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Journal of Comparative Psychology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29283589/experience-with-featural-cue-reliability-influences-featural-and-geometric-cue-use-by-mice-mus-musculus
#1
Kevin Leonard, Na Tian, Tammy L Ivanco, Debbie M Kelly
Orienting is a critical skill for all mobile animals. Two commonly studied visual components used to guide orientation in an environment are geometric (e.g., distance or direction) and featural cues (e.g., color or texture). Previous research has shown that visual-cue use and cue weighing can depend on the navigator's previous experience, the nature and reliability of the cues, and genetic factors. Accordingly, the domestic mouse (Mus musculus) is a species of increasing interest because of its potential as a model for human neurological disorders with associated spatial disorientation, as is seen in Alzheimer's disease...
December 28, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29283588/do-capuchin-monkeys-sapajus-apella-know-the-contents-of-memory-traces-a-study-of-metamemory-for-compound-stimuli
#2
Saho Takagi, Kazuo Fujita
Whereas evidence has accumulated that nonhuman animals have access to the strength of their memory trace, it is unclear whether such metamemory contains components, as proposed by Hampton (2005). We assessed whether capuchin monkeys could recognize details of memorized items using a delayed matching-to-sample task. We used compound stimuli separable into 2 dimensions, "what" and "where." Two monkeys were trained to memorize both "what" and "where" a sample was and answer both/either "what" and/or "where" the sample was depending on each task after a delay...
December 28, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29283587/vocal-conditioning-in-kea-parrots-nestor-notabilis
#3
Amelia Wein, Raoul Schwing, Martine Hausberger, Rogelio Rodriguez, Ludwig Huber
In laboratory studies of vocal behavior in animals, subjects are normally isolated in a sound-insulated chamber for recording, but such socially isolated conditions may reduce the chances that they will vocalize. Indeed, past studies using such methods have faced the challenge that subjects remained silent. Knowledge of conditions under which subjects are more likely to vocalize could thus improve experimental design. This study investigated (a) whether kea (Nestor notabilis) could be trained to increase vocal production using operant conditioning and (b) the conditions under which such training was feasible...
December 28, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29239650/exploring-the-solitaire-illusion-in-guppies-poecilia-reticulata
#4
Maria Elena Miletto Petrazzini, Audrey E Parrish, Michael J Beran, Christian Agrillo
The solitaire illusion is a numerosity illusion that occurs when the spatial arrangement of items influences quantity estimation. To date, this illusion has been reported in monkeys, although it seems to be weaker compared with its prevalence in humans, and no study has investigated whether nonprimate species perceive it. In the present work, we asked whether a more distantly related species, fish, perceived the solitaire illusion. To achieve this goal, adult guppies (Poecilia reticulata) were trained to select the array containing the larger quantity of black dots in the presence of 2 mixed arrays containing white and black dots...
December 14, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29239649/goal-directed-tail-use-in-colombian-spider-monkeys-ateles-fusciceps-rufiventris-is-highly-lateralized
#5
Eliza L Nelson, Giulianna A Kendall
Behavioral laterality refers to a bias in the use of one side of the body over the other and is commonly studied in paired organs (e.g., hands, feet, eyes, antennae). Less common are reports of laterality in unpaired organs (e.g., trunk, tongue, tail). The goal of the current study was to examine tail use biases across different tasks in the Colombian spider monkey (Ateles fusciceps rufiventris) for the first time (N = 14). We hypothesized that task context and task complexity influence tail laterality in spider monkeys, and we predicted that monkeys would exhibit strong preferences for using the tail for manipulation to solve out-of-reach feeding problems, but not for using the tail at rest...
December 14, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29239648/the-influence-of-reward-quality-and-quantity-and-spatial-proximity-on-the-responses-to-inequity-and-contrast-in-capuchin-monkeys-cebus-sapajus-apella
#6
Catherine F Talbot, Audrey E Parrish, Julia Watzek, Jennifer L Essler, Kelly L Leverett, Annika Paukner, Sarah F Brosnan
Recent evidence within the field of comparative psychology has demonstrated that small differences in procedure may lead to significant differences in outcome. Therefore, failing to fully explore the impact of different contexts on a behavior limits our ability to fully understand that behavior. A behavior that has exhibited substantial variation, both within and across studies, is animals' responses to violations of their expectations, either when expectations were based on another's outcome (inequity) or one's previous outcome (contrast)...
