cosmetic problem only; however, vitiligo can have a major psychosocial impact on patients' lives. We review some of the factors responsible for this impact, such as the general public's wrong perception of the disease, feelings and emotional responses from patients, how stressful events can act as triggers of the disease, stigmatization experiences suffered by the patients, the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity, the effects on relationships and sex life, how quality of life in adults and children is impaired, and how treatment can improve it...
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511826/use-of-hypnosis-meditation-and-biofeedback-in-dermatology
#9
Philip D Shenefelt
Hypnosis utilizes trance to access otherwise inaccessible repressed or unconscious memories and features of the psyche and control of physiology not attainable in the ordinary conscious waking state. Medical uses of hypnosis in dermatology include reducing discomfort from itching or skin pain, altering ingrained dysfunctional habits such as scratching, promoting healing of skin disorders, searching for psychosomatic aspects of skin disorders and alleviating them, and reframing cognitive and emotional dysfunctional patterns related to skin disorders...
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511825/neuropsychiatric-factors-in-sensitive-skin
#10
Laurent Misery
Sensitive skin is a syndrome defined by the occurrence of unpleasant sensations (stinging, burning, pain, pruritus, and tingling sensations) in response to stimuli that normally should not provoke such sensations. The worldwide prevalence of sensitive skin is approximately 40%. Clinical, histologic, biochemical, and therapeutic data show that this condition is related to changes in epidermal nerve endings with subsequent hyperreactivity and neurogenic inflammation; hence, sensitive skin is not a psychosomatic disorder, although psychologic consequences are possible...
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511824/psychiatric-disorders-and-pruritus
#11
Helen Gin Lee, Carolyn Stull, Gil Yosipovitch
The skin and psyche are intimately related with various skin diseases caused by or resulting in psychiatric disturbances. Pruritus is a commonly reported symptom in psychiatric patients, and likewise psychiatric co-morbidities, including anxiety and depression, are frequently seen in chronic pruritus patients. Primary psychodermatologic conditions, such as somatic symptom disorder, dermatitis artefacta, obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (excoriation disorder and prurigo nodularis), delusional infestation, and substance use disorder, can all induce significant pruritus in patients, severely affecting their quality of life...
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511823/dissociation-and-conversion-symptoms-in-dermatology
#12
Madhulika A Gupta, Branka Vujcic, Aditya K Gupta
Dissociation and conversion (defined as the somatic component of dissociation) can play an important mediating role in the exacerbation of the stress-reactive dermatoses (eg, psoriasis, idiopathic urticaria, atopic dermatitis), dermatoses that are exacerbated by excessive scratching (eg, lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis) and koebnerization, and the self-induced dermatoses (dermatitis artefacta, acne excoriée, skin picking disorder, trichotillomania, onychotillomania/onychophagia). Dissociative symptoms often coexist with obsessive-compulsive symptoms in the more severe cases of the self-induced dermatoses...
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511822/posttraumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd-and-the-dermatology-patient
#13
Madhulika A Gupta, Patricia Jarosz, Aditya K Gupta
Dermatologic symptoms can be associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in several situations: (1) as features of some core PTSD symptoms, such as intrusion symptoms manifesting as cutaneous sensory flashbacks, as autonomic arousal manifesting as night sweats and idiopathic urticaria, and as dissociation manifesting as numbness and dermatitis artefacta; (2) the cutaneous psychosomatic effects of emotional and physical neglect and sexual abuse (eg, infantile eczema, cutaneous self-injury, and body-focused repetitive behaviors such as trichotillomania and skin picking disorder) and eating disorders, which can have dermatologic effects; (3) the direct effect of physical or sexual abuse or catastrophic life events (eg, earthquakes) on the skin; and (4) as a result of significant alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and sympatho-adrenal medullary axes, which can affect neuroendocrine and immune functions, and can lead to exacerbations of stress-reactive inflammatory dermatoses such as psoriasis, chronic urticaria, and atopic dermatitis...
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511821/somatization-in-the-dermatology-patient-some-sociocultural-perspectives
#14
Krishna M Prasad, Geetha Desai, Santosh K Chaturvedi
Somatization in dermatology patients is a challenge to diagnose and manage. Somatization presents as medically unexplained dermatologic symptoms, which are commonly encountered in dermatology and psychiatry practices. These cutaneous symptoms are often intriguing and do not fit into any particular known dermatologic condition. Sometimes, they may evoke negative feelings in the practicing dermatologist. The dermatologic somatic symptoms might be one way of communicating psychologic distress in a culturally acceptable method...
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511820/somatic-symptom-disorder-in-dermatology
#15
James L Levenson, Aditi A Sharma, Alex G Ortega-Loayza
Somatic symptom disorder (SSD) is defined by the prominence of somatic symptoms associated with abnormal thoughts, feelings, and behaviors related to the symptoms, resulting in significant distress and impairment. Individuals with these disorders are more commonly encountered in primary care and other medical settings, including dermatology practice, than in psychiatric and other mental health settings. What defines the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors as abnormal is that they are excessive, that is, out of proportion to other patients with similar somatic symptoms, and that they result in significant distress and impairment...
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511819/psychiatric-dermatology-revisited
#16
EDITORIAL
Madhulika A Gupta
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28274366/pemphigus-vulgaris-and-pemphigus-foliaceus-determined-by-cd86-and-ctla4-polymorphisms
#17
Srdjan Tanasilovic, Svetlana Popadic, Ljiljana Medenica, Dusan Popadic
Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus (PF) are rare autoimmune blistering diseases with presumed T-cell-dependent pathology. Activation of naïve T cells is dependent on antigen recognition, subsequent signaling through the T-cell receptor complex (signal 1), and various other interactions of T cells with antigen presenting cells that may be collectively designated as signal 2, which is unconditionally required for T-cell activation both in response to infection and to autoantigens. Among the best described interactions contributing to signal 2 are those mediated by B7 family molecules, such as CD80 and CD86 with their ligands; CD28, providing activation signals; and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), conferring inhibition...
March 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28274365/eleventh-world-congress-of-the-international-academy-of-cosmetic-dermatology-panama-city-panama-june-23-25-2016
#18
Vesna Petronic-Rosic
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28274364/squamous-cell-carcinoma-arising-in-long-standing-hidradenitis-suppurativa-an-overlooked-facet-of-the-immunocompromised-district
#19
Gabriella Fabbrocini, Eleonora Ruocco, Valerio De Vita, Giuseppe Monfrecola
The list of comorbidities and complications associated with hidradenitis suppurativa is extensive. Among the complications of hidradenitis suppurativa, squamous cell carcinoma is considered the most severe. After a meticulous literature research starting from the 1950s, we were able to identify over 90 cases of patients with hidradenitis suppurativa developing squamous cell carcinoma. Most squamous cell carcinomas appear on the perineal or buttock areas. We believe that the development of squamous cell carcinoma in longstanding hidradenitis suppurativa is a typical condition of an immunocompromised district...
March 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28274363/treatments-for-hidradenitis-suppurativa
#20
R Kjærsgaard Andersen, Gregor B E Jemec
Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is not easily treated. Although not uncommon, HS is often misdiagnosed outside specialized clinics and inappropriately treated as a simple boil or abscess. In recent years, guidelines have been developed on the basis of expert opinion and the available literature. A multifaceted approach is necessary as HS lesions include both inflammation (amenable to medical treatment) as well as fibrosis (amenable to surgery only). The recommended antiinflammatory therapies encompass both antimicrobials and regular anti-inflammatory drugs...
March 2017: Clinics in Dermatology
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