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Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454786/erratum
#1
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454785/ear-nose-and-throat-emergencies
#2
EDITORIAL
Laura J Bontempo, Jan Shoenberger
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454784/ears-nose-and-throat-emergencies
#3
EDITORIAL
Amal Mattu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454783/infections-of-the-neck
#4
REVIEW
Renjie Michael Li, Michael Kiemeney
Infection of the neck is a relatively common emergency department complaint. If not diagnosed and managed promptly, it may quickly progress to a life-threatening infection. These infections can result in true airway emergencies that may require fiberoptic or surgical airways. This article covers common, as well as rare but emergent, presentations and uses an evidence-based approach to discuss diagnostic and treatment modalities.
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454782/dental-emergencies
#5
REVIEW
Jean M Hammel, Jason Fischel
Dental emergencies present frequently to the emergency department and urgent care centers. Trauma to the teeth includes fractures, luxations, and avulsions, which can be reduced in most cases. Avulsed primary teeth should never be replaced. Mouthguards should be worn in most youth sports to prevent many dental injuries. Dental caries can progress to worsening infection and should be diagnosed and promptly referred. More severe infections may require antibiotics, imaging, or incision and drainage. Dental blocks can assist with analgesia and patient comfort during other procedures...
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454781/infections-of-the-oropharynx
#6
REVIEW
Matthew R Klein
This article reviews the presentation, diagnosis, and management of common and "can't miss" infections of the oropharynx, including streptococcal pharyngitis, infectious mononucleosis, peritonsillar abscess, retropharyngeal abscess, and epiglottitis.
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454780/soft-tissue-disorders-of-the-mouth
#7
REVIEW
Stephanie Diebold, Michael Overbeck
Soft tissue disorders of the mouth encompass a wide expanse of pathophysiology. This article focuses on the identification, etiology, management, and complications of common infectious processes (candidiasis, dental caries, and herpes labialis), inflammatory lesions (sialolithiasis, oral lichen planus, and aphthous ulcer), and benign entities (bony tori and mucocele).
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454779/sinusitis-update
#8
REVIEW
Benjamin Wyler, William K Mallon
Rhinosinusitis affects many pediatric patients as well as 1 in 6 adults in any given year, resulting in ambulatory care, pediatric, and emergency department visits. Uncomplicated rhinosinusitis requires no imaging or testing and does not require antibiotic treatment. Using strict clinical diagnostic criteria may minimize unnecessary antibiotics. When indicated, amoxicillin with or without clavulanate for 5 to 10 days remains the first-line antibiotic, despite increasing incidence of staphylococcal sinusitis in the post-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era...
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454778/epistaxis
#9
REVIEW
Neil Alexander Krulewitz, Megan Leigh Fix
Most anterior epistaxis originates primarily from the Kiesselbach plexus, whereas posterior epistaxis is less common and originates from branches of the sphenopalatine artery. Risk factors include local trauma, foreign body insertion, substance abuse, neoplasms, inherited bleeding diatheses, or acquired coagulopathies. Assessment of airway, breathing, and circulation precedes identification of bleeding source, pain control, and achieving hemostasis. Management options include topical vasoconstrictors, direct pressure, cautery, tranexamic acid, nasal tampons, Foley catheters, or surgical intervention...
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454777/the-diagnosis-and-management-of-facial-bone-fractures
#10
REVIEW
Steve Chukwulebe, Christopher Hogrefe
Appropriate medical care for a patient with a facial fracture can not only optimize aesthetic outcomes but also prevent the potential morbidity and mortality of delayed treatment. In this article, we focus on the clinical presentations, physical examination findings, diagnostic imaging, consultations, and follow-up that patients with facial fractures need related to their emergency department management. Specifically, we address the nuances of evaluating frontal, orbital, nasal, maxillofacial, and mandibular fractures...
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454776/traumatic-injuries-of-the-ear-nose-and-throat
#11
REVIEW
Mac Henry, H Gene Hern
This article reviews the presentation, diagnosis, and management of common traumatic injuries of the ear, nose, and throat, including laryngeal trauma, auricular and septal hematomas, and tympanic membrane rupture.
