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Journal of Comparative Psychology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28857607/piagetian-liquid-conservation-in-grey-parrots-psittacus-erithacus
#1
Irene M Pepperberg, Suzanne L Gray, Justin S Lesser, Leigh Ann Hartsfield
An understanding of Piagetian liquid conservation was investigated in four Grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus), their ages ranging from initially less than 1 year old to 18 years old. They were tested in several conditions: on the ability to choose between (a) identical containers filled with a greater or lesser quantity of a desirable liquid to see if they would reliably take the larger amount and (b) equal quantities of liquid that were visibly or invisibly transferred from identical to different-sized containers to examine their abilities with respect to conservation...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28857606/on-the-clock-interval-timing-and-overshadowing-in-domestic-dogs-canis-familiaris
#2
Krista Macpherson, William A Roberts
Interval timing is an important skill that allows animals to approximate how much time has elapsed since a given event. Little, however, is known about interval timing in domestic dogs. In an initial experiment, dogs were trained to make an operant response on 30-s fixed intervals, with either a light or a tone + light compound signaling the beginning of the fixed interval. When dogs in the compound group were subsequently tested with nonreinforced 60-s tone-only probe trials, the dogs' rate of responding peaked near 30 s...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28857605/-i-am-going-to-groom-you-multiple-forms-of-play-fighting-in-gray-mouse-lemurs-microcebus-murinus
#3
Sergio M Pellis, Vivien C Pellis
Play fighting is a commonly reported form of play that involves competitive interactions that generally do not escalate to serious fighting. Although in many species what are competed over are the body targets that are bitten or struck in serious fighting, for many others, the competition can be over other forms of contact, such as sex, social grooming, and predation. In primates, the most detailed studies have been of species such as Old World monkeys, that engage in play fighting that simulates serious fighting, but reports of a number of others, especially among nocturnal prosimians, have noted that play fighting can also involve simulation of sex and grooming...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28857604/kea-nestor-notabilis-decide-early-when-to-wait-in-food-exchange-task
#4
Raoul Schwing, Stefan Weber, Thomas Bugnyar
The ability to forego an immediate reward in favor of a bigger or better one at a later point has been linked with advanced cognitive skills, such as impulse control and forward-planning, and can be assessed by the classic food exchange paradigm. While the ability to perform in such tasks has long been regarded as an exclusive trait of humans and some mammals, that is, primates and dogs, in recent years some bird species have been found to perform similarly as primates. Here we test 10 captive kea (Nestor notabilis), using a food exchange paradigm standardized in earlier experiments, but adding the use of a container to hold the initial item...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28857603/action-matching-biases-in-monkeys-sapajus-spp-in-a-stimulus-response-compatibility-task-evaluating-experience-dependent-malleability
#5
Eóin P O'Sullivan, Nicolas Claidière, Christine A Caldwell
Stimulus-response (S-R) compatibility effects occur when observing certain stimuli facilitate the performance of a related response and interfere with performing an incompatible or different response. Using stimulus-response action pairings, this phenomenon has been used to study imitation effects in humans, and here we use a similar procedure to examine imitative biases in nonhuman primates. Eight capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.) were trained to perform hand and mouth actions in a stimulus-response compatibility task...
August 31, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28846001/slope-based-and-geometric-encoding-of-a-goal-location-by-the-terrestrial-toad-rhinella-arenarum
#6
María Inés Sotelo, Verner P Bingman, Rubén N Muzio
The current study was designed to test for the ability of terrestrial toads, Rhinella arenarum, to use slope as source of spatial information to locate a goal, and investigate the relative importance of slope and geometric information for goal localization. Toads were trained to locate a single, water-reward goal location in a corner of a rectangular arena placed on an incline. Once the toads learned the task, 3 types of probe trials were carried out to determine the relative use of slope and geometric information for goal localization...
August 28, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28650183/spatial-transposition-tasks-in-indian-sloth-bears-melursus-ursinus-and-bornean-sun-bears-helarctos-malayanus-euryspilus
#7
Daniela Hartmann, Marina Davila-Ross, Siew Te Wong, Josep Call, Marina Scheumann
Spatial transposition tasks assess individuals' ability to represent nonvisible spatial object displacements. Several nonhuman mammal species have been tested on this task including primates, cats, and dogs, but to date, great apes seem the only taxon that has repeatedly and consistently solved spatial transposition tasks. The authors investigated the ability of captive sloth and sun bears to solve spatial transposition tasks. Both species belong to the same taxonomic group as cats and dogs, but unlike them and similar to apes, they have an omnivorous diet that requires them to keep track of fruit sources in space and time...
