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Medical Anthropology Quarterly

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30015362/stuck-in-the-clinic-vernacular-healing-and-medical-anthropology-in-contemporary-sub-saharan-africa
#1
China Scherz
While vernacular therapeutics had long been a topic of interest to many writing about medicine and healing in Africa, with a few exceptions most recent anthropological writings on medicine in Africa are focused on biomedicine. In this article, I trace this shift back to the turn of the millennium and the convergence of three events: the emergence of global health, the accession of the occult economies paradigm, and critiques of culturalism in medical anthropology. I argue that these three shifts led to research projects and priorities that looked different from those defined and undertaken as late as the late 1990s...
July 17, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30014621/choreographing-death-a-social-phenomenology-of-medical-aid-in-dying-in-the-united-states
#2
Mara Buchbinder
This article draws on ethnographic research on the implementation of Vermont's 2013 medical aid-in-dying (AID) law to explore a fundamental paradox: while public discourse characterizes AID as a mechanism for achieving an individually-controlled autonomous death, the medico-legal framework that organizes it enlists social support and cultivates dependencies. Therefore, while patients pursuing AID may avoid certain types of dependency-such as those involved in bodily care-the process requires them to affirm and strengthen other bureaucratic, material, and affective forms...
July 16, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30003599/hookworms-make-us-human-the-microbiome-eco-immunology-and-a-probiotic-turn-in-western-health-care
#3
Jamie Lorimer
Historians of science have identified an ecological turn underway in immunology, driven by the mapping of the human microbiome and wider environmentalist anxieties. A figure is emerging of the human as a holobiont, composed of microbes and threatened by both microbial excess and microbial absence. Antimicrobial approaches to germ warfare are being supplemented by probiotic approaches to restoring microbial life. This article examines the political ecology of this probiotic turn in Western health care. It focuses on Necator americanus-a species of human hookworm-and its relations with immunologists...
July 13, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29968939/the-binds-of-global-health-partnership-working-out-working-together-in-sierra-leone
#4
Clare Herrick, Andrew Brooks
Global health partnerships (GHPs) are the conceptual cousin of partnerships in the development sphere. Since their emergence in the 1990s, the GHP mode of working and funding has mainly been applied to single-disease, vertical interventions. However, GHPs are increasingly being used to enact health systems strengthening and to address the global health worker shortage. In contrast to other critical explorations of GHPs, we explore in this article how the fact, act, and aspiration of binding different actors together around the ideology and modes of partnership working produces the perpetual state of being in a bind...
July 3, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29968935/a-crisis-of-care-the-politics-and-therapeutics-of-a-rape-crisis-hotline
#5
Emma Louise Backe
This article explores the politics and contingencies of care provided to survivors of sexual assault on a rape crisis hotline in the U.S.'s mid-Atlantic region. The support provided to survivors on the hotline represents a crisis of care, one fomented by the victim services sector's failure to address the limitations of a crisis-oriented paradigm or survivors' chronic trauma. The tension between the survivor-centered model of the hotline and the mental health needs of clients represents a friction of utility-a misalignment between the care hotline advocates provide and the support survivors seek...
July 2, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29931816/training-dogs-to-feel-good-embodying-wellbeing-in-multispecies-relations
#6
Natalie Hannah Porter
Social science concepts of well-being are largely premised on notions of a common humanity with shared physical needs and broadly legible experiences of the world. While medical anthropologists have interrogated ideas of universal bodily subjectivities, articulations of well-being across species boundaries remain underexplored. This article offers a conceptualization of well-being that attends to species difference. Drawing on ethnographic research with an animal rescue organization, I argue that in the context of partially connected bodily experiences, rescue workers navigate distinctions between dogs' internal feelings and external actions, and they train their bodies alongside dogs' bodies to cultivate canine well-being...
June 21, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29023968/pregnant-metaphors-and-surrogate-meanings-bringing-the-ethnography-of-pregnancy-and-surrogacy-into-conversation-in-israel-and-beyond
#7
Tsipy Ivry, Elly Teman
This article explores the way that surrogacy and normal pregnancy share cultural assumptions about pregnancy. Through a juxtaposition of our ethnographic studies of two groups of Jewish-Israeli women-women who have undergone "normal," low-risk pregnancies and women who have given birth as gestational surrogates-we argue that surrogacy and pregnancy emerge as potent metaphors for one another. Both pregnant women and surrogates divided their bodies into two separate realms: fetus and maternal pregnant body...
