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Brain and Cognition

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28926752/response-bias-and-response-monitoring-evidence-from-healthy-older-adults-and-patients-with-mild-alzheimer-s-disease
#1
Rebecca G Deason, Michelle J Tat, Sean Flannery, Prabhakar S Mithal, Erin P Hussey, Eileen T Crehan, Brandon A Ally, Andrew E Budson
Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) often exhibit an abnormally liberal response bias in recognition memory tests, responding "old" more frequently than "new." Investigations have shown patients can to shift to a more conservative response bias when given instructions. We examined if patients with mild AD could alter their response patterns when the ratio of old items is manipulated without explicit instruction. Healthy older adults and AD patients studied lists of words and then were tested in three old/new ratio conditions (30%, 50%, or 70% old items)...
September 16, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28923763/hemispheric-specialization-for-global-and-local-processing-a-direct-comparison-of-linguistic-and-non-linguistic-stimuli
#2
Sanne G Brederoo, Mark R Nieuwenstein, Monicque M Lorist, Frans W Cornelissen
It is often assumed that the human brain processes the global and local properties of visual stimuli in a lateralized fashion, with a left hemisphere (LH) specialization for local detail, and a right hemisphere (RH) specialization for global form. However, the evidence for such global-local lateralization stems predominantly from studies using linguistic stimuli, the processing of which has shown to be LH lateralized in itself. In addition, some studies have reported a reversal of global-local lateralization when using non-linguistic stimuli...
September 15, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28899576/neuroscience-and-everyday-life-facing-the-translation-problem
#3
Jolien C Francken, Marc Slors
To enable the impact of neuroscientific insights on our daily lives, careful translation of research findings is required. However, neuroscientific terminology and common-sense concepts are often hard to square. For example, when neuroscientists study lying to allow the use of brain scans for lie-detection purposes, the concept of lying in the scientific case differs considerably from the concept in court. Furthermore, lying and other cognitive concepts are used unsystematically and have an indirect and divergent mapping onto brain activity...
September 10, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28898720/not-so-secret-agents-event-related-potentials-to-semantic-roles-in-visual-event-comprehension
#4
Neil Cohn, Martin Paczynski, Marta Kutas
Research across domains has suggested that agents, the doers of actions, have a processing advantage over patients, the receivers of actions. We hypothesized that agents as "event builders" for discrete actions (e.g., throwing a ball, punching) build on cues embedded in their preparatory postures (e.g., reaching back an arm to throw or punch) that lead to (predictable) culminating actions, and that these cues afford frontloading of event structure processing. To test this hypothesis, we compared event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to averbal comic panels depicting preparatory agents (ex...
September 9, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28889923/social-risky-decision-making-reveals-gender-differences-in-the-tpj-a-hyperscanning-study-using-functional-near-infrared-spectroscopy
#5
Mingming Zhang, Tao Liu, Matthew Pelowski, Huibin Jia, Dongchuan Yu
Previous neuroscience studies have investigated neural correlates of risky decision-making in a single-brain frame during pseudo social (predominantly non face-to-face) contexts. To fully understand the risky decision-making behavior in more natural social interactions, the present study employed a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) hyperscanning technique to simultaneously measure pairs of participants' fronto-temporal activations in a face-to-face gambling card-game. The intra-brain results revealed that both those who identified as males and as females showed higher activations in their mPFC and in the inferior parts of the frontopolar area, as well as in the tempo-parietal junction (TPJ) in cases involving higher versus lower risk...
September 7, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28865994/resting-state-functional-connectivity-an-emerging-method-for-the-study-of-language-networks-in-post-stroke-aphasia
#6
Julian Klingbeil, Max Wawrzyniak, Anika Stockert, Dorothee Saur
Aphasia results both from direct effects of focal damage to eloquent cortical areas as well as dysfunction of interconnected remote areas within the language network. Resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) can be used to examine functional connectivity (FC) within these networks. Herein we review publications, which applied rsfMRI to understand network pathology in post stroke aphasia. A common finding in this research is an acute disruption of connectivity within the language network, which is correlated with loss of language function and tends to resolve with recovery from aphasia...
August 30, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28865310/dynamic-range-of-frontoparietal-functional-modulation-is-associated-with-working-memory-capacity-limitations-in-older-adults
#7
Jonathan G Hakun, Nathan F Johnson
Older adults tend to over-activate regions throughout frontoparietal cortices and exhibit a reduced range of functional modulation during WM task performance compared to younger adults. While recent evidence suggests that reduced functional modulation is associated with poorer task performance, it remains unclear whether reduced range of modulation is indicative of general WM capacity-limitations. In the current study, we examined whether the range of functional modulation observed over multiple levels of WM task difficulty (N-Back) predicts in-scanner task performance and out-of-scanner psychometric estimates of WM capacity...
