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Annual Review of Immunology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29400999/the-formation-and-function-of-granulomas
#1
Antonio J Pagán, Lalita Ramakrishnan
Granulomas are organized aggregates of macrophages, often with characteristic morphological changes, and other immune cells. These evolutionarily ancient structures form in response to persistent particulate stimuli-infectious or noninfectious-that individual macrophages cannot eradicate. Granulomas evolved as protective responses to destroy or sequester particles but are frequently pathological in the context of foreign bodies, infections, and inflammatory diseases. We summarize recent findings that suggest that the granulomatous response unfolds in a stepwise program characterized by a series of macrophage activations and transformations that in turn recruit additional cells and produce structural changes...
February 5, 2018: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29400998/apoptosis-and-clearance-of-apoptotic-cells
#2
Shigekazu Nagata
The human body generates 10-100 billion cells every day, and the same number of cells die to maintain homeostasis in our body. Cells infected by bacteria or viruses also die. The cell death that occurs under physiological conditions mainly proceeds by apoptosis, which is a noninflammatory, or silent, process, while pathogen infection induces necroptosis or pyroptosis, which activates the immune system and causes inflammation. Dead cells generated by apoptosis are quickly engulfed by macrophages for degradation...
February 5, 2018: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29394121/genetics-of-natural-killer-cells-in-human-health-disease-and-survival
#3
Peter Parham, Lisbeth A Guethlein
Natural killer (NK) cells have vital functions in human immunity and reproduction. In the innate and adaptive immune responses to infection, particularly by viruses, NK cells respond by secreting inflammatory cytokines and killing infected cells. In reproduction, NK cells are critical for genesis of the placenta, the organ that controls the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the growing fetus. Controlling NK cell functions are interactions of HLA class I with inhibitory NK cell receptors. First evolved was the conserved interaction of HLA-E with CD94:NKG2A; later established were diverse interactions of HLA-A, -B, -C with killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors...
February 2, 2018: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29400984/antigen-presentation-by-extracellular-vesicles-from-professional-antigen-presenting-cells
#4
Marthe F S Lindenbergh, Willem Stoorvogel
The initiation and maintenance of adaptive immunity require multifaceted modes of communication between different types of immune cells, including direct intercellular contact, secreted soluble signaling molecules, and extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs can be formed as microvesicles directly pinched off from the plasma membrane or as exosomes secreted by multivesicular endosomes. Membrane receptors guide EVs to specific target cells, allowing directional transfer of specific and complex signaling cues. EVs are released by most, if not all, immune cells...
January 31, 2018: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29400985/iga-function-in-relation-to-the-intestinal-microbiota
#5
Andrew J Macpherson, Bahtiyar Yilmaz, Julien P Limenitakis, Stephanie C Ganal-Vonarburg
IgA is the dominant immunoglobulin isotype produced in mammals, largely secreted across the intestinal mucosal surface. Although induction of IgA has been a hallmark feature of microbiota colonization following colonization in germ-free animals, until recently appreciation of the function of IgA in host-microbial mutualism has depended mainly on indirect evidence of alterations in microbiota composition or penetration of microbes in the absence of somatic mutations in IgA (or compensatory IgM). Highly parallel sequencing techniques that enable high-resolution analysis of either microbial consortia or IgA sequence diversity are now giving us new perspectives on selective targeting of microbial taxa and the trajectory of IgA diversification according to induction mechanisms, between different individuals and over time...
January 26, 2018: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29356584/self-reactive-b-cells-in-the-germinal-center-reaction
#6
Robert Brink, Tri Giang Phan
Maintenance of immunological self-tolerance requires lymphocytes carrying self-reactive antigen receptors to be selectively prevented from mounting destructive or inflammatory effector responses. Classically, self-tolerance is viewed in terms of the removal, editing, or silencing of B and T cells that have formed self-reactive antigen receptors during their early development. However, B cells activated by foreign antigen can enter germinal centers (GCs), where they further modify their antigen receptor by somatic hypermutation (SHM) of their immunoglobulin genes...
January 22, 2018: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29345964/immune-response-to-dengue-and-zika
#7
Annie Elong Ngono, Sujan Shresta
Flaviviruses such as dengue (DENV), yellow fever (YFV), West Nile (WNV), and Zika (ZIKV) are human pathogens of global significance. In particular, DENV causes the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral diseases in humans, and ZIKV emerged from obscurity into the spotlight in 2016 as the etiologic agent of congenital Zika syndrome. Owing to the recent emergence of ZIKV as a global pandemic threat, the roles of the immune system during ZIKV infections are as yet unclear. In contrast, decades of DENV research implicate a dual role for the immune system in protection against and pathogenesis of DENV infection...