June 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28980733/living-the-social-determinants-of-health-assemblages-in-a-remote-aboriginal-community
#8
Richard D Chenhall, Kate Senior
This article provides a critical discussion of the social determinants of health framework and compares it with theoretical perspectives, such as that offered by assemblage theory, offering an alternative view of the complex interplay between human relationships and the structures around us. We offer an ethnographic perspective, discussing the lived experiences of the social determinants in an Indigenous community in a remote part of northern Australia.
June 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28980396/corporate-mortality-files-and-late-industrial-necropolitics
#9
Peter C Little
This article critically examines the corporate production, archival politics, and socio-legal dimensions of corporate mortality files (CMFs), the largest corporate archive developed by IBM to systematically document industrial exposures and occupational health outcomes for electronics workers. I first provide a history of IBM's CMF project, which amounts to a comprehensive mortality record for IBM employees over the past 40 years. Next, I explore a recent case in Endicott, New York, birthplace of IBM, where the U...
June 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28800188/care-in-the-context-of-a-chronic-epidemic-caring-for-diabetes-in-chicago-s-native-community
#10
Margaret Pollak
American Indians have some of the highest rates of diabetes worldwide, and they are disproportionately affected by the secondary complications of the disease. While most research on Native populations focuses on reservations, this study investigates diabetes care in Chicago's Native community. People living with diabetes manage blood sugar levels to prevent the development of secondary complications. As with many diabetics, the majority of their health care work is completed outside of the biomedical setting...
June 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28766753/to-keep-this-disease-from-killing-you-cultural-competence-consonance-and-health-among-hiv-positive-women-in-kenya
#11
Toni Copeland
The HIV/AIDS crisis continues in sub-Saharan Africa, where nearly 70% of infections are found. Despite recent efforts to supply antiretroviral therapy to those infected, most are not receiving medication and are forced to rely on self-management to remain healthy. In Kenya, many of those infected are women living in extreme poverty. This article presents the findings of research among poor women in Nairobi that examined the relationship between knowledge of a cultural model of self-managing HIV/AIDS, cultural consonance, and health...
June 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28726292/-in-visibility-online-the-benefits-of-online-patient-forums-for-people-with-a-hidden-illness-the-case-of-multiple-chemical-sensitivity-mcs
#12
Tarryn Phillips, Tyson Rees
Sufferers of medically unexplained conditions that are not observable in the clinic can experience multiple layers of invisibility: a lack of biomedical diagnosis; legal skepticism; political disinterest; and a loss of their prior social identity. For those with environmental sensitivities, this is compounded by literal hiddenness due to often being housebound. Drawing on an online survey of people with multiple chemical sensitivity, this article examines how the everyday experience of invisibility is mitigated by engaging with other patients online...
June 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28556397/body-image-models-among-low-income-african-american-mothers-and-daughters-in-the-southeast-united-states
#13
Martina Thomas, Jason A DeCaro
Obesity among low-income African American women has been studied using the concepts of both satisfaction and acceptance. The satisfaction frame suggests greater satisfaction with their bodies than their white counterparts, irrespective of size. The acceptance frame suggests that alternative aesthetics serve as resistance against intersectional marginalization. Yet, while these women accept their body size in defiance of thinness ideals, they may not be satisfied. We describe cultural models of body image among mothers and daughters in Alabama...
June 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28556358/buffering-the-uneven-impact-of-the-affordable-care-act-immigrant-serving-safety-net-providers-in-new-mexico
#14
Christina M Getrich, Jacqueline M García, Angélica Solares, Miria Kano
We conducted a study in early 2014 to document how the initial implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) affected health care provision to different categories of immigrants from the perspective of health care providers in New Mexico. Though ACA navigators led enrollment, a range of providers nevertheless became involved by necessity, expressing concern about how immigrants were faring in the newly configured health care environment and taking on advocacy roles. Providers described interpreting shifting eligibility and coverage, attending to vulnerable under/uninsured patients, and negotiating new bureaucratic barriers for insured patients...
