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Medical Anthropology Quarterly

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28804960/handle-with-care-rethinking-the-rights-versus-culture-dichotomy-in-cancer-disclosure-in-india
#1
Cecilia Coale Van Hollen
Medical practitioners, bioethicists, psychologists, and anthropologists have debated whether it is ethical to disclose or withhold information from patients about cancer diagnoses. This debate is framed as pitting universal individual human rights against cultural pluralism. The rights-based argument asserts that people have a right to information about their own health to make the best decisions about their treatment. The cultural variation argument suggests that in some cultural contexts there is a perception that information about one's cancer diagnosis may cause more harm than good due to the psychological trauma this may cause...
August 13, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28800188/care-in-the-context-of-a-chronic-epidemic-caring-for-diabetes-in-chicago-s-native-community
#2
Margaret Pollak
American Indians have some of the highest rates of diabetes worldwide, and they are disproportionately affected by the secondary complications of the disease. While most research on Native populations focuses on reservations, this study investigates diabetes care in Chicago's Native community. People living with diabetes manage blood sugar levels to prevent the development of secondary complications. As with many diabetics, the majority of their health care work is completed outside of the biomedical setting...
August 11, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28791731/only-near-is-dear-doing-elderly-care-with-everyday-icts-in-indian-transnational-families
#3
Tanja Ahlin
In Kerala, South India, young people, especially women, are encouraged to become nurses in order to migrate abroad for work and thereby improve the financial status of their family. Meanwhile, many of their parents remain in India by themselves. This is occurring in the context of a strong popular discourse of elder abandonment, related to the local norms of intergenerational co-habitation. Based on fieldwork in Kerala and one of the nurses' destination countries, Oman, I present evidence that complicates this discourse by showing how: (1) migration is a form of elder care practice in itself; and (2) care for the elderly continues across countries and continents with the help of information and communication technologies (ICTs)...
August 9, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28776771/efficacious-holidays-the-therapeutic-dimensions-of-pleasure-and-discipline-in-czech-respiratory-spas
#4
Susanna Trnka
As evidence-based medicine has increasingly become the standard for assessing the efficacy of health care, the Czech Republic finds itself in a dilemma, with centuries of sanatorium-style spa treatments resisting easy categorization. Despite some critics' contentions that spas are "pointless holidays" and reductions in government funding of health spas, in 2014 Czech courts affirmed every Czech citizen's right to spa treatments if their health status merits it. Drawing on research in two children's respiratory spas, this article considers the experiences of patients aged two-15 and their accompanying parents or guardians (mainly mothers) to suggest that in addition to the range of therapeutic procedures highlighted within spa cures, more amorphous aspects-such as pleasure and discipline-may be just as central to spas' successes...
August 4, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28766753/to-keep-this-disease-from-killing-you-cultural-competence-consonance-and-health-among-hiv-positive-women-in-kenya
#5
Toni Copeland
The HIV/AIDS crisis continues in sub-Saharan Africa, where nearly 70% of infections are found. Despite recent efforts to supply antiretroviral therapy to those infected, most are not receiving medication and are forced to rely on self-management to remain healthy. In Kenya, many of those infected are women living in extreme poverty. This article presents the findings of research among poor women in Nairobi that examined the relationship between knowledge of a cultural model of self-managing HIV/AIDS, cultural consonance, and health...
August 2, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28726292/-in-visibility-online-the-benefits-of-online-patient-forums-for-people-with-a-hidden-illness-the-case-of-multiple-chemical-sensitivities-mcs
#6
Tarryn Phillips, Tyson Rees
Sufferers of medically unexplained conditions that are not observable in the clinic can experience multiple layers of invisibility: a lack of biomedical diagnosis; legal skepticism; political disinterest; and a loss of their prior social identity. For those with environmental sensitivities, this is compounded by literal hiddenness due to often being housebound. Drawing on an online survey of people with multiple chemical sensitivity, this article examines how the everyday experience of invisibility is mitigated by engaging with other patients online...
July 20, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28556397/body-image-models-among-low-income-african-american-mothers-and-daughters-in-the-southeast-united-states
#7
Martina Thomas, Jason A DeCaro
Obesity among low-income African American women has been studied using the concepts of both satisfaction and acceptance. The satisfaction frame suggests greater satisfaction with their bodies than their white counterparts, irrespective of size. The acceptance frame suggests that alternative aesthetics serve as resistance against intersectional marginalization. Yet, while these women accept their body size in defiance of thinness ideals, they may not be satisfied. We describe cultural models of body image among mothers and daughters in Alabama...