January 18, 2018: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29328787/immune-responses-to-retroviruses
#8
Asier Saez-Cirion, Nicolas Manel
Retroviruses are genome invaders that have shared a long history of coevolution with vertebrates and their immune system. Found endogenously in genomes as traces of past invasions, retroviruses are also considerable threats to human health when they exist as exogenous viruses such as HIV. The immune response to retroviruses is engaged by germline-encoded sensors of innate immunity that recognize viral components and damage induced by the infection. This response develops with the induction of antiviral effectors and launching of the clonal adaptive immune response, which can contribute to protective immunity...
January 12, 2018: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29328786/connections-between-metabolism-and-epigenetics-in-programming-cellular-differentiation
#9
Danielle A Chisolm, Amy S Weinmann
Researchers are intensifying efforts to understand the mechanisms by which changes in metabolic states influence differentiation programs. An emerging objective is to define how fluctuations in metabolites influence the epigenetic states that contribute to differentiation programs. This is because metabolites such as S-adenosylmethionine, acetyl-CoA, α-ketoglutarate, 2-hydroxyglutarate, and butyrate are donors, substrates, cofactors, and antagonists for the activities of epigenetic-modifying complexes and for epigenetic modifications...
January 12, 2018: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29328785/immune-responses-in-the-liver
#10
Paul Kubes, Craig Jenne
The liver is a key, frontline immune tissue. Ideally positioned to detect pathogens entering the body via the gut, the liver appears designed to detect, capture, and clear bacteria, viruses, and macromolecules. Containing the largest collection of phagocytic cells in the body, this organ is an important barrier between us and the outside world. Importantly, as portal blood also transports a large number of foreign but harmless molecules (e.g., food antigens), the liver's default immune status is anti-inflammatory or immunotolerant; however, under appropriate conditions, the liver is able to mount a rapid and robust immune response...
January 12, 2018: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29261409/cell-biology-of-t-cell-receptor-expression-and-regulation
#11
Andrés Alcover, Balbino Alarcón, Vincenzo Di Bartolo
T cell receptors (TCRs) are protein complexes formed by six different polypeptides. In most T cells, TCRs are composed of αβ subunits displaying immunoglobulin-like variable domains that recognize peptide antigens associated with major histocompatibility complex molecules expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. TCR αβ subunits are associated with the CD3 complex formed by the γ, δ, ε, and ζ subunits, which are invariable and ensure signal transduction. Here, we review how the expression and function of TCR complexes are orchestrated by several fine-tuned cellular processes that encompass (a) synthesis of the subunits and their correct assembly and expression at the plasma membrane as a single functional complex, (b) TCR membrane localization and dynamics at the plasma membrane and in endosomal compartments, (c) TCR signal transduction leading to T cell activation, and (d) TCR degradation...
December 20, 2017: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29237129/zap-70-in-signaling-biology-and-disease
#12
Byron B Au-Yeung, Neel H Shah, Lin Shen, Arthur Weiss
T cells possess an array of functional capabilities important for host defense against pathogens and tumors. T cell effector functions require the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). The TCR has no intrinsic enzymatic activity, and thus signal transduction from the receptor relies on additional signaling molecules. One such molecule is the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase ZAP-70, which associates with the TCR complex and is required for initiating the canonical biochemical signal pathways downstream of the TCR. In this article, we describe recent structure-based insights into the regulation and substrate specificity of ZAP-70, and then we review novel methods for determining the role of ZAP-70 catalytic activity-dependent and -independent signals in developing and mature T cells...
December 13, 2017: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29237128/host-control-of-fungal-infections-lessons-from-basic-studies-and-human-cohorts
#13
Michail S Lionakis, Stuart M Levitz
In the last few decades, the AIDS pandemic and the significant advances in the medical management of individuals with neoplastic and inflammatory conditions have resulted in a dramatic increase in the population of immunosuppressed patients with opportunistic, life-threatening fungal infections. The parallel development of clinically relevant mouse models of fungal disease and the discovery and characterization of several inborn errors of immune-related genes that underlie inherited human susceptibility to opportunistic mycoses have significantly expanded our understanding of the innate and adaptive immune mechanisms that protect against ubiquitous fungal exposures...
