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Medical Anthropology Quarterly

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29665064/tourism-labor-embodied-suffering-and-the-deportation-regime-in-the-dominican-republic
#1
Mark Padilla, José Félix Colón-Burgos, Nelson Varas-Díaz, Armando Matiz-Reyes, Caroline Mary Parker
In this article, we use syndemic theory to examine socio-structural factors that result in heightened vulnerability to HIV infection and drug addiction among Dominican deportees who survive post-deportation through informal tourism labor. Through an ongoing NIDA-funded ethnographic study of the syndemic of HIV and problematic drug use among men involved in tourism labor in the Dominican Republic, we argue that the legal and political-economic context of the global deportation regime contributes to structural vulnerabilities among deportees in the Dominican Republic, most of whom are men with histories of incarceration in the United States and/or Puerto Rico...
April 17, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29572952/a-genealogy-of-animal-diseases-and-social-anthropology-1870-2000
#2
Frédéric Keck
Culling, vaccinating, and monitoring animals are the three main techniques used in contemporary veterinary public health to manage animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans. Each technique is underpinned by different ontological understandings of how microbes figure in relations between humans and animals. Therefore, animal diseases are not only a question for an applied anthropology but also involve the theoretical core of the discipline i.e., understanding how social causality emerges out of physical causality...
March 23, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29520829/cell-phones-%C3%A2-self-and-other-problems-with-big-data-detection-and-containment-during-epidemics
#3
Susan L Erikson
Evidence from Sierra Leone reveals the significant limitations of big data in disease detection and containment efforts. Early in the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic in West Africa, media heralded HealthMap's ability to detect the outbreak from newsfeeds. Later, big data-specifically, call detail record (CDR) data collected from millions of cell phones-was hyped as useful for stopping the disease by tracking contagious people. It did not work. In this article, I trace the causes of big data's containment failures...
March 8, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29392771/the-redistribution-of-reproductive-responsibility-on-the-epigenetics-of-environment-in-prenatal-interventions
#4
Natali Valdez
The rapidly shifting field of epigenetics has expanded scientific understanding of how environmental conditions affect gene expression and development. This article focuses on two ongoing clinical trials-one in the United States and one in the United Kingdom-that have used epigenetics as the conceptual basis for testing the relationship between nutrition and obesity during pregnancy. Drawing on ethnographic research, I highlight the different ways that clinical scientists interpret epigenetics to target particular domains of the environment for prenatal intervention...
February 1, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29380412/from-drug-safety-to-drug-security-a-contemporary-shift-in-the-policing-of-health
#5
Julia Hornberger
The counterfeiting of medication is increasingly seen as a major threat to health, especially in the light of both the everyday reliance on and a broadening of world-wide access to pharmaceuticals. Exaggerated or real, this threat has inaugurated, this article argues, a shift from a drug safety regime to a drug security regime that governs the flow of pharmaceuticals and brings together markets, police and health actors in new ways. This entails a shift from soft disciplinary means aimed at incremental and continued inclusion of defaulters, to one of drastically sovereign measures of exclusion and banishment aimed at fake goods and the people associated with them, in the name of health...
January 29, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29377315/the-data-hustle-how-beneficiaries-benefit-from-continual-data-collection-and-humanitarian-aid-research-in-the-somali-region-of-ethiopia
#6
Lauren Carruth
Based on ethnographic and policy research in the Somali Region of Ethiopia, this article examines how contemporary trends in the humanitarian relief industry to mandate continual data collection, "accountability," and the "localization" of aid have increased demands for participatory and intensive research methodologies in crisis-affected communities. International humanitarian relief agencies hustle to hire local staffs and recruit enough participants for their repeated research projects, while at the same time, the so-called beneficiaries of aid also hustle to participate in data collection as paid informants and temporary employees...
January 28, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29363780/kangaroo-mother-care-in-colombia-a-subaltern-health-innovation-against-for-profit-biomedicine
#7
César Ernesto Abadía-Barrero
This ethnographic study presents the origins, growth, and collapse of the first Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) program, a well-established practice for neonatal care created in 1978 in Colombia. The WHO and UNICEF praised this zero-cost revolutionary technique for its promotion of skin-to-skin contact between premature and low-birth-weight newborns and family members. KMC facilitates early hospital discharge, brings many clinical and psychological benefits, and constitutes an excellent alternative to placing babies in incubators...
