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Medical Anthropology Quarterly

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28556397/body-image-models-among-low-income-african-american-mothers-and-daughters-in-the-southeast-united-states
#1
Martina Thomas, Jason A DeCaro
Obesity among low-income African American women has been studied using the concepts of both satisfaction and acceptance. The satisfaction frame suggests greater satisfaction with their bodies than their white counterparts, irrespective of size. The acceptance frame suggests that alternative aesthetics serve as resistance against intersectional marginalization. Yet, while these women accept their body size in defiance of thinness ideals, they may not be satisfied. We describe cultural models of body image among mothers and daughters in Alabama...
May 29, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28556378/security-and-the-traumatized-street-child-how-gender-shapes-international-psychiatric-aid-in-cairo
#2
Rania Kassab Sweis
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 29, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28556358/buffering-the-uneven-impact-of-the-affordable-care-act-immigrant-serving-safety-net-providers-in-new-mexico
#3
Christina M Getrich, Jacqueline M García, Angélica Solares, Miria Kano
We conducted a study in early 2014 to document how the initial implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) affected health care provision to different categories of immigrants from the perspective of health care providers in New Mexico. Though ACA navigators led enrollment, providers nevertheless became involved by necessity, expressing concern about how immigrants were faring in the newly configured health care environment and taking on advocacy roles. Providers described interpreting shifting eligibility and coverage, attending to vulnerable under/uninsured patients, and negotiating new bureaucratic barriers for insured patients...
May 29, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28409861/neocolonialism-and-health-care-access-among-marshall-islanders-in-the-united-states
#4
Michael R Duke
In the Marshall Islands, a history of extensive nuclear weapons testing and covert biomedical research, coupled with the U.S.'s ongoing military presence in the country, has severely compromised the health of the local population. Despite the U.S.'s culpability in producing ill health along with high rates of emigration from the islands to the mainland United States, the large portion of Marshallese who reside in the United States face substantial barriers to accessing health care. Drawing from ongoing field research with a Marshallese community in Arkansas, this article explores the multifaceted impediments that U...
April 13, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28387005/ethical-gifts-an-analysis-of-soap-for-data-transactions-in-malawian-survey-research-worlds
#5
Crystal Biruk
In 2008, thousands of Malawians received soap from an American research project as a gift for survey participation. Soap was deemed an ethical, non-coercive gift by researchers and ethics boards, but took on meanings that expressed recipients' grievances and aspirations. Research participants reframed soap and research benefits as "rights" they are entitled to, wages for "work," and a symbol of exploitation. Enlisting the perspectives of Malawi's ethics board, demographers, Malawian fieldworkers, and research participants, I describe how soap is spoken about and operates in research worlds...
April 7, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28370246/electronic-health-records-and-the-disappearing-patient
#6
Linda M Hunt, Hannah S Bell, Allison M Baker, Heather A Howard
With rapid consolidation of American medicine into large-scale corporations, corporate strategies are coming to the forefront in health care delivery, requiring a dramatic increase in the amount and detail of documentation, implemented through use of electronic health records (EHRs). EHRs are structured to prioritize the interests of a myriad of political and corporate stakeholders, resulting in a complex, multi-layered, and cumbersome health records system, largely not directly relevant to clinical care. Drawing on observations conducted in outpatient specialty clinics, we consider how EHRs prioritize institutional needs manifested as a long list of requisites that must be documented with each consultation...
March 31, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27159357/routines-hope-and-antiretroviral-treatment-among-men-and-women-in-uganda
#7
Margaret S Winchester, Janet W McGrath, David Kaawa-Mafigiri, Florence Namutiibwa, George Ssendegye, Amina Nalwoga, Emily Kyarikunda, Judith Birungi, Sheila Kisakye, Nicholas Ayebazibwe, Eddy J Walakira, Charles Rwabukwali
Antiretroviral treatment programs, despite biomedical emphases, require social understanding and transformations to be successful. In this article, we draw from a qualitative study of HIV treatment seeking to examine the drug-taking routines and health-related subjectivities of men and women on antiretroviral treatment (ART) at two sites in Uganda. We show that while not all participants in ART programs understand clinical protocols in biomedical terms, they adopt treatment-taking strategies to integrate medication into daily practices and social spaces...
