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Seminars in Speech and Language

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324904/quantifying-neonatal-sucking-performance-promise-of-new-methods
#1
Gilson J Capilouto, Tommy J Cunningham, David R Mullineaux, Eleonora Tamilia, Christos Papadelis, Peter J Giannone
Neonatal feeding has been traditionally understudied so guidelines and evidence-based support for common feeding practices are limited. A major contributing factor to the paucity of evidence-based practice in this area has been the lack of simple-to-use, low-cost tools for monitoring sucking performance. We describe new methods for quantifying neonatal sucking performance that hold significant clinical and research promise. We present early results from an ongoing study investigating neonatal sucking as a marker of risk for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes...
April 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324903/instrumental-assessment-of-pediatric-dysphagia
#2
Joan C Arvedson, Maureen A Lefton-Greif
Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have fulfilled primary roles in the evaluation and management of children with feeding/swallowing disorders for more than five decades. The increased incidence and prevalence of newborns, infants, and children with feeding and swallowing disorders has resulted in increased use of instrumental swallowing evaluations. The videofluoroscopic swallow study and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing are the two most commonly used swallowing assessments by SLPs, with ultrasound used less frequently...
April 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324902/dysphagia-management-in-the-schools-past-present-and-future
#3
Cynthia R O'Donoghue, Elizabeth E Nottingham
As the number of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) responsible for swallowing and feeding services in the educational setting increases, guidance informing this specialized practice continues to emerge. Although SLPs have provided dysphagia management for children in medical settings for many years, the extension of dysphagia services to the schools is comparatively new. This shift in care delivery for what was previously a hospital-based practice is now occurring more frequently, and in an environment void of extensive medical supports (i...
April 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324901/pediatric-feeding-disorders-and-severe-developmental-disabilities
#4
Jane ORegan Kleinert
Children with severe developmental disabilities face numerous challenges to function and participate in activities of daily life. One of the most significant challenges to accomplishing this goal is that of oral feeding disorders. Indeed, it is estimated that among children with developmental disabilities, up to 80 to 90% present with some level of feeding disorders. In addition, it has been shown that as the level of severity of intellectual disability increases, so does the severity of the oral feeding disorders...
April 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324900/infant-guided-co-regulated-feeding-in-the-neonatal-intensive-care-unit-part-ii-interventions-to-promote-neuroprotection-and-safety
#5
Catherine S Shaker
Feeding skills of preterm neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit are in an emergent phase of development and require careful support to minimize stress. The underpinnings that influence and enhance both neuroprotection and safety were discussed in Part I. An infant-guided, co-regulated approach to feeding can protect the vulnerable neonate's neurologic development, support the parent-infant relationship, and prevent feeding problems that may endure. Contingent interventions are used to maintain subsystem stability and enhance self-regulation, development, and coping skills...
April 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324899/infant-guided-co-regulated-feeding-in-the-neonatal-intensive-care-unit-part-i-theoretical-underpinnings-for-neuroprotection-and-safety
#6
Catherine S Shaker
The rapid progress in medical and technical innovations in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has been accompanied by concern for outcomes of NICU graduates. Although advances in neonatal care have led to significant changes in survival rates of very small and extremely preterm neonates, early feeding difficulties with the transition from tube feeding to oral feeding are prominent and often persist beyond discharge to home. Progress in learning to feed in the NICU and continued growth in feeding skills after the NICU may be closely tied to fostering neuroprotection and safety...
April 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324898/breathing-and-swallowing-the-next-frontier
#7
Roxann Diez Gross, Marybeth Trapani-Hanasewych
The anatomical overlap of the pathways for air passage and nutrition necessitate precise coordination between the two vital functions. Neuroanatomic structures in the brainstem for sucking, breathing, and swallowing are also in close proximity and must swiftly coordinate the processes. In a healthy neonate, the oropharyngeal experience and stimulation of early feeding enables respiratory control during suckling to develop. Despite wide variability among the methods used to investigate breathing and swallowing coordination in infancy, a consistent finding of postswallow exhalation has been reported...
April 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324897/neonatal-feeding-behavior-as-a-complex-dynamical-system
#8
Eugene C Goldfield, Jennifer Perez, Katherine Engstler
The requirements of evidence-based practice in 2017 are motivating new theoretical foundations and methodological tools for characterizing neonatal feeding behavior. Toward that end, this article offers a complex dynamical systems perspective. A set of critical concepts from this perspective frames challenges faced by speech-language pathologists and allied professionals: when to initiate oral feeds, how to determine the robustness of neonatal breathing during feeding and appropriate levels of respiratory support, what instrumental assessments of swallow function to use with preterm neonates, and whether or not to introduce thickened liquids...
April 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324896/pediatric-dysphagia
#9
Gilson J Capilouto
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324895/the-importance-of-facts-and-the-role-of-academic-publishers-in-today-s-world-a-publisher-s-view
#10
Daniel Schiff
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28201838/phonological-treatment-approaches-for-spoken-word-production-in-aphasia
#11
Elizabeth Brookshire Madden, Reva M Robinson, Diane L Kendall
This article provides an overview of phonological treatment approaches for anomia in individuals with aphasia. The role of phonology in language processing, as well as the impact of phonological impairment on communication is initially discussed. Then, traditional phonologically based treatment approaches, including phonological, orthographic, indirect, guided, and mixed cueing methods, are described. Collectively, these cueing treatment approaches aim to facilitate word retrieval by stimulating residual phonological abilities...
