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Journal of Comparative Psychology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182489/do-capuchin-monkeys-sapajus-apella-prefer-symmetrical-face-shapes
#1
Annika Paukner, Lauren J Wooddell, Carmen E Lefevre, Eric Lonsdorf, Elizabeth Lonsdorf
In humans, facial symmetry has been linked to an individual's genetic quality, and facial symmetry has a small yet significant effect on ratings of facial attractiveness. The same evolutionary processes underlying these phenomena may also convey a selective advantage to symmetrical individuals of other primate species, yet to date, few studies have examined sensitivity to facial symmetry in nonhuman primates. Here we presented images of symmetrical and asymmetrical human and monkey faces to tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus apella) and hypothesized that capuchins would visually prefer symmetrical faces of opposite-sex conspecifics...
February 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182488/experimental-evidence-of-contagious-stretching-and-ingroup-bias-in-budgerigars-melopsittacus-undulatus
#2
Andrew C Gallup, Janine Militello, Lexington Swartwood, Serena Sackett
Previous observational research suggests that stretching is contagious in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus). Here we report the first experimental evidence of this response through a reanalysis of a previous experiment testing for contagious yawning in this species. Using a repeated measures design, 16 birds were tested as pairs alongside familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics with and without visual barriers. Our results show that stretching behavior was temporally clustered only when the birds could see one another, corroborating previous observational findings supporting contagion...
February 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182487/exploring-whether-nonhuman-primates-show-a-bias-to-overestimate-dense-quantities
#3
Audrey E Parrish, Brielle T James, Michael J Beran
The density bias, documented within the foraging domain for some monkey species and for human infants, emerges when perceived numerosity is affected by interstimulus distance such that densely arranged food items appear more numerous relative to the same amount of food sparsely arranged. In this study, capuchin monkeys and rhesus monkeys were presented with a computerized relative discrimination task that allowed for the control of stimulus size, interelemental distance, and overall array pattern. The main objective was to determine whether the density bias was a more widespread and general perceptual phenomenon that extends beyond the foraging domain, similar to other numerosity illusions and biases...
February 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182486/personality-dimensions-of-the-captive-california-sea-lion-zalophus-californianus
#4
Lillian E Ciardelli, Alexander Weiss, David M Powell, Diana Reiss
Although the field of animal personality research is growing, information on sea lion personality is lacking. This is surprising as sea lions are charismatic, cognitively advanced, and relatively accessible for research. In addition, their presence in captivity and frequent interactions with humans allow for them to be closely observed in various contexts. These interactions provide a valuable and unique opportunity to assess dimensions of their personality. This study created a personality survey for captive California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) using a 3-step approach that balances comprehensiveness and comparability to other species...
February 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182485/-wolves-canis-lupus-and-dogs-canis-familiaris-differ-in-following-human-gaze-into-distant-space-but-respond-similar-to-their-packmates-gaze-correction-to-werhahn-et-al-2016
#5
(no author information available yet)
Reports an error in "Wolves (Canis lupus) and dogs (Canis familiaris) differ in following human gaze into distant space but respond similar to their packmates' gaze" by Geraldine Werhahn, Zsófia Virányi, Gabriela Barrera, Andrea Sommese and Friederike Range (Journal of Comparative Psychology, 2016[Aug], Vol 130[3], 288-298). In the article, the affiliations for the second and fifth authors should be Wolf Science Center, Ernstbrunn, Austria, and Comparative Cognition, Messerli Research Institute, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna/ Medical University of Vienna/University of Vienna...
February 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182484/discrimination-of-emotional-facial-expressions-by-tufted-capuchin-monkeys-sapajus-apella
#6
Sarah E Calcutt, Taylor L Rubin, Jennifer J Pokorny, Frans B M de Waal
Tufted or brown capuchin monkeys (Sapajus apella) have been shown to recognize conspecific faces as well as categorize them according to group membership. Little is known, though, about their capacity to differentiate between emotionally charged facial expressions or whether facial expressions are processed as a collection of features or configurally (i.e., as a whole). In 3 experiments, we examined whether tufted capuchins (a) differentiate photographs of neutral faces from either affiliative or agonistic expressions, (b) use relevant facial features to make such choices or view the expression as a whole, and (c) demonstrate an inversion effect for facial expressions suggestive of configural processing...
February 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182483/characterization-of-vocalizations-emitted-in-isolation-by-california-mouse-peromyscus-californicus-pups-throughout-the-postnatal-period
#7
Sarah A Johnson, Michele S Painter, Angela B Javurek, Claire R Murphy, Emily C Howald, Zoya Z Khan, Caroline M Conard, Kristal L Gant, Mark R Ellersieck, Frauke Hoffmann, A Katrin Schenk, Cheryl S Rosenfeld
Rodent species, such as monogamous and biparental California mice, produce vocalizations as a means of communication. A temporal examination of vocalizations produced by California mice pups in isolation was performed. Pup recordings were performed for 3 min at ∼10.00 and 14.00 hrs on early postnatal days (PND) 2-4, 7, 21, and 28. Once initial recordings were finished, pups were returned to the home cage with parents and any siblings for 5 minutes to determine if active biparental responses resulted in an enhanced vocalization response when pups were isolated and retested...