June 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28299834/guadalupan-devotion-as-a-moderator-of-psychosocial-stress-among-mexican-immigrants-in-the-rural-southern-united-states
#8
Mary Rebecca Read-Wahidi, Jason A DeCaro
This study considers how shared devotion to the Virgin of Guadalupe among Mexican immigrants in rural Mississippi buffers the effects of immigration stress. Rural destinations lacking social services can quickly compound the already stressful experience of immigration. Guadalupe devotion provides a way of coping with the daily life stressors of immigration. We test the hypothesis that high consonance in the cultural model of Guadalupan devotion will moderate the adverse health effects of immigration stress...
March 15, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28295596/embedded-narratives-metabolic-disorders-and-pentecostal-conversion-in-samoa
#9
Jessica Hardin
Drawing from interviews and participant observation, this article explores the intersection of diagnosis of metabolic disorders and religious conversion among Pentecostal Christians in Samoa by analyzing what I call embedded narratives--conversion narratives embedded in illness narratives. Drawing from ethnographic data, I examine how using conversion narrative conventions enabled those living with metabolic disorders to narrate behavior change in a culturally and socially valorized way. By embedding their narratives, I suggest those living with metabolic disorders shifted the object of care from a disease process toward the creation of a religious life and in turn transformed the risks associated with metabolic disorders, including diet, exercise, and pharmaceutical use into moral risks associated with everyday religious life...
March 10, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28295590/shifting-gears-triage-and-traffic-in-urban-india
#10
Harris Solomon
While studies of triage in clinical medical literature tend to focus on the knowledge required to carry out sorting, this article details the spatial features of triage. It is based on participation observation of traffic-related injuries in a Mumbai hospital casualty ward. It pays close attention to movement, specifically to adjustments, which include moving bodies, changes in treatment priority, and interruptions in care. The article draws on several ethnographic cases of injury and its aftermath that gather and separate patients, kin, and bystanders, all while a triage medical authority is charged with sorting them out...
March 10, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28261871/-you-can-learn-merely-by-listening-to-the-way-a-patient-walks-through-the-door-the-transmission-of-sensory-medical-knowledge
#11
Gili Hammer
Examining the mechanisms of medical knowledge transfer, this article addresses the ways nonvisual senses are employed within medical training, asking about the role of sound, touch, and movement in transmitting knowledge of the body. Based on a 10-month ethnography in a medical massage training course for blind students, the article examines the ways sensory medical knowledge is transferred in this setting. I discuss the multisensory characteristics of medical knowledge transfer, and the dual process inherent in this sensory pedagogy, in which senses such as touch and hearing undergo medicalization and scientification, while medicine enters the realm of the sensorial...
March 6, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28261857/recognizing-dementia-constructing-deconstruction-in-a-danish-memory-clinic
#12
Iben M Gjødsbøl, Mette N Svendsen
This article investigates how a person with dementia is made up through intersubjective acts of recognition. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in a Danish memory clinic, we show that identification of disease requires patients to be substituted by their relatives in constructing believable medical narratives; yet during memory testing, patients are not allowed any substitution to clearly expose cognitive shortcomings. In combining works of theorists Ian Hacking and Paul Ricoeur, we argue that the clinical identification of dementia unmakes the knowing subject, a deconstruction that threatens to misrecognize and humiliate the person under examination...
March 6, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26698378/the-effects-of-water-insecurity-and-emotional-distress-on-civic-action-for-improved-water-infrastructure-in-rural-south-africa
#13
Nicola Bulled
The South African constitution ratifies water as a human right. Yet millions of citizens remain disconnected from the national water infrastructure. Drawing on data collected in 2013-2014 from women in northern South Africa, this study explores "water citizenship"-individual civic engagement related to improving water service provision. Literature indicates that water insecurity is associated with emotional distress and that water-related emotional distress influences citizen engagement. I extend these lines of research by assessing the connection that water insecurity and emotional distress may collectively have with civic engagement to improve access to water infrastructure...