June 26, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333487/adaptation-of-the-arizona-cognitive-task-battery-for-use-with-the-ts65dn-mouse-model-mus-musculus-of-down-syndrome
#8
Michael R Hunsaker, Genevieve K Smith, Raymond P Kesner
We propose and validate a clear strategy to efficiently and comprehensively characterize neurobehavioral deficits in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome. This novel approach uses neurocognitive theory to design and select behavioral tasks that test specific hypotheses concerning the results of Down syndrome. In this article, we model the Arizona Cognitive Task Battery, used to study human populations with Down syndrome, in Ts65Dn mice. We observed specific deficits for spatial memory, impaired long-term memory for visual objects, acquisition and reversal of motor responses, reduced motor dexterity, and impaired adaptive function as measured by nesting and anxiety tasks...
August 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333486/transitive-inference-in-humans-homo-sapiens-and-rhesus-macaques-macaca-mulatta-after-massed-training-of-the-last-two-list-items
#9
Greg Jensen, Yelda Alkan, Fabian Muñoz, Vincent P Ferrera, Herbert S Terrace
Transitive inference (TI) is a classic learning paradigm for which the relative contributions of experienced rewards and representation-based inference have been debated vigorously, particularly regarding the notion that animals are capable of logic and reasoning. Rhesus macaque subjects and human participants performed a TI task in which, prior to learning a 7-item list (ABCDEFG), a block of trials presented exclusively the pair FG. Contrary to the expectation of associative models, the high prior rate of reward for F did not disrupt subsequent learning of the entire list...
August 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28541056/visible-spatial-contiguity-of-social-information-and-reward-affects-social-learning-in-brown-capuchins-sapajus-apella-and-children-homo-sapiens
#10
Lara A Wood, Andrew Whiten
Animal social learning is typically studied experimentally by the presentation of artificial foraging tasks. Although productive, results are often variable even for the same species. We present and test the hypothesis that one cause of variation is that spatial distance between rewards and the means of reward release causes conflicts for participants' attentional focus. We investigated whether spatial contiguity between a visible reward and the means of release would affect behavioral responses that evidence social learning, testing 21 brown capuchins (Sapajus apella), a much-studied species with variant evidence for social learning, and one hundred eighty 2- to 4-year-old human children (Homo sapiens), a benchmark species known for a strong social learning disposition...
May 25, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28517942/cognitive-bias-and-paw-preference-in-the-domestic-dog-canis-familiaris
#11
Deborah L Wells, Peter G Hepper, Adam D S Milligan, Shanis Barnard
Limb use, an indicator of hemispheric functioning, may be a useful predictor of cognitive bias and hence vulnerability to welfare risk. The relationship between cognitive bias and motor asymmetry, however, has been subject to little investigation. This study explored the association between motor asymmetry and cognitive bias in the domestic dog, a species that displays lateral bias in the form of paw preferences and exhibits positive and negative affective states. Thirty pet dogs had their paw preferences assessed using the Kong ball test...
May 18, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28481567/do-pigeons-columba-livia-use-information-about-the-absence-of-food-appropriately-a-further-look-into-suboptimal-choice
#12
Inês Fortes, Armando Machado, Marco Vasconcelos
In the natural environment, when an animal encounters a stimulus that signals the absence of food-a 'bad-news' stimulus-it will most likely redirect its search to another patch or prey. Because the animal does not pay the opportunity cost of waiting in the presence of a bad-news stimulus, the properties of the stimulus (e.g., its duration and probability) may have little impact in the evolution of the decision processes deployed in these circumstances. Hence, in the laboratory, when animals are forced to experience a bad-news stimulus they seem to ignore its duration, even though they pay the cost of waiting...
May 8, 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28493759/-characterizing-autism-relevant-social-behavior-in-poodles-canis-familiaris-via-owner-report-correction-to-zamzow-et-al-2017
#13
(no author information available yet)
Reports an error in "Characterizing Autism-Relevant Social Behavior in Poodles via Owner Report" by Rachel M. Zamzow, Lisa Lit, Shelley Hamilton and David Q. Beversdorf (Journal of Comparative Psychology, Advanced Online Publication, Mar 13, 2017, np). In the article, the scientific name for the species was missing in the title. All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2017-11247-001.) Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in social communication and the presence of restricted, repetitive behaviors...
