journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

British Journal of Developmental Psychology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29314168/parenting-differentially-influences-the-development-of-boys-and-girls-inhibitory-control
#1
Ashley R Amicarelli, Yuliya Kotelnikova, Heather J Smith, Katie R Kryski, Elizabeth P Hayden
Effortful control (EC) has important implications for children's development. While both child sex and parenting are related to child EC, and while a literature shows early sex differences in children's responses to care, interactions between care and child sex in predicting EC are not well understood. We therefore examined associations between child sex and early caregiving as predictors of children's development of a specific aspect of EC, inhibitory control (IC). A community sample of 406 three-year-old children and their caregivers completed behavioural tasks and observational measures of parenting and IC, and children were re-assessed for IC at age 5...
January 3, 2018: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29285770/feeling-out-a-link-between-feeling-and-infant-sociomoral-evaluation
#2
Conor M Steckler, Zoe Liberman, Julia W Van de Vondervoort, Janine Slevinsky, Doan T Le, J Kiley Hamlin
Recent research has shown that infants selectively approach prosocial versus antisocial characters, suggesting that foundations of sociomoral development may be present early in life. Despite this, to date, the mental processes involved in infants' prosocial preferences are poorly understood. To explore a possible role of emotions in early social evaluations, the current studies examined whether four samples of infants and toddlers express different emotional reactions after observing prosocial (giving) versus antisocial (taking) events...
December 28, 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29277908/mental-rotation-and-the-human-body-children-s-inflexible-use-of-embodiment-mirrors-that-of-adults
#3
Markus Krüger, Mirjam Ebersbach
Adults' mental rotation performance with body-like stimuli is enhanced if these stimuli are anatomically compatible with a human body, but decreased by anatomically incompatible stimuli. In this study, we investigated these effects for kindergartners and first-graders: When asked to mentally rotate cube configurations attached with human body parts in an anatomically compatible way, allowing for the projection of a human body, children performed better than with pure cube combinations. By contrast, when body parts were attached in an anatomically incompatible way, disallowing the projection of a human body, children performed worse than with pure combinations...
December 25, 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29266313/developmental-effects-of-stimulus-gender-and-the-social-context-in-which-it-appears-on-threat-detection
#4
Omer Horovitz, Irit Lindenfeld, Maya Melamed, Tomer Shechner
This study used a hands-free eye-tracking visual search (VS) task to examine possible developmental differences in target detection. Thirty-two young adults and 27 youth were asked to detect a fearful face (male or female) among a crowd of either neutral or happy faces. Fearful male faces were detected faster than fearful female faces, but only by young adults and only when displayed among neutral faces. Additionally, young adults had shorter scanpath lengths prior to the target detection. Finally, a strong negative correlation emerged between age and detection speed for a male target in a neutral crowd...
December 19, 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29265381/strong-and-strategic-conformity-understanding-by-3-and-5-year-old-children
#5
Laurent Cordonier, Theresa Nettles, Philippe Rochat
'Strong conformity' corresponds to the public endorsement of majority opinions that are in blatant contradiction to one's own correct perceptual judgements of the situation. We tested strong conformity inference by 3- and 5-year-old children using a third-person perspective paradigm. Results show that at neither age, children spontaneously expect that an ostracized third-party individual who wants to affiliate with the majority group will show strong conformity. However, when questioned as to what the ostracized individual should do to befriend others, from 5 years of age children explicitly demonstrate that they construe strong conformity as a strategic means of social affiliation...
December 18, 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29235136/reluctance-to-express-emotion-explains-relation-between-cognitive-distortions-and-social-competence-in-anxious-children
#6
Brandon G Scott, Armando A Pina, Julia H Parker
Guided by social information processing and affective social competence models, the focal objective of this research was to examine the relations among anxious children's cognitive distortions, social skill competence, and reluctance to express emotion. In addition, we explored whether children's attention control played any meaningful role. Using a sample of 111 anxious children (Mage  = 9.63, SD = 0.73; 75.7% girls; 56% Hispanic/Latino), we found that cognitive distortions were negatively related to social competence...