January 24, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28791731/only-near-is-dear-doing-elderly-care-with-everyday-icts-in-indian-transnational-families
#8
Tanja Ahlin
In Kerala, South India, young people, especially women, are encouraged to become nurses in order to migrate abroad for work and thereby improve the financial status of their family. Meanwhile, many of their parents remain in India by themselves. This is occurring in the context of a strong popular discourse of elder abandonment, related to the local norms of intergenerational co-habitation. Based on fieldwork in Kerala and one of the nurses' destination countries, Oman, I present evidence that complicates this discourse by showing how: (1) migration is a form of elder care practice in itself; and (2) care for the elderly continues across countries and continents with the help of information and communication technologies (ICTs)...
March 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29356066/the-morality-of-disordered-eating-and-recovery-in-southern-italy
#9
Ann M Cheney, Steve Sullivan, Kathleen Grubbs
Scholars have traced the processes through which moral subjectivities are constituted in culturally meaningful ways through eating disorders and recovery practices, demonstrating how subjective meanings of eating disorders and recovery from them are imbued with moral undertones and become meaningful ways of existing within specific historical and cultural contexts. Drawing on ethnographic insights and interviews with young women with disordered eating histories in southern Italy, we show how suffering from eating disorders and recovery from them enables women to retool their identities and craft moral selves...
January 22, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29344977/there-is-no-place-like-home-imitation-and-the-politics-of-recognition-in-bolivian-obstetric-care
#10
Gabriela Elisa Morales
This article examines how efforts to "culturally adapt" birthing spaces in a rural Bolivian hospital are generating debates among doctors about what constitutes proper obstetric care. Working at the intersection of national and transnational projects, NGOs in Bolivia have remade the birthing rooms of some public health institutions to look more like a home, with the goal of making indigenous women feel more comfortable and encouraging them to come to the clinic to give birth. Yet narratives of transformation also obscure ongoing conditions of racial and gendered inequality in health services...
January 17, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28299834/guadalupan-devotion-as-a-moderator-of-psychosocial-stress-among-mexican-immigrants-in-the-rural-southern-united-states
#11
Mary Rebecca Read-Wahidi, Jason A DeCaro
This study considers how shared devotion to the Virgin of Guadalupe among Mexican immigrants in rural Mississippi buffers the effects of immigration stress. Rural destinations lacking social services can quickly compound the already stressful experience of immigration. Guadalupe devotion provides a way of coping with the daily life stressors of immigration. We test the hypothesis that high consonance in the cultural model of Guadalupan devotion will moderate the adverse health effects of immigration stress...
December 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28215053/-the-first-intervention-is-leaving-home-reasons-for-electing-an-out-of-hospital-birth-among-minnesotan-mothers
#12
Helen Hazen
The Twin Cities (Minneapolis-St. Paul), Minnesota, has seen a recent increase in the number of mothers seeking an out-of-hospital birth. This research uses in-depth interviews with 24 mothers who intended an out-of-hospital birth in the previous two years, exploring their reasons for pursuing an alternative approach to birth. For many women, an out-of-hospital birth fits within a philosophy that rejects the pathologizing of birth. Escaping rigid hospital protocols is seen as critical to avoiding what many mothers described as unnecessary interventions...
December 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025859/negotiations-of-blame-and-care-among-hiv-positive-mothers-and-daughters-in-south-africa-s-eastern-cape
#13
Beth Vale, Rebecca Hodes, Lucie Cluver
Research delineates two epidemiological categories among HIV-positive adolescents: those who contract the virus sexually and those who inherit it as infants. In this article, we are interested in how tacit inferences about adolescents' mode of infection contribute to their experiences of HIV-related blame, and their ability to achieve care, in their intimate, everyday settings. The analysis arises from ethnographic research with 23 HIV-positive adolescents living in South Africa's Eastern Cape. From these, we draw particularly on the narratives of four HIV-positive teenage girls and their HIV-positive mothers...