December 13, 2017: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29144838/human-t-cell-leukemia-virus-type-1-persistence-and-pathogenesis
#14
Charles R M Bangham
Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), also known as human T lymphotropic virus type 1, was the first exogenous human retrovirus discovered. Unlike the distantly related lentivirus HIV-1, HTLV-1 causes disease in only 5-10% of infected people, depending on their ethnic origin. But whereas HIV-1 infection and the consequent diseases can be efficiently contained in most cases by antiretroviral drug treatment, there is no satisfactory treatment for the malignant or inflammatory diseases caused by HTLV-1...
November 16, 2017: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29144837/evolution-of-alternative-adaptive-immune-systems-in-vertebrates
#15
Thomas Boehm, Masayuki Hirano, Stephen J Holland, Sabyasachi Das, Michael Schorpp, Max D Cooper
Adaptive immunity in jawless fishes is based on antigen recognition by three types of variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) composed of variable leucinerich repeats, which are differentially expressed by two T-like lymphocyte lineages and one B-like lymphocyte lineage. The T-like cells express either VLRAs or VLRCs of yet undefined antigen specificity, whereas the VLRB antibodies secreted by B-like cells bind proteinaceous and carbohydrate antigens. The incomplete VLR germline genes are assembled into functional units by a gene conversion-like mechanism that employs flanking variable leucine-rich repeat sequences as templates in association with lineage-specific expression of cytidine deaminases...
November 16, 2017: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29144836/autophagy-and-inflammation
#16
Yu Matsuzawa-Ishimoto, Seungmin Hwang, Ken Cadwell
The cellular degradative pathway of autophagy has a fundamental role in immunity. Here, we review the function of autophagy and autophagy proteins in inflammation. We discuss how the autophagy machinery controls the burden of infectious agents while simultaneously limiting inflammatory pathologies, which often involves processes that are distinct from conventional autophagy. Among the newly emerging processes we describe are LC3-associated phagocytosis and targeting by autophagy proteins, both of which require many of the same proteins that mediate conventional autophagy...
November 16, 2017: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446063/synthetic-immunology-hacking-immune-cells-to-expand-their-therapeutic-capabilities
#17
REVIEW
Kole T Roybal, Wendell A Lim
The ability of immune cells to survey tissues and sense pathologic insults and deviations makes them a unique platform for interfacing with the body and disease. With the rapid advancement of synthetic biology, we can now engineer and equip immune cells with new sensors and controllable therapeutic response programs to sense and treat diseases that our natural immune system cannot normally handle. Here we review the current state of engineered immune cell therapeutics and their unique capabilities compared to small molecules and biologics...
April 26, 2017: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446062/metabolite-sensing-g-protein-coupled-receptors-facilitators-of-diet-related-immune-regulation
#18
REVIEW
Jian K Tan, Craig McKenzie, Eliana Mariño, Laurence Macia, Charles R Mackay
Nutrition and the gut microbiome regulate many systems, including the immune, metabolic, and nervous systems. We propose that the host responds to deficiency (or sufficiency) of dietary and bacterial metabolites in a dynamic way, to optimize responses and survival. A family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) termed the metabolite-sensing GPCRs bind to various metabolites and transmit signals that are important for proper immune and metabolic functions. Members of this family include GPR43, GPR41, GPR109A, GPR120, GPR40, GPR84, GPR35, and GPR91...
April 26, 2017: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28446061/signaling-by-antibodies-recent-progress
#19
Stylianos Bournazos, Taia T Wang, Rony Dahan, Jad Maamary, Jeffrey V Ravetch
IgG antibodies mediate a diversity of immune functions by coupling of antigen specificity through the Fab domain to signal transduction via Fc-Fc receptor interactions. Indeed, balanced IgG signaling through type I and type II Fc receptors is required for the control of proinflammatory, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory processes. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that govern IgG-Fc receptor interactions, highlighting the diversity of Fc receptor-mediated effector functions that regulate immunity and inflammation as well as determine susceptibility to infection and autoimmunity and responsiveness to antibody-based therapeutics and vaccines...
April 26, 2017: Annual Review of Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28226229/a-perspective-on-the-role-of-computational-models-in-immunology
#20
Arup K Chakraborty
This is an exciting time for immunology because the future promises to be replete with exciting new discoveries that can be translated to improve health and treat disease in novel ways. Immunologists are attempting to answer increasingly complex questions concerning phenomena that range from the genetic, molecular, and cellular scales to that of organs, whole animals or humans, and populations of humans and pathogens. An important goal is to understand how the many different components involved interact with each other within and across these scales for immune responses to emerge, and how aberrant regulation of these processes causes disease...
April 26, 2017: Annual Review of Immunology
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