May 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318292/from-play-to-proficiency-the-ontogeny-of-stone-tool-use-in-coastal-foraging-long-tailed-macaques-macaca-fascicularis-from-a-comparative-perception-action-perspective
#14
Amanda W Y Tan
Macaques crack shellfish in coastal environments with specialized stone-hammering techniques. I provide the first examination of skill development from 866 object-manipulation and 7,400 tool-use bouts, collected over 15 months, using longitudinal analyses of infants' object manipulation (N = 7) and cross-sectional comparisons of manipulative and tool-use behavior (N = 69). I adopt a Perception-action approach, examining how the emergence of actions on objects relate to the spatial-relational and percussive challenges of tool use...
May 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318291/consistent-individual-differences-in-standard-exploration-tasks-in-the-black-rat-rattus-rattus
#15
Barbora Žampachová, Barbora Kaftanová, Hana Šimánková, Eva Landová, Daniel Frynta
In a fluctuating environment, the optimal level of exploratory behavior depends on the proportion of current risks and benefits. The exploratory behavior is, therefore, often subjected to heterogenous selection. In populations of commensal rodents living in close proximity of humans, this pressure is further increased by pest management. We hypothesize that the black rat (Rattus rattus) responds to this pressure by either high behavioral flexibility or by development of personality types. The aim of this study was to analyze exploratory behavior and boldness of wild black rats and its changes over time to determine whether exploratory behavior is a personality trait in black rats...
May 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28301172/myrmica-rubra-ants-are-more-communicative-when-young-do-they-need-experience
#16
Natalia V Atsarkina, Sofia N Panteleeva, Zhanna I Reznikova
The role of experience in the development of communication in animals is a matter of special interest to many ethologists and psychologists. Ants are known to possess sophisticated and flexible communication systems based mainly on their antennal movements (Reznikova & Ryabko, 2011). However, it is still enigmatic whether young ants need stimulation performances by adults to develop their communication capacities. Experiments with pairwise interactions of Myrmica rubra ants revealed significant differences in individual behavior and the mode of communication in callow (newly emerged) and adult workers...
May 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28287754/characterizing-autism-relevant-social-behavior-in-poodles-canis-familiaris-via-owner-report
#17
Rachel M Zamzow, Lisa Lit, Shelley Hamilton, David Q Beversdorf
[Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 131(2) of Journal of Comparative Psychology (see record 2017-20237-001). In the article, the scientific name for the species was missing in the title. All versions of this article have been corrected.] Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in social communication and the presence of restricted, repetitive behaviors. It can be difficult to model the complex behavioral features of this disorder with rodent models, which have limited similarity to human behaviors...
May 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28277720/artificial-grammar-learning-in-tamarins-saguinus-oedipus-in-varying-stimulus-contexts
#18
Julie J Neiworth, Justin M London, Michael J Flynn, Deborah D Rupert, Owen Alldritt, Caleb Hyde
The human ability to detect regularities in sound sequences is a fundamental substrate of our language faculty. However, is this an ability exclusive to human language processing, or have we usurped a more general learning mechanism for this purpose, one shared with other species? The current study is an attempt to replicate and extend Hauser, Weiss, and Marcus's (2002) retracted study (2010) of artificial grammar learning in tamarins to determine if tamarins can detect an underlying grammatical structure in a pattern of sounds...
May 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28277719/stick-weaving-innovative-behavior-in-tamarins-saguinus-oedipus
#19
Charles T Snowdon, Thomas R Roskos
Some captive cotton-top tamarins spontaneously weave sticks in the mesh of their enclosures so that the stick is lodged between two mesh openings. Sticks are broken from natural branches placed in the enclosures and often modified by biting them in the center before weaving through the mesh. To investigate this further, we systematically surveyed all animals in our colony and found that all successful stick-weaving tamarins were descendants from only 2 of the 16 breeding groups contributing to the colony membership at the time of surveying or were the mates of these descendants, suggesting stick-weaving is a socially learned behavior...
May 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28277718/environmental-enrichment-of-young-adult-rats-rattus-norvegicus-in-different-sensory-modalities-has-long-lasting-effects-on-their-ability-to-learn-via-specific-sensory-channels
#20
Vassilissa Dolivo, Michael Taborsky
Sensory modalities individuals use to obtain information from the environment differ among conspecifics. The relative contributions of genetic divergence and environmental plasticity to this variance remain yet unclear. Numerous studies have shown that specific sensory enrichments or impoverishments at the postnatal stage can shape neural development, with potential lifelong effects. For species capable of adjusting to novel environments, specific sensory stimulation at a later life stage could also induce specific long-lasting behavioral effects...
May 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
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