December 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025858/the-new-rich-and-their-unplanned-births-stratified-reproduction-under-china-s-birth-planning-policy
#14
Lihong Shi
This article explores the creation and ramifications of a stratified reproductive system under China's state control of reproduction. Within this system, an emerging group of "new rich" are able to circumvent birth regulations and have unplanned births because of their financial capabilities and social networks. While China's birth-planning policy is meant to be enforced equally for all couples, the unequal access to wealth and bureaucratic power as a result of China's widening social polarization has created disparate reproductive rights and experiences...
December 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27717006/commodifying-indigeneity-how-the-humanization-of-birth-reinforces-racialized-inequality-in-mexico
#15
Rosalynn Adeline Vega
This article examines the humanized birth movement in Mexico and analyzes how the remaking of tradition-the return to traditional birthing arts (home birth, midwife-assisted birth, natural birth)-inadvertently reinscribes racial hierarchies. The great irony of the humanized birth movement lies in parents' perspective of themselves as critics of late capitalism. All the while, their very rejection of consumerism bolsters ongoing commodification of indigenous culture and collapses indigeneity, nature, and tradition onto one another...
December 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27666134/the-work-of-inscription-antenatal-care-birth-documents-and-shan-migrant-women-in-chiang-mai
#16
Bo Kyeong Seo
For transnational migrant populations, securing birth documents of newly born children has crucial importance in avoiding statelessness for new generations. Drawing on discussions of sovereignty and political subjectivization, I ask how the fact of birth is constituted in the context of transnational migration. Based on ethnographic data collected from an antenatal clinic in Thailand, this article describes how Shan migrant women from Myanmar (also known as Burma) utilize reproductive health services as a way of assuring a safe birth while acquiring identification documents...
December 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27576791/from-the-technician-thing-to-the-mental-game-masculinity-and-u-s-homebirth
#17
April Driesslein
Previous research on pregnancy and birth from the perspective of men has found that men approach them from the perspective of hegemonic masculinity, though many find that hospital birth is a time of potential failure at masculinity. In this qualitative study of 11 men who had children born at home, I find that, like their hospital-birth counterparts, they find roles in their partners' pregnancies and early labors that are congruent with hegemonic masculinity. In ways that converge and diverge with the experience of hospital-birth fathers, they find their masculinity disrupted as the birth approaches, becoming nurturers and servers rather than technicians and protectors...
December 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27380813/from-reproductive-rights-to-responsibilization-fashioning-liberal-subjects-in-mexico-city-s-new-public-sector-abortion-program
#18
Elyse Ona Singer
Building on medical anthropology literature that analyzes doctor-patient interactions as a charged site for the production of political subjectivities, I demonstrate how a central feature of Mexico City's new public sector abortion program involves "responsibilization." In accordance with entrenched Ministry of Health objectives, providers transmit a suite of values about personal responsibility and self-regulation through the use of birth control, hinging abortion rights to responsible reproductive subjectivity...
December 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29023968/pregnant-metaphors-and-surrogate-meanings-bringing-the-ethnography-of-pregnancy-and-surrogacy-into-conversation-in-israel-and-beyond
#19
Tsipy Ivry, Elly Teman
This article explores the way that surrogacy and normal pregnancy share cultural assumptions about pregnancy. Through a juxtaposition of our ethnographic studies of two groups of Jewish-Israeli women-women who have undergone "normal," low-risk pregnancies and women who have given birth as gestational surrogates-we argue that surrogacy and pregnancy emerge as potent metaphors for one another. Both pregnant women and surrogates divided their bodies into two separate realms: fetus and maternal pregnant body...
October 11, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28980733/living-the-social-determinants-of-health-assemblages-in-a-remote-aboriginal-community
#20
Richard D Chenhall, Kate Senior
This article provides a critical discussion of the social determinants of health framework and compares it with theoretical perspectives, such as that offered by assemblage theory, offering an alternative view of the complex interplay between human relationships and the structures around us. We offer an ethnographic perspective, discussing the lived experiences of the social determinants in an Indigenous community in a remote part of northern Australia.
October 5, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
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