Read by QxMD icon Read

International Journal of Psychophysiology

Alissa B Forman-Alberti, J Benjamin Hinnant
The somatic marker hypothesis posits that autonomic activity occurring in response to specific stimuli aids in implicit learning, the learning of information without explicit awareness of what has been learned. This study investigated whether respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a measure of autonomic nervous system activity, predicted changes in implicit learning. The interaction of resting RSA and RSA reactivity (change in RSA during the implicit learning task) was associated with changes in implicit learning, with those who had higher resting RSA and greater RSA withdrawal during the task performing better...
October 18, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Muhammad Abid Azam, Joel Katz, Vina Mohabir, Paul Ritvo
BACKGROUND: Current research suggests that associations between headache conditions (migraine, tension) and imbalances in the autonomic nervous system (ANS) are due to stress-related dysregulation in the activity of the parasympathetic-sympathetic branches. Mindfulness meditation has demonstrated effectiveness in reducing pain-related distress, and in enhancing heart rate variability-a vagal-mediated marker of ANS balance. This study examined HRV during cognitive stress and mindfulness meditation in individuals with migraine and tension headaches...
October 18, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Peter E Clayson, Gregory A Miller
Generalizability theory (G theory) provides a flexible, multifaceted approach to estimating score reliability. G theory's approach to estimating score reliability has important advantages over classical test theory that are relevant for research using event-related brain potentials (ERPs). For example, G theory does not require parallel forms (i.e., equal means, variances, and covariances), can handle unbalanced designs, and provides a single reliability estimate for designs with multiple sources of error. This monograph provides a detailed description of the conceptual framework of G theory using examples relevant to ERP researchers, presents the algorithms needed to estimate ERP score reliability, and provides a detailed walkthrough of newly-developed software, the ERP Reliability Analysis (ERA) Toolbox, that calculates score reliability using G theory...
October 18, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Dahan Anat, Reiner Miriam
The extensive use of gestures for human-human communication, independently of culture and language, suggests an underlying universal neural mechanism for gesture recognition. The mirror neuron system (MNS) is known to respond to observed human actions, and overlaps with self-action. The minimal cues needed for activation of the MNS for gesture recognition, facial expressions and bodily dynamics, is not yet defined. Using LED-point representations of gestures, we compared two types of brain activations: 1) in response to human recognizable vs non-recognizable motion and 2) in response to human vs non-human motion...
October 15, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Gáspár Lukács, Béla Weiss, Vera Dalos, Tünde Kilencz, Szabina Tudja, Gábor Csifcsák
More than a dozen studies of the Complex Trial Protocol (CTP) version of the P300-based Concealed Information Test have been published since its introduction (Rosenfeld et al., 2008), and it has been fairly consistently proven to provide high accuracy and strong resistance to countermeasures (Rosenfeld et al., 2013). However, no independent authors have verified these findings until now. In the present, first independent study, we corroborate the accuracy and countermeasure-resistance of the CTP, when the probe item (critical presented information, e...
October 14, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Youssef Shiban, Julia Dieme, Simone Brandl, Rebecca Zack, Andreas Mühlberger, Stefan Wüst
The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) is considered a reliable paradigm for inducing psychosocial stress. Virtual reality (VR) has successfully been applied to ensure a greater degree of efficiency and standardization in the TSST. Studies using the TSST in VR (VR-TSST) have reported significant stress reactions, with subjective and peripheral physiological reactions comparable to those in response to the in vivo TSST and with lower cortisol reactions. The current study examined whether an additional virtual competitive factor triggers larger stress responses than a standard VR-TSST...
October 11, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Mithras Kuipers, Michael Richter, Daan Scheepers, Maarten A Immink, Elio Sjak-Shie, Henk van Steenbergen
The ability to adjust attentional focus to varying levels of task demands depends on the adaptive recruitment of cognitive control processes. The present study investigated for the first time whether the mobilization of cognitive control during response-conflict trials in a flanker task is associated with effort-related sympathetic activity as measured by changes in the RZ-interval at a single-trial level, thus providing an alternative to the pre-ejection period (PEP) which can only be reliably measured in ensemble-averaged data...