December 14, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29239647/the-transfer-of-category-knowledge-by-macaques-macaca-mulatta-and-humans-homo-sapiens
#7
Alexandria C Zakrzewski, Barbara A Church, J David Smith
Cognitive psychologists distinguish implicit, procedural category learning (stimulus-response associations learned outside declarative cognition) from explicit-declarative category learning (conscious category rules). These systems are dissociated by category learning tasks with either a multidimensional, information-integration (II) solution or a unidimensional, rule-based (RB) solution. In the present experiments, humans and two monkeys learned II and RB category tasks fostering implicit and explicit learning, respectively...
December 14, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29239646/a-comparison-of-personality-in-the-common-and-bolivian-squirrel-monkey-saimiri-sciureus-and-saimiri-boliviensis
#8
Vanessa A D Wilson, Miho Inoue-Murayama, Alexander Weiss
Personality has been studied in all of the great apes, many Old World monkey species, but only a handful of New World monkey species. Because understanding the personalities of New World monkeys is crucial to understanding personality evolution in primates, we used the Hominoid Personality Questionnaire to assess personality in 55 common squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) and 40 Bolivian squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis). We found 4 personality components in each species, and labeled them Openness, Neuroticism, Assertiveness, and Agreeableness...
December 14, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29022726/common-marmoset-callithrix-jacchus-personality
#9
Sonja E Koski, Hannah M Buchanan-Smith, Hayley Ash, Judith M Burkart, Thomas Bugnyar, Alexander Weiss
Increasing evidence suggests that personality structure differs between species, but the evolutionary reasons for this variation are not fully understood. We built on earlier research on New World monkeys to further elucidate the evolution of personality structure in primates. We therefore examined personality in 100 family-reared adult common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) from 3 colonies on a 60-item questionnaire. Principal components analyses revealed 5 domains that were largely similar to those found in a previous study on captive, ex-pet, or formerly laboratory-housed marmosets that were housed in a sanctuary...
October 12, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28956937/carolina-chickadee-poecile-carolinensis-calling-behavior-in-response-to-threats-and-in-flight-flockmate-familiarity-matters
#10
Brittany A Coppinger, Anasthasia Sanchez de Launay, Todd M Freeberg
Signalers can vary their vocal behavior, depending on the presence or absence of conspecific group members, and on the composition of the group. Here we asked whether Carolina chickadee (Poecile carolinensis) signalers varied their vocal behavior, depending on whether they were in the presence of familiar or unfamiliar flockmates. We sorted 32 Carolina chickadees into 4 groups with 4 familiar birds each and 4 groups with 4 unfamiliar birds each and recorded their behavior in seminatural aviary settings. We presented the familiar and unfamiliar aviary groups with a variety of stimuli ranging in level of threat and assessed birds' calling behavior in these contexts...
September 28, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28857607/piagetian-liquid-conservation-in-grey-parrots-psittacus-erithacus
#11
Irene M Pepperberg, Suzanne L Gray, Justin S Lesser, Leigh Ann Hartsfield
An understanding of Piagetian liquid conservation was investigated in four Grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus), their ages ranging from initially less than 1 year old to 18 years old. They were tested in several conditions: on the ability to choose between (a) identical containers filled with a greater or lesser quantity of a desirable liquid to see if they would reliably take the larger amount and (b) equal quantities of liquid that were visibly or invisibly transferred from identical to different-sized containers to examine their abilities with respect to conservation...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28857606/on-the-clock-interval-timing-and-overshadowing-in-domestic-dogs-canis-familiaris
#12
Krista Macpherson, William A Roberts
Interval timing is an important skill that allows animals to approximate how much time has elapsed since a given event. Little, however, is known about interval timing in domestic dogs. In an initial experiment, dogs were trained to make an operant response on 30-s fixed intervals, with either a light or a tone + light compound signaling the beginning of the fixed interval. When dogs in the compound group were subsequently tested with nonreinforced 60-s tone-only probe trials, the dogs' rate of responding peaked near 30 s...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28857605/-i-am-going-to-groom-you-multiple-forms-of-play-fighting-in-gray-mouse-lemurs-microcebus-murinus
#13
Sergio M Pellis, Vivien C Pellis
Play fighting is a commonly reported form of play that involves competitive interactions that generally do not escalate to serious fighting. Although in many species what are competed over are the body targets that are bitten or struck in serious fighting, for many others, the competition can be over other forms of contact, such as sex, social grooming, and predation. In primates, the most detailed studies have been of species such as Old World monkeys, that engage in play fighting that simulates serious fighting, but reports of a number of others, especially among nocturnal prosimians, have noted that play fighting can also involve simulation of sex and grooming...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28857604/kea-nestor-notabilis-decide-early-when-to-wait-in-food-exchange-task