December 12, 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29226463/which-limb-is-it-responses-to-vibrotactile-stimulation-in-early-infancy
#7
Eszter Somogyi, Lisa Jacquey, Tobias Heed, Matej Hoffmann, Jeffrey J Lockman, Lionel Granjon, Jacqueline Fagard, J Kevin O'Regan
This study focuses on how the body schema develops during the first months of life, by investigating infants' motor responses to localized vibrotactile stimulation on their limbs. Vibrotactile stimulation was provided by small buzzers that were attached to the infants' four limbs one at a time. Four age groups were compared cross-sectionally (3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-month-olds). We show that before they actually reach for the buzzer, which, according to previous studies, occurs around 7-8 months of age, infants demonstrate emerging knowledge about their body's configuration by producing specific movement patterns associated with the stimulated body area...
December 11, 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29226486/associations-between-and-development-of-cool-and-hot-executive-functions-across-early-childhood
#8
Sarah O'Toole, Claire P Monks, Stella Tsermentseli
This study explored the development of cool and hot EF skills across early childhood. Children 4.5- to 5.5-years-old (N = 80) completed performance-based assessments of cool EF (inhibition and working memory), hot EF (affective decision-making and delay of gratification) at three time points across 12 months. Cool EF task performance was consistently correlated with early childhood, but hot EF task performance was not. Performance on cool EF tasks showed significant improvements over early childhood, but performance on hot EF tasks did not...
December 10, 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29171059/family-and-individual-variables-associated-with-young-filipino-children-s-numeracy-interest-and-competence
#9
Sum Kwing Cheung, Xiujie Yang, Katrina May Dulay, Catherine McBride
Children's early numeracy outcomes set the foundation for mathematics learning in their future school years. This study examined how different family and individual variables were associated with the numeracy interest and competence of disadvantaged young children in the Philippines. The numeracy and literacy skills of 673 children living in low-middle income communities were tested. Their parents were also asked to complete a questionnaire on demographics, their home numeracy practices, attitudes about numeracy learning, and children's numeracy interest...
November 23, 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29168564/grade-related-differences-in-strategy-use-in-multidigit-division-in-two-instructional-settings
#10
Marian Hickendorff, Joke Torbeyns, Lieven Verschaffel
We aimed to investigate upper elementary children's strategy use in the domain of multidigit division in two instructional settings: the Netherlands and Flanders (Belgium). A cross-sectional sample of 119 Dutch and 122 Flemish fourth to sixth graders solved a varied set of multidigit division problems. With latent class analysis, three distinct strategy profiles were identified: children consistently using number-based strategies, children combining the use of column-based and number-based strategies, and children combining the use of digit-based and number-based strategies...
November 23, 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29159812/the-i-in-autism-severity-and-social-functioning-in-autism-are-related-to-self-processing
#11
Karri Gillespie-Smith, Carrie Ballantyne, Holly P Branigan, David J Turk, Sheila J Cunningham
It is well established that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show impaired understanding of others and deficits within social functioning. However, it is still unknown whether self-processing is related to these impairments and to what extent self impacts social functioning and communication. Using an ownership paradigm, we show that children with ASD and chronological- and verbal-age-matched typically developing (TD) children do show the self-referential effect in memory. In addition, the self-bias was dependent on symptom severity and socio-communicative ability...
November 21, 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29150840/longitudinal-pathways-between-mental-health-difficulties-and-academic-performance-during-middle-childhood-and-early-adolescence
#12
Jessica Deighton, Neil Humphrey, Jay Belsky, Jan Boehnke, Panos Vostanis, Praveetha Patalay
There is a growing appreciation that child functioning in different domains, levels, or systems are interrelated over time. Here, we investigate links between internalizing symptoms, externalizing problems, and academic attainment during middle childhood and early adolescence, drawing on two large data sets (child: mean age 8.7 at enrolment, n = 5,878; adolescent: mean age 11.7, n = 6,388). Using a 2-year cross-lag design, we test three hypotheses - adjustment erosion, academic incompetence, and shared risk - while also examining the moderating influence of gender...
November 18, 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29134669/unique-contribution-of-ecuadorian-kindergartners-spontaneous-focusing-on-numerosity-to-their-early-numerical-abilities
#13
Joke Torbeyns, Gina Bojorque, Jo Van Hoof, Daniël Van Nijlen, Lieven Verschaffel
Recent evidence indicates that young children's spontaneous focusing on numerosity (SFON) uniquely contributes to their early numerical abilities. This study complements previous findings by validating the relation between young children's SFON and their early numerical abilities in a developing country, namely Ecuador. We analysed 355 Ecuadorian 5- to 6-year-olds' SFON in relation to their early numerical abilities at the start of kindergarten, controlling for children's socio-demographic (socio-economic status, age) and general cognitive (working memory, intelligence) characteristics...
