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Journal of Psychosocial Oncology

Inês A Trindade, Cláudia Ferreira, Margarida Borrego, Andreia Ponte, Carolina Carvalho, José Pinto-Gouveia
BACKGROUND: Recent studies have highlighted the importance of being able to receive compassion and affiliative signals from others. The main aim of the present study was to explore whether social support and fear of receiving compassion from others are predictors of depression symptoms in a sample of breast cancer patients. METHODS: The sample included 86 female patients with non-metastatic breast cancer. Participants were recruited at a Radiotherapy Service in central Portugal and completed validated self-report instruments...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Nuria Rossell, Carmen Salaverria, Angelica Hernandez, Soad Alabi, Roberto Vasquez, Miguel Bonilla, Catherine G Lam, Raul Ribeiro, Ria Reis
OBJECTIVE: In order to reduce nonadherence and treatment abandonment of children with cancer in El Salvador, institutions located nearby the patients' homes were involved to provide support. Methodological approach: Health clinics and municipality offices in the patients' communities were asked to assist families who were not promptly located after missing hospital appointments, or those whose financial limitations were likely to impede continuation of treatment. Data was collected about the number of contacted institutions, the nature of help provided, staff's time investments, and parents' perceptions about the intervention...
February 16, 2018: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Fiona Schulte, Amanda Wurz, K Brooke Russell, Kathleen Reynolds, Douglas Strother, Deborah Dewey
PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between repressive adaptive style and self-reports of social adjustment in survivors of pediatric cancer compared to their siblings. We hypothesized that there would be a greater proportion of repressors among survivors of pediatric cancer compared to siblings, and that repressive adaptive style would be significantly associated with more positive self-reports of social adjustment. METHODS: We utilized a cross-sectional approach...
February 16, 2018: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
James I Gerhart, Yasmin Asvat, Teresa A Lillis, Henry Fung, Johanna Grosse, Stevan E Hobfoll
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: Social support and its relationship to psychological distress are of interest in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) as patients are dependent on caregivers pre-, during, and posttransplant. Although social support is critical for managing stress and trauma, posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) may erode social support and evoke conflict and abandonment within the support system. This study aimed to evaluate whether PTSS were associated with lower support and social conflict in a sample of patients undergoing HSCT...
February 9, 2018: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Kendall L Umstead, Sarah S Kalia, Anne C Madeo, Lori H Erby, Thomas O Blank, Kala Visvanathan, Debra L Roter
PURPOSE: The objective was to explore the relationships among cognitive appraisals of prostate cancer (challenge, threat, and harm/loss), social comparisons, and quality of life in men previously diagnosed. Design, Sample, & Methods: Men who had participated in prostate cancer support groups completed a cross-sectional questionnaire (N = 189). Multivariable linear regression was used to evaluate social comparisons as mediators of quality of life while controlling for uncertainty and optimism...
February 9, 2018: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Sara E Appleyard, Chris Clarke
Cancer is predominantly an illness affecting older people, yet there is a higher risk of under-treated pain in this age group. Many older people are required to self-manage their cancer pain at home but this is currently an under-researched and poorly understood area. We explored the experiences of older adults who self-manage cancer pain at home using an Interpretative Phenomenological Analytic approach. Eight older adults (aged 72-85 years) were recruited from a hospital in the United Kingdom and interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire...
February 1, 2018: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Susan M Pfeiffer, Amanda D Hutchinson
Academic decline has been reported in children after cancer treatment, believed to be as a result of cognitive impairment. Cognitive interventions may improve both the present and future outcomes for children after cancer treatment by improving cognitive and/or academic performance. This review aimed to examine the efficacy of cognitive interventions in children who had received cancer treatment. A systematic search of the PsycInfo and PubMed databases was conducted in May 2015 to identify studies in which cognitive interventions were conducted with children who had undergone cancer treatment and were under the age of 21...
January 16, 2018: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Nadine Köhle, Constance H C Drossaert, Cornelia F Van Uden-Kraan, Karlein M G Schreurs, Mariët Hagedoorn, Irma M Verdonck-de Leeuw, Ernst T Bohlmeijer
This study examined partners of cancer patients intention to use a web-based psychological intervention, their preferences regarding its preconditions, functionalities and topics, and factors related to their intention. One hundred and sixty-eight partners completed a questionnaire about these aspects. Forty-eight percent of the partners would (maybe) make use of a web-based intervention. Partners who intended to participate were significantly younger, used the Internet more often, and perceived more caregiver strain...
January 16, 2018: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Kelly A Hyland, Jamie M Jacobs, Inga T Lennes, William F Pirl, Elyse R Park
PURPOSE: Engaging in positive health behaviors post-treatment is important for cancer survivors' health. However, little is known about whether survivors are practicing health promoting behaviors. We aimed to explore whether survivors are meeting the recent health behavior guidelines set forth by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and to examine associations between health behaviors and distress. METHODS: Sixty-six survivors completed a cross-sectional questionnaire assessing health behaviors prior to an initial appointment at a survivorship care clinic...
January 2018: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Brad Zebrack, Karen Kayser, Julianne Oktay, Laura Sundstrom, Alison Mayer Sachs
In 2014, the Association for Oncology Social Work (AOSW) established A Project to Assure Quality Cancer Care (APAQCC), a group of oncology social workers representing sixty-five Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited cancer programs across the US (including two in Canada). Its aims were (1) to examine the capacity of cancer programs to provide quality psychosocial support services, and (2) to evaluate the implementation of distress screening. The purpose of this paper is to describe how this collaborative research program was created and implemented under the auspices of AOSW, and to report on its impact on the oncology social workers who participated...