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454775/foreign-bodies-of-the-ear-nose-and-throat
#12
REVIEW
Leslie C Oyama
Foreign bodies to the ear, nose, and throat often can be managed in the emergency department, particularly if the patient offers a history consistent with foreign body and is calm and compliant with the examination and removal attempts. Tips for success include analgesia, adequate visualization, immobilization of the patient's head, dexterity and experience level of the provider, and minimizing attempts at removal. It is critical to recognize the risks involved with certain retained objects (button batteries or sharp objects) and when to call a consultant to help facilitate safe, successful removal of objects to the ear, nose, and throat...
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454774/peripheral-vertigo
#13
REVIEW
Rodney Omron
This article summarizes the systematic assessment of the dizzy patient who presents with peripheral vertigo. It demonstrates the steps and tests necessary using the Triage-Timing-Trigger-Test (Triage + TiTraTe) method to accurately diagnose the underlying most probable cause while ruling out life-threatening causes. Using video support and just-in-time infographics, it demonstrates the Dix-Hallpike, Semont, Epley, and HINTS maneuvers.
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454773/tracheostomy-emergencies
#14
REVIEW
Laura J Bontempo, Sara L Manning
Tracheostomy is a common procedure for long-term airway management. Although the overall complication rate is greater than 50%, the incidence of serious complications is low. These serious complications can, however, lead to significant morbidity and mortality and it is incumbent on the emergency provider to be prepared to deal with such tracheostomy-related emergencies. The greatest life threats to the tracheostomy patient are decannulation, obstruction, and hemorrhage. Other important but lower-acuity complications include tracheoesophageal fistula formation, tracheal stenosis, infection, and tracheocutaneous fistula formation...
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30454772/infections-of-the-ear
#15
REVIEW
Jacob Szmuilowicz, Randall Young
Infections of the ear are a common presentation to an acute care environment. In this article, the authors aim to summarize the most common presentations, and diagnostic and treatment options for typical infections of the ear. This article is geared toward the emergency physician, urgent care provider, and primary care provider who will likely be the initial evaluating and treating provider to assist them in determining what treatment modalities can be managed in a clinic and what needs to be referred for admission or specialty consultation...
February 2019: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30297012/here-to-stay-infectious-diseases-in-emergency-medicine
#16
EDITORIAL
Stephen Y Liang, Rachel L Chin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2018: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30297011/infectious-disease-emergencies
#17
EDITORIAL
Amal Mattu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2018: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30297010/infection-prevention-for-the-emergency-department-out-of-reach-or-standard-of-care
#18
REVIEW
Stephen Y Liang, Madison Riethman, Josephine Fox
The emergency department (ED) presents unique challenges to infection control and prevention. Hand hygiene, transmission-based precautions, environmental cleaning, high-level disinfection and sterilization of reusable medical devices, and prevention of health care-associated infections (catheter-associated urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, central line-associated bloodstream infection) are key priorities in ED infection prevention. Effective and sustainable infection prevention strategies tailored to the ED are necessary and achievable...
November 2018: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30297009/antimicrobial-stewardship-in-the-emergency-department
#19
REVIEW
Michael Pulia, Robert Redwood, Larissa May
The emergency department (ED) is the hub of the US health care system. Acute infectious diseases are frequently encountered in the ED setting, making this a critical setting for antimicrobial stewardship efforts. Systems level and behavioral stewardship interventions have demonstrated success in the ED setting but successful implementation depends on institutional support and the presence of a physician champion. Antimicrobial stewardship efforts in the ED should target high-impact areas: antibiotic prescribing for nonindicated respiratory tract conditions, such as bronchitis and sinusitis; overtreatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria; and using two antibiotics (double coverage) for uncomplicated cases of cellulitis or abscess...
November 2018: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30297008/infectious-diseases-after-hydrologic-disasters
#20
REVIEW
Stephen Y Liang, Nicole Messenger
Hydrologic disasters, including hurricanes, tsunamis, and severe flooding, have been associated with infectious diseases, particularly among vulnerable and displaced populations in resource-poor settings. Skin and soft tissue infections, gastrointestinal infections, respiratory infections, zoonotic infections, and vector-borne diseases each present unique threats to human health in this setting. Increased emergency physician awareness of these infectious diseases and their diagnosis and management helps optimize medical care for survivors after a hydrologic disaster and safeguard the health of disaster responders...
November 2018: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
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