November 14, 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29134666/children-s-understanding-of-multiplication-and-division-insights-from-a-pooled-analysis-of-seven-studies-conducted-across-7%C3%A2-years
#14
Adam K Dubé, Katherine M Robinson
Research suggests that children's conceptual understanding of multiplication and division is weak and that it remains poor well into the later elementary school years. Further, children's understanding of fundamental concepts such as inversion and associativity does not improve as they progress from grades 6 to 8. Instead, some children simply possess strong understanding while others do not. Other studies have identified an increase across these grades. The present investigation analyses data from seven studies of Grade 6 (n = 226), Grade 7 (n = 221), and Grade 8 (n = 216) children's three-term problem-solving (e...
November 14, 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28901558/-things-aren-t-so-bad-preschoolers-overpredict-the-emotional-intensity-of-negative-outcomes
#15
Leia Kopp, Cristina M Atance, Sean Pearce
Adults often overpredict the emotional intensity of future events, but little is known about whether this 'intensity bias' is present in early childhood. We asked 48 3- to 5-year-olds to (1) predict and (2) report their emotions concerning two desirable (receiving four stickers, scoring up to two points in a ball toss) and two undesirable (receiving one sticker, scoring no points) outcomes. Children showed the intensity bias by overpredicting how negatively they would feel if they received one sticker, but not for scoring no points...
November 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28833301/level-2-perspectives-computed-quickly-and-spontaneously-evidence-from-eight-to-9-5-year-old-children
#16
Fruzsina Elekes, Máté Varga, Ildikó Király
It has been widely assumed that computing how a scene looks from another perspective (level-2 perspective taking, PT) is an effortful process, as opposed to the automatic capacity of tracking visual access to objects (level-1 PT). Recently, adults have been found to compute both forms of visual perspectives in a quick but context-sensitive way, indicating that the two functions share more features than previously assumed. However, the developmental literature still shows the dissociation between automatic level-1 and effortful level-2 PT...
November 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28792602/infants-preferentially-approach-and-explore-the-unexpected
#17
Zi L Sim, Fei Xu
Looking time experiments based on the violation-of-expectation (VOE) method have consistently demonstrated that infants look longer when their expectations are violated. However, it remains an open question whether similar effects will be observed in infants' approach behaviours. Specifically, do infants selectively approach and explore sources that violate their expectations? In this study, we address this question by examining how infants' looking times are related to their approach and exploration behaviours...
November 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28792070/the-developmental-stability-of-inhibition-from-2-to-5%C3%A2-years
#18
Daniela Kloo, Beate Sodian
Executive functions or cognitive self-regulatory control processes are critical for children's ability to successfully navigate their academic and social environment. In this study, we focused on the development of one critical executive function skill, that of inhibitory control. In a longitudinal study, we tested 96 children at 24, 30, 36, 50, and 60 months of age with age-appropriate measures of inhibition. We found evidence for the developmental stability of inhibitory abilities. Inhibitory control at 30 months of age was strongly related to inhibitory control at 60 months of age even when verbal IQ was partialled out...
November 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28727162/-will-i-want-these-stickers-tomorrow-preschoolers-ability-to-predict-current-and-future-needs
#19
Gema Martin-Ordas
Between 3 and 5 years of age, children develop the ability to plan for their own and others' future needs; however, they have great difficulty predicting future needs that conflict with current ones. Importantly, this ability has only been tested in the domain of physiological states (e.g., thirst). Therefore, it is still an open question whether in a different context preschoolers can disengage from their current needs to secure a different future one. In a Resource Allocation task, 4- and 5-year-olds had to distribute three types of rewards between themselves and another child for either 'right now' or 'tomorrow'...
November 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28722173/the-development-of-non-essentialist-concepts-of-ethnicity-among-children-in-a-multicultural-london-community
#20
Ruth Woods
Ethnic constancy, the belief that a person cannot change ethnicity, is an important component of ethnic essentialism, the conviction that members of ethnic groups share an immutable underlying essence. Most children in previous research viewed ethnicity as increasingly immutable with age. However, some evidence suggests that children growing up in communities, which define ethnicity primarily in terms of changeable features (e.g., lifestyle) rather than fixed features (e.g., ancestry), may not follow this trajectory...
November 2017: British Journal of Developmental Psychology
journal
journal
28636
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"