January 2018: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Shirley Otis-Green
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2018: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2017: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Michelle Lycke, Tessa Lefebvre, Lies Pottel, Hans Pottel, Lore Ketelaars, Karin Stellamans, Koen Van Eygen, Philippe Vergauwe, Patrick Werbrouck, Laurence Goethals, Patricia Schofield, Tom Boterberg, Philip R Debruyne
OBJECTIVES: Research has indicated that cancer-related cognitive impairments (CRCI) may be influenced by psychosocial factors such as distress, worry and fatigue. Therefore, we aimed to validate the distress thermometer (DT) as a screening tool to detect CRCI six months post-treatment-initiation in a group of general cancer patients. METHODS: Patients (≥18 years, n = 125) with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of a solid cancer or hematological malignancy, scheduled for a curative treatment, were evaluated at baseline (T0) and six months post-treatment-initiation (T1) for CRCI by a neuropsychological assessment, including patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs)...
November 2017: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Rebecca A Campo, Lisa M Wu, Jane Austin, Heiddis Valdimarsdottir, Christine Rini
This longitudinal study examined whether post-transplant cancer survivors (N = 254, 9 months to 3 years after stem cell transplant treatment) with greater personal resilience resources demonstrated better psychological outcomes and whether this could be attributed to reductions in depressive symptoms and/or four meaning-making processes (searching for and finding reasons for one's illness; searching for and finding benefit from illness). Hierarchical linear regression analyses examined associations of survivors' baseline personal resilience resources (composite variable of self-esteem, mastery, and optimism), which occurred an average of 1...
November 2017: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Ilgın Gökler-Danışman, Merve Yalçınay-İnan, İbrahim Yiğit
Diagnosis of cancer leads to multiple losses, all with the potential to initiate grief reactions in patients. The present study aims to contribute to the understanding of the experience of grief by patients with cancer in relation to perceptions of illness, with a focus on the mediating roles of identity centrality, stigma-induced discrimination, and hopefulness. The analyses indicated that these factors functioned as significant partial mediators. The results have implications in terms of supporting patients through the grieving process by working on the meaning of the illness for their identity and improving psychosocial environments to minimize discrimination and facilitate hope...
November 2017: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Maria Cusinato, Vincenzo Calvo, Gianni Bisogno, Elisabetta Viscardi, Marta Pillon, Enrico Opocher, Giuseppe Basso, Maria Montanaro
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of childhood cancer on parents' adult attachment, social support, marital adjustment, anxiety, and depression. METHODS: 30 parents of children with childhood cancer and 30 matched controls completed the following questionnaires: Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised, Dyadic Adjustment Scale-4, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - form Y, and Beck Depression Inventory. RESULTS: Parents of children with childhood cancer had a significantly lower dyadic adjustment than controls, and higher levels of insecure-avoidant attachment, state anxiety, and depression...
November 2017: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Ottilia Brown, Veonna Goliath, Dalena R M van Rooyen, Colleen Aldous, Leonard Charles Marais
Communicating the diagnosis of cancer in cross-cultural clinical settings is a complex task. This qualitative research article describes the content and process of informing Zulu patients in South Africa of the diagnosis of cancer, using osteosarcoma as the index diagnosis. We used a descriptive research design with census sampling and focus group interviews. We used an iterative thematic data analysis process and Guba's model of trustworthiness to ensure scientific rigor. Our results reinforced the use of well-accepted strategies for communicating the diagnosis of cancer...
November 2017: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Katherine R Sterba, Jane Zapka, Kent E Armeson, Keisuke Shirai, Amy Buchanan, Terry A Day, Anthony J Alberg
The purpose of this study was to examine the physical and emotional well-being and social support in newly diagnosed head and neck cancer (HNC) patients and caregivers and identify sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral risk factors associated with compromised well-being in patients and caregivers. Newly diagnosed HNC patients and their primary caregivers (N = 72 dyads) completed questionnaires before treatment assessing physical and mental well-being, depression, cancer worry, and open-ended support questions...
November 2017: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Hasida Ben-Zur, Siwar Makhoul Khoury
OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to explore the adjustment of Jewish and Arab mothers of children diagnosed with cancer. METHOD: Ninety-seven Jewish and 100 Arab mothers completed questionnaires assessing mastery, social support, and adjustment (psychological distress, quality of life, and future fears and hopes). RESULTS: Arab mothers were higher than Jewish mothers on distress and lower on social support and future hopes). Mastery and social support contributed independently to adjustment indices...
November 2017: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
Saeed Pahlevan Sharif, Jasmine Khanekharab
This study aimed to investigate the mediating role of coping strategies in the relationship between external locus of control and quality of life among breast cancer patients. A convenience sample of 130 Malaysian breast cancer patients participated in this study. Using a multiple mediation model analysis, we found a negative relationship between powerful others and patients' quality of life and the mediation of active-emotional coping between powerful others and quality of life. The findings indicated the need for early, targeted psychological interventions seeking to encourage externally oriented cancer patients to use more active emotional coping strategies as it may improve their quality of life...
November 2017: Journal of Psychosocial Oncology
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