February 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182482/the-attribution-of-navigational-and-goal-directed-agency-in-dogs-canis-familiaris-and-human-toddlers-homo-sapiens
#8
Tibor Tauzin, Andor Csík, Kata Lovas, György Gergely, József Topál
Both human infants and nonhuman primates can recognize unfamiliar entities as instrumental agents ascribing to them goals and efficiency of goal-pursuit. This competence relies on movement cues indicating distal sensitivity to the environment and choice of efficient goal-approach. Although dogs' evolved sensitivity to social cues allow them to recognize humans as communicative agents, it remains unclear whether they have also evolved a basic concept of instrumental agency. We used a preferential object-choice procedure to test whether adult pet dogs and human toddlers can identify unfamiliar entities as agents based on different types of movement cues that specify different levels of agency...
February 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080077/dogs-canis-familiaris-attention-to-human-perception-influence-of-breed-groups-and-life-experiences
#9
Marianne T E Heberlein, Dennis C Turner, Marta B Manser
Attending to the perception of others may help individuals gaining information from conspecifics, or help in competitive situations. Dogs (Canis familiaris) are attentive to humans' signals and their attentional state. We investigated whether dogs of different breed groups differ in their ability to pay attention to human's perception, first according to the genetic relatedness between dog breeds, and second according to working style differences. Once dogs had learned to leave forbidden food on the floor, they were confronted with 2 food items to which only they had unrestricted visual access...
February 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068122/functions-of-vocalization-in-sociosexual-behaviors-in-rats-rattus-norvegicus-in-a-seminatural-environment
#10
Xi Chu, Eelke Snoeren, Anders Ågmo
Both male and female rats produce vocalizations in the presence of a potential sexual partner. In this study, we evaluated the role of vocalizations in sociosexual behaviors in an ecologically valid procedure. Three males and 4 females were housed in a seminatural environment. In each group, 1 or 2 males and females were devocalized, and the other subjects were sham operated. Sociosexual interactions between males and females were recorded for a period of 1 hr when all 4 females were receptive so that the males had the choice to interact either with vocalizing or with silent females...
February 2017: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27841456/effects-of-acute-corticosterone-treatment-on-male-prairie-voles-microtus-ochrogaster-territorial-aggression-does-not-accompany-induced-social-preference
#11
Dimitri V Blondel, Steven M Phelps
Corticosterone (CORT) is a stress-related steroid hormone found in vertebrates, and is known to interact with behavior. In the socially monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster), acute stress and specifically acute CORT administration have been shown to facilitate male social preference for a familiar female, and this effect has been described as facilitation of the monogamous pair bond. It is possible, however, that the effects of stress on social preference may initially represent a short-term coping strategy...
November 2016: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27841455/orangutans-pongo-abelii-seek-information-about-tool-functionality-in-a-metacognition-tubes-task
#12
Nicholas J Mulcahy
Nonhuman primates appear to engage in metacognition by knowing when they need to search for relevant information for solving the tubes task. The task involves presenting subjects with a number of tubes with only 1 having food hidden inside. Before choosing, subjects look inside the tubes more often when they do not know which 1 contains the food (hidden trials) compared to when they do know this information (visible trials). It is argued, however, that nonmetacognitive general food searching strategies can explain this looking behavior...
November 2016: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27841454/divergent-personality-structures-of-brown-sapajus-apella-and-white-faced-capuchins-cebus-capucinus
#13
Lauren M Robinson, F Blake Morton, Marieke C Gartner, Jane Widness, Annika Paukner, Jennifer L Essler, Sarah F Brosnan, Alexander Weiss
One way to gain insights into personality evolution is by comparing the personality structures of related species. We compared the personality structure of 240 wild white-faced capuchin monkeys to the personality structure of 100 captive brown capuchin monkeys. An ancillary goal was to test the degree to which different personality questionnaires yielded similar personality dimensions. Both species were rated on a common set of 26 antonym pairs. The brown capuchin monkeys were also rated on the 54-item Hominoid Personality Questionnaire...
