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Literature and Medicine

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27545483/contributors
#1
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27763360/contributors
#2
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27763359/dismemberment-and-the-attempt-at-re-membering-in-r-d-laing-s-i-the-bird-of-paradise-i
#3
Adrian Chapman
Despite renewed interest in the radical psychiatrist R. D. Laing (1927-1989), his The Bird of Paradise (1967), published in a single volume with The Politics of Experience, has received scant scholarly attention. Characterized largely as odd, it has even been read as a sign that Laing, deeply sympathetic to the mad, had himself gone crazy. Eschewing biographical criticism, I focus rather on the problem of assigning Bird to a genre (and the significance of this difficulty). Finding the capacious prose poem genre the most appropriate category, I take Bird seriously as a complex literary text, offer an overview of it, relate it to Politics and 1960s counterculture, and attend to Laing's ambivalent attitude towards writing...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27763358/lydgate-s-i-danse-macabre-i-and-the-trauma-of-the-hundred-years-war
#4
R D Perry
This essay argues that the foundational traumatic lacuna behind John Lydgate's Danse Macabre is the social agon between those who wage the Hundred Years War and those who fight in it. Drawing from the insights of trauma theory to discuss the poem's form, the essay uncovers Lydgate's persistent concern with the damage caused by the war and the concomitant political unrest it causes. It argues further that Lydgate theorized this agon using the emergent genre of tragedy, which is beginning to be practiced anew in late-medieval England...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27763357/cultural-trauma-and-christian-identity-in-the-late-medieval-heroic-epic-i-the-siege-of-jerusalem-i
#5
Patricia A DeMarco
This essay examines scenes of violence in the late medieval poem The Siege of Jerusalem in order to reveal the ways in which trauma is used as the grounds upon which Christian/Jewish difference is established. In particular, I argue that this poem serves as an example of a widespread element in Christian chivalric identity, namely the need to manage the repetitive invocation of Christ's crucifixion (ritually repeated through liturgical and poetic invocation) as a means of asserting both the bodily and psychic integrity of the Christian subject in contrast to the violently abjected figure of the Jewish body...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27763356/introduction-pain-trauma-and-i-philia-i-in-middle-english-literature
#6
Erin Felicia Labbie
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26949212/dismemberment-and-the-attempt-at-re-membering-in-r-d-laing-s-the-bird-of-paradise
#7
Adrian Chapman
Despite renewed interest in the radical psychiatrist R. D. Laing (1927-1989), his The Bird of Paradise (1967), published in a single volume with The Politics of Experience, has received scant scholarly attention. Characterized largely as odd, it has even been read as a sign that Laing, deeply sympathetic to the mad, had himself gone crazy. Eschewing biographical criticism, I focus rather on the problem of assigning Bird to a genre (and the significance of this difficulty). Finding the capacious prose poem genre the most appropriate category, I take Bird seriously as a complex literary text, offer an overview of it, relate it to Politics and 1960s counterculture, and attend to Laing's ambivalent attitude towards writing...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26949211/metaphors-unto-themselves-mental-illness-poetics-in-contemporary-chinese-poetry
#8
Birgit Bunzel Linder
Recently, proponents of the critical medical humanities have recommended a more discerning view of the ways in which genres and forms "speak" to and for illness, looking specifically at cultural and historical dimensions and cultural specificities of idioms of distress rather than at transhistorical and transcultural approaches. These two claims for a genre-specific critique and, in this case, a cross-cultural approach, ground my reading of the work of Chinese poets Guo Lusheng (Indexfinger; b. 1948) and Wen Jie (b...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26949210/transculturation-of-madness-the-double-origin-of-lu-xun-s-diary-of-a-madman
#9
Xiaolu Ma
Over the years scholars have examined the allegorical features of the depiction of madness in Lu Xun's "Diary of a Madman," yet to date little research has taken into consideration the intercultural angle embedded in the narrative's intersection of three cultures, namely Russian, Japanese and Chinese. This paper traces the European-Japanese-Sino route of modern neologisms of madness to explore the introduction of such neologisms into the modern Chinese language and how it corresponds with changing patterns of knowledge and power...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26949209/lydgate-s-danse-macabre-and-the-trauma-of-the-hundred-years-war
#10
R D Perry
This essay argues that the foundational traumatic lacuna behind John Lydgate's Danse Macabre is the social agon between those who wage the Hundred Years War and those who fight in it. Drawing from the insights of trauma theory to discuss the poem's form, the essay uncovers Lydgate's persistent concern with the damage caused by the war and the concomitant political unrest it causes. It argues further that Lydgate theorized this agon using the emergent genre of tragedy, which is beginning to be practiced anew in late-medieval England...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26949208/on-the-unruly-power-of-pain-in-middle-english-drama
#11
Susan Nakley
Late medieval culture tends to value pain highly and positively. Accordingly, much medievalist scholarship links pain with fear and emphasizes their usefulness in the period's philosophy, literature, visual art, and drama. Yet, key moments in The York Play of the Crucifixion, The Second Shepherds' Play, and The Tretise of Miraclis Pleyinge trouble the significance of pain and its relationships with punishment and performance; these works admit the unreliability of pain and fear, even as they harness the formidable power pain holds throughout Middle English literature...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26949207/cultural-trauma-and-christian-identity-in-the-late-medieval-heroic-epic-the-siege-of-jerusalem