May 29, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28556378/security-and-the-traumatized-street-child-how-gender-shapes-international-psychiatric-aid-in-cairo
#8
Rania Kassab Sweis
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 29, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28556358/buffering-the-uneven-impact-of-the-affordable-care-act-immigrant-serving-safety-net-providers-in-new-mexico
#9
Christina M Getrich, Jacqueline M García, Angélica Solares, Miria Kano
We conducted a study in early 2014 to document how the initial implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) affected health care provision to different categories of immigrants from the perspective of health care providers in New Mexico. Though ACA navigators led enrollment, providers nevertheless became involved by necessity, expressing concern about how immigrants were faring in the newly configured health care environment and taking on advocacy roles. Providers described interpreting shifting eligibility and coverage, attending to vulnerable under/uninsured patients, and negotiating new bureaucratic barriers for insured patients...
May 29, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27159357/routines-hope-and-antiretroviral-treatment-among-men-and-women-in-uganda
#10
Margaret S Winchester, Janet W McGrath, David Kaawa-Mafigiri, Florence Namutiibwa, George Ssendegye, Amina Nalwoga, Emily Kyarikunda, Judith Birungi, Sheila Kisakye, Nicholas Ayebazibwe, Eddy J Walakira, Charles Rwabukwali
Antiretroviral treatment programs, despite biomedical emphases, require social understanding and transformations to be successful. In this article, we draw from a qualitative study of HIV treatment seeking to examine the drug-taking routines and health-related subjectivities of men and women on antiretroviral treatment (ART) at two sites in Uganda. We show that while not all participants in ART programs understand clinical protocols in biomedical terms, they adopt treatment-taking strategies to integrate medication into daily practices and social spaces...
June 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28409861/neocolonialism-and-health-care-access-among-marshall-islanders-in-the-united-states
#11
Michael R Duke
In the Marshall Islands, a history of extensive nuclear weapons testing and covert biomedical research, coupled with the U.S.'s ongoing military presence in the country, has severely compromised the health of the local population. Despite the U.S.'s culpability in producing ill health along with high rates of emigration from the islands to the mainland United States, the large portion of Marshallese who reside in the United States face substantial barriers to accessing health care. Drawing from ongoing field research with a Marshallese community in Arkansas, this article explores the multifaceted impediments that U...
April 13, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28387005/ethical-gifts-an-analysis-of-soap-for-data-transactions-in-malawian-survey-research-worlds
#12
Crystal Biruk
In 2008, thousands of Malawians received soap from an American research project as a gift for survey participation. Soap was deemed an ethical, non-coercive gift by researchers and ethics boards, but took on meanings that expressed recipients' grievances and aspirations. Research participants reframed soap and research benefits as "rights" they are entitled to, wages for "work," and a symbol of exploitation. Enlisting the perspectives of Malawi's ethics board, demographers, Malawian fieldworkers, and research participants, I describe how soap is spoken about and operates in research worlds...
April 7, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28370246/electronic-health-records-and-the-disappearing-patient
#13
Linda M Hunt, Hannah S Bell, Allison M Baker, Heather A Howard
With rapid consolidation of American medicine into large-scale corporations, corporate strategies are coming to the forefront in health care delivery, requiring a dramatic increase in the amount and detail of documentation, implemented through use of electronic health records (EHRs). EHRs are structured to prioritize the interests of a myriad of political and corporate stakeholders, resulting in a complex, multi-layered, and cumbersome health records system, largely not directly relevant to clinical care. Drawing on observations conducted in outpatient specialty clinics, we consider how EHRs prioritize institutional needs manifested as a long list of requisites that must be documented with each consultation...
March 31, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28299834/guadalupan-devotion-as-a-moderator-of-psychosocial-stress-among-mexican-immigrants-in-the-rural-southern-united-states
#14
Mary Rebecca Read-Wahidi, Jason A DeCaro
This study considers how shared devotion to the Virgin of Guadalupe among Mexican immigrants in rural Mississippi buffers the effects of immigration stress. Rural destinations lacking social services can quickly compound the already stressful experience of immigration. Guadalupe devotion provides a way of coping with the daily life stressors of immigration. We test the hypothesis that high consonance in the cultural model of Guadalupan devotion will moderate the adverse health effects of immigration stress...