October 10, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Marlies E van Bochove, Eva Ketel, Miles Wischnewski, Joost Wegman, Esther Aarts, Benjamin de Jonge, W Pieter Medendorp, Dennis J L G Schutter
Research on the hedonic value of food has been important in understanding the motivational and emotional correlates of normal and abnormal eating behaviour. The aim of the present study was to explore associations between hemispheric asymmetries recorded during resting state electroencephalography (EEG) and hedonic valuation of food. Healthy adult volunteers were recruited and four minutes of resting state EEG were recorded from the scalp. Hedonic food valuation and reward sensitivity were assessed with the hedonic attitude to food and behavioural activation scale...
October 8, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Wangbing Shen, Yuan Yuan, Chang Liu, Xiaojiang Zhang, Jing Luo, Zhe Gong
The question of whether creative insight varies across problem types has recently come to the forefront of studies of creative cognition. In the present study, to address the nature of creative insight, the coordinate-based activation likelihood estimation (ALE) technique was utilized to individually conduct three quantitative meta-analyses of neuroimaging experiments that used the compound remote associate (CRA) task, the prototype heuristic (PH) task and the Chinese character chunk decomposition (CCD) task...
October 6, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Patrick Gomez, Armin von Gunten, Brigitta Danuser
In the present study, we examined how sex and age shape cardiovascular, electrodermal, and pupillary reactivity to picture series within the valence-arousal affective space in a sample of 176 healthy younger, middle-aged, and older men and women. Across participants, heart rate (HR) decelerated with increasing self-reported unpleasantness, whereas skin conductance level (SCL) and pupil size (PS) increased with increasing self-rated arousal. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure increased with increasing self-rated arousal when valence was pleasant but much less when valence was unpleasant...
October 6, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Adrian Garcia-Sierra, Nairan Ramírez-Esparza, Patricia K Kuhl
The present investigation explored the relation between the amount of language input and neural responses in English monolingual (N=18) and Spanish-English bilingual (N=19) infants. We examined the mismatch negativity (MMN); both the positive mismatch response (pMMR) and the negative mismatch response (nMMR), and identify a relationship between amount of language input and brain measures of speech discrimination for native and non-native speech sounds (i.e., Spanish, English and Chinese). Brain responses differed as a function of language input for native speech sounds in both monolinguals and bilinguals...
October 6, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Zvi Liza, Elaad Eitan
The contribution of the Big-Five personality dimensions and locus of control to examinees' physiological responses in the Concealed Information polygraph Test (CIT) was examined for the first time. One hundred and twenty undergraduate students who completed Big Five personality and locus of control questionnaires were instructed to commit a mock theft. They were subsequently tested in the Guilty Actions polygraph Test, a modified version of the CIT. Each of the six sets of items (questions) was repeated twice...
October 5, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Thomas Forkmann, Anne Scherer, Judith Meessen, Matthias Michal, Hartmut Schächinger, Claus Vögele, André Schulz
Garfinkel and Critchley (2013) recently proposed a three level model of interoception. Only few studies, however, have empirically tested this theoretical model thus far. The present study aimed at investigating (1) the central assumptions of this model, i.e. that Accuracy, Sensibility and Awareness are distinguishable facets of interoception and that Interoceptive Accuracy is the basic level of interoception, and (2) whether cardiovascular activation (as indexed by heart rate) is differentially related to the three facets of interoception...
October 1, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Dylan DeLosAngeles, Graham Williams, John Burston, Sean P Fitzgibbon, Trent W Lewis, Tyler S Grummett, C Richard Clark, Kenneth J Pope, John O Willoughby
Meditative techniques aim for and meditators report states of mental alertness and focus, concurrent with physical and emotional calm. We aimed to determine the electroencephalographic (EEG) correlates of five states of Buddhist concentrative meditation, particularly addressing a correlation with meditative level. We studied 12 meditators and 12 pair-matched meditation-naïve participants using high-resolution scalp-recorded EEG. To maximise reduction of EMG, data were pre-processed using independent component analysis and surface Laplacian transformed data...