March 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28215053/-the-first-intervention-is-leaving-home-reasons-for-electing-an-out-of-hospital-birth-among-minnesotan-mothers
#14
Helen Hazen
The Twin Cities, Minnesota has seen a recent increase in the number of mothers seeking an out-of-hospital birth. This research uses in-depth interviews with 24 mothers who intended an out-of-hospital birth in the previous two years, exploring their reasons for pursuing an alternative approach to birth. For many women an out-of-hospital birth fits within a philosophy that rejects the pathologizing of birth. Escaping rigid hospital protocols is seen as critical to avoiding what many mothers described as unnecessary interventions...
February 18, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025859/negotiations-of-blame-and-care-among-hiv-positive-mothers-and-daughters-in-south-africa-s-eastern-cape
#15
Beth Vale
Research delineates two epidemiological categories among HIV-positive adolescents: those who contract the virus sexually and those who inherit it as infants. In this article, I am interested in how tacit inferences about adolescents' mode of infection contribute to their experiences of HIV-related blame, and their ability to achieve care, in their intimate, everyday settings. The analysis arises from ethnographic research with 23 HIV-positive adolescents living in South Africa's Eastern Cape. From these, I draw particularly on the narratives of four HIV-positive teenage girls and their HIV-positive mothers...
December 26, 2016: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025858/the-new-rich-and-their-unplanned-births-stratified-reproduction-under-china-s-birth-planning-policy
#16
Lihong Shi
This article explores the creation and ramifications of a stratified reproductive system under China's state control of reproduction. Within this system, an emerging group of "new rich" are able to circumvent birth regulations and have unplanned births because of their financial capabilities and social networks. While China's birth-planning policy is meant to be enforced equally for all couples, the unequal access to wealth and bureaucratic power as a result of China's widening social polarization has created disparate reproductive rights and experiences...
December 26, 2016: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27558762/culture-and-comorbidity-intimate-partner-violence-as-a-common-risk-factor-for-maternal-mental-illness-and-reproductive-health-problems-among-former-child-soldiers-in-nepal
#17
Brandon A Kohrt, Christine Bourey
Our objective was to elucidate how culture influences internal (psychological), external (social), institutional (structural), and health care (medical) processes, which, taken together, create differential risk of comorbidity across contexts. To develop a conceptual model, we conducted qualitative research with 13 female child soldiers in Nepal. Participants gave open-ended responses to intimate partner violence (IPV) vignettes (marital rape, emotional abuse, violence during pregnancy). Twelve participants (92%) endorsed personal responses (remaining silent, enduring violence, forgiving the husband)...
December 2016: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27555467/special-section-on-comorbidity-introduction
#18
Lesley Jo Weaver, Ron Barrett, Mark Nichter
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26990322/enveloped-lives-practicing-health-and-care-in-lithuania
#19
Rima Praspaliauskiene
This article analyzes informal medical payments that the majority of Lithuanians give or feel compelled to give to doctors before or after treatment. It focuses on how patients and their caretakers encounter, practice, and enact informal payments in health care and how these payments create a reality of health care that is not limited to an economic rationality. Within such a frame, rather than being considered a gift or bribe, it conceptualizes these little white envelopes as a practice of health and care...
December 2016: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26990219/locating-purity-within-corruption-rumors-narratives-of-hpv-vaccination-refusal-in-a-peri-urban-community-of-southern-romania
#20
Cristina A Pop
This article locates the symbolic construction of "corrupted purity"-as a key assertion in Romanian parents' HPV vaccination refusal narratives-within a multiplicity of entangled rumors concerning reproduction and the state. Romania's unsuccessful HPV vaccination campaign is not unique. However, the shifting discourses around purity and corruption-through which some parents conveyed anxieties about their daughters being targeted for the vaccine-place a particular twist on the Romanian case of resisting the HPV vaccination...
December 2016: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
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