March 15, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28295596/embedded-narratives-metabolic-disorders-and-pentecostal-conversion-in-samoa
#15
Jessica Hardin
Drawing from interviews and participant observation, this article explores the intersection of diagnosis of metabolic disorders and religious conversion among Pentecostal Christians in Samoa by analyzing what I call embedded narratives--conversion narratives embedded in illness narratives. Drawing from ethnographic data, I examine how using conversion narrative conventions enabled those living with metabolic disorders to narrate behavior change in a culturally and socially valorized way. By embedding their narratives, I suggest those living with metabolic disorders shifted the object of care from a disease process toward the creation of a religious life and in turn transformed the risks associated with metabolic disorders, including diet, exercise, and pharmaceutical use into moral risks associated with everyday religious life...
March 10, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28295590/shifting-gears-triage-and-traffic-in-urban-india
#16
Harris Solomon
While studies of triage in clinical medical literature tend to focus on the knowledge required to carry out sorting, this article details the spatial features of triage. It is based on participation observation of traffic-related injuries in a Mumbai hospital casualty ward. It pays close attention to movement, specifically to adjustments, which include moving bodies, changes in treatment priority, and interruptions in care. The article draws on several ethnographic cases of injury and its aftermath that gather and separate patients, kin, and bystanders, all while a triage medical authority is charged with sorting them out...
March 10, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28261871/-you-can-learn-merely-by-listening-to-the-way-a-patient-walks-through-the-door-the-transmission-of-sensory-medical-knowledge
#17
Gili Hammer
Examining the mechanisms of medical knowledge transfer, this article addresses the ways nonvisual senses are employed within medical training, asking about the role of sound, touch, and movement in transmitting knowledge of the body. Based on a 10-month ethnography in a medical massage training course for blind students, the article examines the ways sensory medical knowledge is transferred in this setting. I discuss the multisensory characteristics of medical knowledge transfer, and the dual process inherent in this sensory pedagogy, in which senses such as touch and hearing undergo medicalization and scientification, while medicine enters the realm of the sensorial...
March 6, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28261857/recognizing-dementia-constructing-deconstruction-in-a-danish-memory-clinic
#18
Iben M Gjødsbøl, Mette N Svendsen
This article investigates how a person with dementia is made up through intersubjective acts of recognition. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in a Danish memory clinic, we show that identification of disease requires patients to be substituted by their relatives in constructing believable medical narratives; yet during memory testing, patients are not allowed any substitution to clearly expose cognitive shortcomings. In combining works of theorists Ian Hacking and Paul Ricoeur, we argue that the clinical identification of dementia unmakes the knowing subject, a deconstruction that threatens to misrecognize and humiliate the person under examination...
March 6, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26698378/the-effects-of-water-insecurity-and-emotional-distress-on-civic-action-for-improved-water-infrastructure-in-rural-south-africa
#19
Nicola Bulled
The South African constitution ratifies water as a human right. Yet millions of citizens remain disconnected from the national water infrastructure. Drawing on data collected in 2013-2014 from women in northern South Africa, this study explores "water citizenship"-individual civic engagement related to improving water service provision. Literature indicates that water insecurity is associated with emotional distress and that water-related emotional distress influences citizen engagement. I extend these lines of research by assessing the connection that water insecurity and emotional distress may collectively have with civic engagement to improve access to water infrastructure...
March 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28215053/-the-first-intervention-is-leaving-home-reasons-for-electing-an-out-of-hospital-birth-among-minnesotan-mothers
#20
Helen Hazen
The Twin Cities, Minnesota has seen a recent increase in the number of mothers seeking an out-of-hospital birth. This research uses in-depth interviews with 24 mothers who intended an out-of-hospital birth in the previous two years, exploring their reasons for pursuing an alternative approach to birth. For many women an out-of-hospital birth fits within a philosophy that rejects the pathologizing of birth. Escaping rigid hospital protocols is seen as critical to avoiding what many mothers described as unnecessary interventions...
February 18, 2017: Medical Anthropology Quarterly
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