October 1, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Damee Choi, Takahiro Sekiya, Natsumi Minote, Shigeki Watanuki
Previous studies have shown that reappraisal (changing the way that one thinks about emotional events) is an effective strategy for regulating emotion, compared with suppression (reducing emotion-expressive behavior). In the present study, we investigated relative left frontal activity when participants were instructed to use reappraisal and suppression of negative emotion, by measuring frontal alpha asymmetry (FAA). Two electroencephalography (EEG) experiments were conducted; FAA was analyzed while 102 healthy participants (59 men, 43 women) watched negative images after being instructed to perform reappraisal (Experiment 1) and suppression (Experiment 2)...
September 29, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Britta Biedermann, Peter de Lissa, Yatin Mahajan, Vince Polito, Nicolas Badcock, Michael H Connors, Lena Quinto, Linda Larsen, Genevieve McArthur
The findings of a study by Cahn and Polich (2009) suggests that there is an effect of a meditative state on three event-related potential (ERP) brain markers of "low-level" auditory attention (i.e., acoustic representations in sensory memory) in expert meditators: the N1, the P2, and the P3a. The current study built on these findings by examining trait and state effects of meditation on the passive auditory mismatch negativity (MMN), N1, and P2 ERPs. We found that the MMN was significantly larger in meditators than non-meditators regardless of whether they were meditating or not (a trait effect), and that N1 amplitude was significantly attenuated during meditation in non-meditators but not expert meditators (an interaction between trait and state)...
September 28, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Guang Ouyang, Werner Sommer, Changsong Zhou
Stimulus-locked averaged event-related potentials (ERPs) are among the most frequently used signals in Cognitive Neuroscience. However, the late, cognitive or endogenous ERP components are often variable in latency from trial to trial in a component-specific way, compromising the stability assumption underlying the averaging scheme. Here we show that trial-to-trial latency variability of ERP components not only blurs the average ERP waveforms, but may also attenuate existing or artificially induce condition effects in amplitude...
September 28, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Takahiro Osumi, Hideki Ohira
Previous studies have investigated which biological markers predict the decision to reject unfair monetary offers, termed costly punishment, in the ultimatum game (UG). One study showed that a phasic deceleratory response in heart rate (HR) is evoked in the responder more readily by offers that will be rejected than by offers that will be accepted. However, owing to the paucity of supporting evidence, it remains unclear whether and why HR deceleration can predict the decisions of UG responders. In this paper, we report two separate studies (Study 1 and Study 2) using modified versions of the UG to explore factors modulating HR deceleration...
September 28, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Martin J Herrmann, Dorothea Neueder, Anna K Troeller, Stefan M Schulz
Emotional processing is probably the most crucial tool for orienting oneself in our everyday social life and has been considered to be highly automatic for a long time. Dual task (DT) research shows that information competing for working memory resources impairs the identification of emotional facial expressions. Effects of cognitive load in DT paradigms have been confirmed in numerous neuroimaging studies. However, interference occurring during a DT comprised of decoding emotional facial expressions and a visuo-spatial working memory task has yet to be visualized...
September 25, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Rocío A López Zunini, Frank Knoefel, Courtney Lord, Fiatsogbe Dzuali, Michael Breau, Lisa Sweet, Rafik Goubran, Vanessa Taler
Persons with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) can experience deficits in working memory. In the present study, we investigated working memory in persons with MCI and cognitively healthy older adults using event-related potentials (ERPs). Participants performed an n-back working memory task with baseline (0-back), low load (1-back), and high load (2-back) working memory conditions. MCI participants' performance was less accurate than that of healthy older adults in both the 1-back and 2-back conditions, and reaction times were longer in MCI than control participants in the 0-back, 1-back and 2-back conditions...
September 24, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"