February 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28201837/semantic-treatments-for-word-and-sentence-production-deficits-in-aphasia
#12
Mary Boyle
The cognitive domains of language and memory are intrinsically connected and work together during language processing. This relationship is especially apparent in the area of semantics. Several disciplines have contributed to a rich store of data about semantic organization and processing, and several semantic treatments for aphasic word and sentence production impairments have been based on these data. This article reviews the relationships between semantics and memory as they relate to word and sentence production, describes the aphasic language impairments that result from deficits in these areas, and summarizes treatment approaches that capitalize on what we have learned about these domains and how they work together...
February 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28201836/working-memory-in-aphasia-considering-discourse-processing-and-treatment-implications
#13
Amy Henderson, Hana Kim, Stephen Kintz, Nicole Frisco, Heather Harris Wright
Evidence suggests that persons with aphasia (PWAs) present with working memory impairments that affect a variety of language tasks. Most of these studies have focused on the phonological loop component of working memory and little attention has been paid to the episodic buffer component. The episodic buffer, as a limited capacity, multimodal system that binds and integrates information from the phonological loop, visuospatial sketchpad, and long-term memory would likely be involved in discourse processing. The purposes of this article were to (1) review discourse level deficits associated with aphasia, (2) describe how a deficit at the level of the episodic buffer could cause such deficits, (3) to review discourse treatment approaches for PWAs, and (4) present preliminary results from a novel discourse treatment study for PWAs...
February 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28201835/short-term-and-working-memory-treatments-for-improving-sentence-comprehension-in-aphasia-a-review-and-a-replication-study
#14
Christos Salis, Faustina Hwang, David Howard, Nicole Lallini
Although the roles of verbal short-term and working memory on spoken sentence comprehension skills in persons with aphasia have been debated for many years, the development of treatments to mitigate verbal short-term and working memory deficits as a way of improving spoken sentence comprehension is a new avenue in treatment research. In this article, we review and critically appraise this emerging evidence base. We also present new data from five persons with aphasia of a replication of a previously reported treatment that had resulted in some improvement of spoken sentence comprehension in a person with aphasia...
February 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28201834/short-term-memory-and-aphasia-from-theory-to-treatment
#15
Irene Minkina, Samantha Rosenberg, Michelene Kalinyak-Fliszar, Nadine Martin
This article reviews existing research on the interactions between verbal short-term memory and language processing impairments in aphasia. Theoretical models of short-term memory are reviewed, starting with a model assuming a separation between short-term memory and language, and progressing to models that view verbal short-term memory as a cognitive requirement of language processing. The review highlights a verbal short-term memory model derived from an interactive activation model of word retrieval. This model holds that verbal short-term memory encompasses the temporary activation of linguistic knowledge (e...
February 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28201833/language-specific-attention-treatment-for-aphasia-description-and-preliminary-findings
#16
Richard K Peach, Meghana R Nathan, Katherine M Beck
The need for a specific, language-based treatment approach to aphasic impairments associated with attentional deficits is well documented. We describe language-specific attention treatment, a specific skill-based approach for aphasia that exploits increasingly complex linguistic tasks that focus attention. The program consists of eight tasks, some with multiple phases, to assess and treat lexical and sentence processing. Validation results demonstrate that these tasks load on six attentional domains: (1) executive attention; (2) attentional switching; (3) visual selective attention/processing speed; (4) sustained attention; (5) auditory-verbal working memory; and (6) auditory processing speed...
February 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28201832/cognitive-approaches-to-aphasia-treatment-application-of-the-cognition-of-language-to-aphasia-intervention
#17
Richard K Peach
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28201831/next-generation-ssl
#18
Stacy A Wagovich, Heather Harris Wright, Alex F Johnson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27701707/children-with-specific-language-impairment-and-their-families-a-future-view-of-nature-plus-nurture-and-new-technologies-for-comprehensive-language-intervention-strategies
#19
Mabel L Rice
Future perspectives on children with language impairments are framed from what is known about children with specific language impairment (SLI). A summary of the current state of services is followed by discussion of how these children can be overlooked and misunderstood and consideration of why it is so hard for some children to acquire language when it is effortless for most children. Genetic influences are highlighted, with the suggestion that nature plus nurture should be considered in present as well as future intervention approaches...
November 2016: Seminars in Speech and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27701706/pediatric-feeding-swallowing-yesterday-today-and-tomorrow
#20
Maureen A Lefton-Greif, Joan C Arvedson
Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have played primary roles in the evaluation and management of children with feeding/swallowing disorders for more than five decades. Medical, surgical, and technological advances have improved the survival of young fragile infants and children, many of whom will present with feeding/swallowing problems. Regardless of their underlying etiologies, many of these children are at risk for aspiration-induced lung disease, undernutrition or malnutrition, developmental deficits, and stressful interactions with their caregivers...
November 2016: Seminars in Speech and Language
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