#14
Raoul Schwing, Stefan Weber, Thomas Bugnyar
The ability to forego an immediate reward in favor of a bigger or better one at a later point has been linked with advanced cognitive skills, such as impulse control and forward-planning, and can be assessed by the classic food exchange paradigm. While the ability to perform in such tasks has long been regarded as an exclusive trait of humans and some mammals, that is, primates and dogs, in recent years some bird species have been found to perform similarly as primates. Here we test 10 captive kea (Nestor notabilis), using a food exchange paradigm standardized in earlier experiments, but adding the use of a container to hold the initial item...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28857603/action-matching-biases-in-monkeys-sapajus-spp-in-a-stimulus-response-compatibility-task-evaluating-experience-dependent-malleability
#15
Eóin P O'Sullivan, Nicolas Claidière, Christine A Caldwell
Stimulus-response (S-R) compatibility effects occur when observing certain stimuli facilitate the performance of a related response and interfere with performing an incompatible or different response. Using stimulus-response action pairings, this phenomenon has been used to study imitation effects in humans, and here we use a similar procedure to examine imitative biases in nonhuman primates. Eight capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.) were trained to perform hand and mouth actions in a stimulus-response compatibility task...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28846001/slope-based-and-geometric-encoding-of-a-goal-location-by-the-terrestrial-toad-rhinella-arenarum
#16
María Inés Sotelo, Verner P Bingman, Rubén N Muzio
The current study was designed to test for the ability of terrestrial toads, Rhinella arenarum, to use slope as source of spatial information to locate a goal, and investigate the relative importance of slope and geometric information for goal localization. Toads were trained to locate a single, water-reward goal location in a corner of a rectangular arena placed on an incline. Once the toads learned the task, 3 types of probe trials were carried out to determine the relative use of slope and geometric information for goal localization...
August 28, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28414470/association-between-lateral-bias-and-personality-traits-in-the-domestic-dog-canis-familiaris
#17
Shanis Barnard, Deborah L Wells, Peter G Hepper, Adam D S Milligan
Behavioral laterality reflects the cerebral functional asymmetry. Measures of laterality have been associated with emotional stress, problem-solving, and personality in some vertebrate species. Thus far, the association between laterality and personality in the domestic dog has been largely overlooked. In this study, we investigated whether lateralized (left or right) and ambilateral dogs differed in their behavioral response to a standardized personality test. The dog's preferred paw to hold a Kong ball filled with food and the first paw used to step-off from a standing position were scored as laterality measures...
August 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333487/adaptation-of-the-arizona-cognitive-task-battery-for-use-with-the-ts65dn-mouse-model-mus-musculus-of-down-syndrome
#18
Michael R Hunsaker, Genevieve K Smith, Raymond P Kesner
We propose and validate a clear strategy to efficiently and comprehensively characterize neurobehavioral deficits in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome. This novel approach uses neurocognitive theory to design and select behavioral tasks that test specific hypotheses concerning the results of Down syndrome. In this article, we model the Arizona Cognitive Task Battery, used to study human populations with Down syndrome, in Ts65Dn mice. We observed specific deficits for spatial memory, impaired long-term memory for visual objects, acquisition and reversal of motor responses, reduced motor dexterity, and impaired adaptive function as measured by nesting and anxiety tasks...
August 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333486/transitive-inference-in-humans-homo-sapiens-and-rhesus-macaques-macaca-mulatta-after-massed-training-of-the-last-two-list-items
#19
Greg Jensen, Yelda Alkan, Fabian Muñoz, Vincent P Ferrera, Herbert S Terrace
Transitive inference (TI) is a classic learning paradigm for which the relative contributions of experienced rewards and representation-based inference have been debated vigorously, particularly regarding the notion that animals are capable of logic and reasoning. Rhesus macaque subjects and human participants performed a TI task in which, prior to learning a 7-item list (ABCDEFG), a block of trials presented exclusively the pair FG. Contrary to the expectation of associative models, the high prior rate of reward for F did not disrupt subsequent learning of the entire list...
August 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28650183/spatial-transposition-tasks-in-indian-sloth-bears-melursus-ursinus-and-bornean-sun-bears-helarctos-malayanus-euryspilus
#20
Daniela Hartmann, Marina Davila-Ross, Siew Te Wong, Josep Call, Marina Scheumann
Spatial transposition tasks assess individuals' ability to represent nonvisible spatial object displacements. Several nonhuman mammal species have been tested on this task including primates, cats, and dogs, but to date, great apes seem the only taxon that has repeatedly and consistently solved spatial transposition tasks. The authors investigated the ability of captive sloth and sun bears to solve spatial transposition tasks. Both species belong to the same taxonomic group as cats and dogs, but unlike them and similar to apes, they have an omnivorous diet that requires them to keep track of fruit sources in space and time...
June 26, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
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