June 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29700845/re-racialization-of-addiction-and-the-redistribution-of-blame-in-the-white-opioid-epidemic
#15
Sonia Mendoza, Allyssa Stephanie Rivera, Helena Bjerring Hansen
New York City has the largest number of opioid dependent people of U.S. cities, and within New York, Whites have the highest rate of prescription opioid and heroin overdose deaths. The rise of opioid abuse among Whites has resulted in popular narratives of victimization by prescribers, framing of addiction as a biological disease, and the promise of pharmaceutical treatments that differ from the criminalizing narratives that have historically described urban Latino and black narcotic use. Through an analysis of popular media press and interviews with opioid prescribers and community pharmacists in Staten Island-the epicenter of opioid overdose in New York City and the most suburban and white of its boroughs-we found that narratives of white opioid users disrupted notions of the addict as "other," producing alternative logics of blame that focus on prescribers and the encroachment of dealers from outside of white neighborhoods...
April 27, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29700851/-accept-and-utilize-alternative-medicine-minimality-and-ethics-in-an-indonesian-healing-collective
#16
Nicholas J Long
Cosmopolitan forms of alternative medicine have become very popular in contemporary Indonesia. Many healers have trained in an eclectic range of techniques, predicated on ontological claims so diverse that they call each other's legitimacy into question. This article explores how a collective of alternative healers in central Java navigated the quandaries presented by such therapeutic eclecticism over a six-year period. Healers' engagement with, or indifference toward, the principles underpinning therapeutic efficacy fluctuated in ways that allowed them to surmount the dilemmas of Islamization, the changing demographic of their collective's membership, and the threat of commercialization, thereby maintaining a medical landscape in which alternative healing was widely available and accessible...
April 26, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29665064/tourism-labor-embodied-suffering-and-the-deportation-regime-in-the-dominican-republic
#17
Mark Padilla, José Félix Colón-Burgos, Nelson Varas-Díaz, Armando Matiz-Reyes, Caroline Mary Parker
In this article, we use syndemic theory to examine socio-structural factors that result in heightened vulnerability to HIV infection and drug addiction among Dominican deportees who survive post-deportation through informal tourism labor. Through an ongoing NIDA-funded ethnographic study of the syndemic of HIV and problematic drug use among men involved in tourism labor in the Dominican Republic, we argue that the legal and political-economic context of the global deportation regime contributes to structural vulnerabilities among deportees in the Dominican Republic, most of whom are men with histories of incarceration in the United States and/or Puerto Rico...
April 17, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29572952/a-genealogy-of-animal-diseases-and-social-anthropology-1870-2000
#18
Frédéric Keck
Culling, vaccinating, and monitoring animals are the three main techniques used in contemporary veterinary public health to manage animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans. Each technique is underpinned by different ontological understandings of how microbes figure in relations between humans and animals. Therefore, animal diseases are not only a question for an applied anthropology but also involve the theoretical core of the discipline: that is, understanding how social causality emerges out of physical causality...
March 23, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29520829/cell-phones-%C3%A2-self-and-other-problems-with-big-data-detection-and-containment-during-epidemics
#19
Susan L Erikson
Evidence from Sierra Leone reveals the significant limitations of big data in disease detection and containment efforts. Early in the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic in West Africa, media heralded HealthMap's ability to detect the outbreak from newsfeeds. Later, big data-specifically, call detail record data collected from millions of cell phones-was hyped as useful for stopping the disease by tracking contagious people. It did not work. In this article, I trace the causes of big data's containment failures. During epidemics, big data experiments can have opportunity costs: namely, forestalling urgent response...
March 8, 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28872187/the-attachment-imperative-parental-experiences-of-relation-making-in-a-danish-neonatal-intensive-care-unit
#20
Laura E Navne, Mette N Svendsen, Tine M Gammeltoft
In this article, we explore how parents establish relations with extremely premature infants whose lives and futures are uncertain. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in a Danish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), we engage recent discussions of the limits of conventional anthropological thinking on social relations and point to the productive aspects of practices of distance and detachment. We show that while the NICU upholds an imperative of attachment independently of the infant's chances of survival, for parents, attachment is contingent on certain hesitations in relation to their infant...
March 2018: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
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