November 2016: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27599356/non-nutritive-thermotactile-cues-induce-odor-preference-in-infant-mice-mus-musculus
#14
Paul M Meyer, Jeffrey R Alberts
Mouse pups (Mus musculus) placed on the midline of a mesh floor suspended over an empty area bounded by 2 odor fields, 1 containing homecage bedding and the other clean bedding, preferentially selected the homecage area when tested on postnatal day (PD) 5, 10, or 12. PD5 pups given a choice of homecage bedding versus age-matched bedding from another litter showed no discrimination, whereas PD10/12 pups preferred own home odors. To test whether such home orientation can be shaped by experience, pups were placed for 2 hrs on PDs 8 and 9 with either a lactating dam, a nonlactating foster dam or a warm tube bearing 1 of 2 novel odors...
November 2016: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27736107/do-humans-homo-sapiens-and-fish-pterophyllum-scalare-make-similar-numerosity-judgments
#15
Maria Elena Miletto Petrazzini, Christian Agrillo, Véronique Izard, Angelo Bisazza
Numerous studies have shown that many animal species can be trained to discriminate between stimuli differing in numerosity. However, in the absence of generalization tests with untrained numerosities, what decision criterion was used by subjects remains unclear: the subjects may succeed by selecting a specific number of items (a criterion over absolute numerosities), or by applying a more general relative numerosity rule, for example, selecting the larger/smaller quantity of items. The latter case may require more powerful representations, supporting judgments of order ("more/less") beyond simple "same/different" judgments, but a relative numerosity rule may also be more adaptive...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27709968/experimenter-expectancy-bias-does-not-explain-eurasian-jays-garrulus-glandarius-performance-in-a-desire-state-attribution-task
#16
Ljerka Ostojić, Edward W Legg, Arne Dits, Natalie Williams, Katharina F Brecht, Michael Mendl, Nicola S Clayton
Male Eurasian jays have been found to adjust the type of food they share with their female partner after seeing her eat 1 type of food to satiety. One interpretation of this behavior is that the male encoded the female's decreased desire for the food she was sated on, and adjusted his behavior accordingly. However, in these studies, the male's actions were scored by experimenters who knew on which food the female was sated. Thus, it is possible that the experimenters' expectations (subconsciously) affected their behavior during tests that, in turn, inadvertently could have influenced the males' actions...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27690504/the-role-of-past-interactions-in-great-apes-communication-about-absent-entities
#17
Manuel Bohn, Josep Call, Michael Tomasello
Recent evidence suggests that great apes can use the former location of an entity to communicate about it. In this study we built on these findings to investigate the social-cognitive foundations of great apes' communicative abilities. We tested whether great apes (n = 35) would adjust their requests for absent entities to previous interactions they had with their interlocutor. We manipulated the apes' experience with respect to the interlocutor's knowledge about the previous content of the now-empty location as well as their experience with the interlocutor's competence to provide additional food items...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27732014/female-directed-violence-as-a-form-of-sexual-coercion-in-humans-homo-sapiens
#18
Nicole Barbaro, Todd K Shackelford
Male-perpetrated female-directed violence (FDV) may be associated with greater sexual access to a female. Accordingly, FDV is expected to be associated with greater copulation frequency. Research on nonhuman primates affirms this hypothesis, but no previous research has investigated this relationship in humans (Homo sapiens). The current research tests the hypothesis that FDV is associated with in-pair copulation frequency and, thus, may function as a form of sexual coercion. It was predicted that men who perpetrate FDV will secure more in-pair copulations than men who do not perpetrate violence (Prediction 1a), and that average monthly rates of FDV would positively correlate with in-pair copulation frequency (Prediction 1b)...
August 15, 2016: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27512821/differences-in-shoaling-behavior-in-two-species-of-freshwater-fish-danio-rerio-and-hyphessobrycon-herbertaxelrodi
#19
Elisabet Gimeno, Vicenç Quera, Francesc S Beltran, Ruth Dolado
Fish can gain significant adaptive advantages when living in a group and they exhibit a wide variety of types of collective motion. The scientific literature recognizes 2 main patterns: shoals (aggregations of individuals that remain close to each other), and schools (aggregations of aligned, or polarized, individuals). We analyzed the collective motion of 2 social fish species, zebrafish (Danio rerio) and black neon tetra (Hyphessobrycon herbertaxelrodi), and compared their patterns of movement and the effect of group size and environmental constraints such as water column height and tank geometry on the collective motion of both species...
August 11, 2016: Journal of Comparative Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27512820/hand-preferences-for-unimanual-and-bimanual-coordinated-actions-in-olive-baboons-papio-anubis-consistency-over-time-and-across-populations
#20
Sandra Molesti, Jacques Vauclair, Adrien Meguerditchian
The reliability of handedness data in nonhuman primates and variations of sample size across studies are critical issues for exploring their potential continuity with humans concerning hemispheric specialization. In this study, we investigated the consistency of handedness for unimanual and bimanual tasks in olive baboons (Papio anubis). For both tasks, we found a consistency of hand preferences over time among subjects retested 5 years later and a consistency of population-level handedness between 2 independent populations...
August 11, 2016: Journal of Comparative Psychology
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