#12
Patricia A DeMarco
This essay examines scenes of violence in the late medieval poem The Siege of Jerusalem in order to reveal the ways in which trauma is used as the grounds upon which Christian/Jewish difference is established. In particular, I argue that this poem serves as an example of a widespread element in Christian chivalric identity, namely the need to manage the repetitive invocation of Christ's crucifixion (ritually repeated through liturgical and poetic invocation) as a means of asserting both the bodily and psychic integrity of the Christian subject in contrast to the violently abjected figure of the Jewish body...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26949206/wearing-your-heart-on-your-face-reading-lovesickness-and-the-suicidal-impulse-in-chaucer
#13
Rebecca F McNamara
Geoffrey Chaucer frequently depicts the emotions of his characters via the outward physical signs of the body, and he often does so using a discourse that draws on Galenic theories. A striking example of Chaucer's medicalized descriptions of emotion is his adaptation of the suicidal impulse associated with lovesickness. Chaucer reconstructs this motif in "The Knight's Tale" and The Book of the Duchess by altering his sources (Boccaccio, and Froissart and Machaut) to anatomize the emotional body of the suffering knight...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26949205/introduction-pain-trauma-and-philia-in-middle-english-literature
#14
Erin Felicia Labbie
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26095847/autism-and-the-question-of-the-human
#15
Jenny Bergenmar, Hanna Bertilsdotter Rosqvist, Ann-Sofie Lönngren
The article explores how normative notions of emotions and interaction are active in constructions of the categories of "human" and "animal" in different discourses about autism: scientific and autobiographical. In the scientific discourse of autistic emotionality, a deficit perspective of autism is central. The general affective deficit discourse relies on normative discursive notions of "humanity" or "human emotionality." Thus, neurotypicals are produced as real "humans" and neurotypical emotionality as "normal" human emotionality...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26095846/redefining-the-poet-as-healer-valerie-gillies-s-collaborative-role-in-the-edinburgh-marie-curie-hospice-quiet-room-project
#16
Laura Severin
This article examines the poetic contribution of Valerie Gillies, Edinburgh Makar (or poet of the city) from 2005-2008, to the Edinburgh Marie Curie Hospice Quiet Room, a new contemplation space for patients, families, and staff. In collaboration with others, Gillies created a transitional space for the Quiet Room, centered on the display of her sonnet, "A Place Apart." This space functions to comfort visitors to the Quiet Room by relocating them in their surroundings and offering the solace provided by nature and history...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26095845/narratives-of-public-health-in-dickens-s-journalism-the-trouble-with-sanitary-reform
#17
Ralph F Smith
Although Dickens is still known as having been a highly visible supporter of England's well-known nineteenth-century sanitary movement, he became, in fact, deeply troubled by many of this movement's fundamental tenets, as evidenced by journal narratives on fever that he edited and wrote in the mid-nineteenth century. Rather than water and sewer engineering works and a sanitary regime policed by government agencies as envisaged by Edwin Chadwick and other sanitary reformers, Dickens's view by 1855 was that only a massive erasure of the existing social and political systems and their replacement by an utterly new infrastructure would suffice...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26095844/shirley-jackson-s-the-tooth-dentistry-as-horror-the-imagination-as-a-shield
#18
Robert Haas
On her way to a dreaded dental appointment to have an aching tooth pulled, Clara Spencer meets a solicitous stranger, Jim, and by the end of the story runs off with him, in many interpretations to perdition. But since 1) Shirley Jackson (who herself had much dental work and hated it) has suffered from typecasting as a horror writer, 2) dental gas anesthesia protocols of the time as Clara is anticipating could lead to sexual hallucinations, and 3) contemporary literature celebrated escapist fantasy (e.g., the invisible giant rabbit in Harvey), this article proposes instead that Jim is Clara's own imaginative, comforting, therapeutic creation...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26095843/a-narrative-of-fear-advice-to-mothers
#19
Berit Åström
Taking present-day research into so-called new momism and intense mothering as a starting point, this article argues that the current mothering discourse, rather than articulating a new phenomenon, perpetuates a regulative discourse developed in the nineteenth century, in advice books written by medical doctors for pregnant women and new mothers. Both the Victorian and the present-day texts play on feelings of guilt and inadequacy in order to control the actions and emotions of mothers, although the threatened outcome differs: present-day mothers are warned that their children may become obese or develop neuropsychological disorders, whereas Victorian mothers are warned that their children might die...
2015: Literature and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26095842/the-body-gender-and-biotechnology-in-jeanette-winterson-s-i-the-stone-gods-i
#20
Luna Dolezal
In this article, I will argue that Winterson's use of satire and the common tropes of science fiction in her 2007 novel The Stone Gods provides an effective and important critique of the gender discrepancies arising in the implementation of aesthetic medical biotechnologies under the logic of neoliberal consumerism. In particular, engaging with aspects of Winterson's fictional landscape in Part 1 of The Stone Gods, I will explore the themes of bodily normalization, the medicalization of youth and appearance, and the notion that biotechnologies such as cosmetic surgery can inculcate happiness through some sort of "psychological cure...
2015: Literature and Medicine
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