August 30, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28844505/using-resting-state-fmri-to-assess-the-effect-of-aerobic-exercise-on-functional-connectivity-of-the-dlpfc-in-older-overweight-adults
#8
Kristin Prehn, Anne Lesemann, Georgia Krey, A Veronica Witte, Theresa Köbe, Ulrike Grittner, Agnes Flöel
Cardiovascular fitness is thought to exert beneficial effects on brain function and might delay the onset of cognitive decline. Empirical evidence of exercise-induced cognitive enhancement, however, has not been conclusive, possibly due to short intervention times in clinical trials. Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) has been proposed asan early indicator for intervention-induced changes. Here, we conducted a study in which healthy older overweight subjects took either part in a moderate aerobic exercise program over 6months (AE group; n=11) or control condition of non-aerobic stretching and toning (NAE group; n=18)...
August 23, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28829994/language-for-action-motor-resonance-during-the-processing-of-human-and-robotic-voices
#9
G Di Cesare, A Errante, M Marchi, V Cuccio
In this fMRI study we evaluated whether the auditory processing of action verbs pronounced by a human or a robotic voice in the imperative mood differently modulates the activation of the mirror neuron system (MNs). The study produced three results. First, the activation pattern found during listening to action verbs was very similar in both the robot and human conditions. Second, the processing of action verbs compared to abstract verbs determined the activation of the fronto-parietal circuit classically involved during the action goal understanding...
August 19, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28826051/executive-function-and-cardiac-autonomic-regulation-in-depressive-disorders
#10
Alexandra Hoffmann, Ulrich Ettinger, Gustavo A Reyes Del Paso, Stefan Duschek
Executive function impairments have been frequently observed in depressive disorders. Moreover, reduced heart rate variability (HRV) has repeatedly been described, especially in the high frequency band (i.e., respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA), suggesting lower vagal cardiac outflow. The study tested the hypothesis of involvement of low vagal tone in executive dysfunction in depression. In addition to RSA, HRV in the low frequency (LF) band was assessed. In 36 patients with depression and 36 healthy subjects, electrocardiography recordings were accomplished at rest and during performance of five executive function tasks (number-letter task, n-back task, continuous performance test, flanker task, and antisaccade task)...
August 18, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28826050/avoiding-math-on-a-rapid-timescale-emotional-responsivity-and-anxious-attention-in-math-anxiety
#11
Rachel G Pizzie, David J M Kraemer
Math anxiety (MA) is characterized by negative feelings towards mathematics, resulting in avoidance of math classes and of careers that rely on mathematical skills. Focused on a long timescale, this research may miss important cognitive and affective processes that operate moment-to-moment, changing rapid reactions even when a student simply sees a math problem. Here, using fMRI with an attentional deployment paradigm, we show that MA influences rapid spontaneous emotional and attentional responses to mathematical stimuli upon brief presentation...
August 18, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802184/functional-neural-bases-of-numerosity-judgments-in-healthy-adults-born-preterm
#12
Caron A C Clark, Yating Liu, Nicolas Lee Abbot Wright, Alan Bedrick, Jamie O Edgin
High rates of mathematics learning disabilities among individuals born preterm (<37weeksGA) have spurred calls for a greater understanding of the nature of these weaknesses and their neural underpinnings. Groups of healthy, high functioning young adults born preterm and full term (n=20) completed a symbolic and non-symbolic magnitude comparison task while undergoing functional MRI scanning. Collectively, participants showed activation in superior and inferior frontal and parietal regions previously linked to numeric processing when comparing non-symbolic magnitude arrays separated by small numeric distances...
August 9, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802183/very-low-birth-weight-is-associated-with-brain-structure-abnormalities-and-cognitive-function-impairments-a-systematic-review
#13
Fereshteh Farajdokht, Saeed Sadigh-Eteghad, Reza Dehghani, Gisou Mohaddes, Leili Abedi, Ramin Bughchechi, Alireza Majdi, Javad Mahmoudi
Very low birth weight (VLBW) children are at risk of structural brain abnormalities and neurocognitive deficits. Since survival rate of the very low birth weight infants has increased over the past decade, a better understanding of the long-term neurocognitive outcomes is needed. The present systematic review investigated the association between VLBW and cognitive function as well as brain structure. PubMed/Medline, Google Scholar, Scopus and Web of Science databases were searched up from January 2000 to January 2015...
August 9, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28800429/bimanual-coordination-positively-predicts-episodic-memory-a-combined-behavioral-and-mri-investigation
#14
Keith B Lyle, Brynn A Dombroski, Leonard Faul, Robin F Hopkins, Farah Naaz, Andrew E Switala, Brendan E Depue
Some people remember events more completely and accurately than other people, but the origins of individual differences in episodic memory are poorly understood. One way to advance understanding is by identifying characteristics of individuals that reliably covary with memory performance. Recent research suggests motor behavior is related to memory performance, with individuals who consistently use a single preferred hand for unimanual actions performing worse than individuals who make greater use of both hands...
August 8, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28800428/socially-anxious-tendencies-affect-neural-processing-of-gaze-perception
#15
Yuki Tsuji, Sotaro Shimada
The gaze of others is known to be a particularly common cause of social anxiety. In the current study, we measured event-related potentials (ERPs) during gaze perception among people with or without high socially anxious tendencies (HSA). The experimental stimuli were grayscale images of the eye region of a face, showing direct or averted eye gaze (leftward gaze or rightward gaze) or closed eyes. We found that negative ERPs at a right occipito-temporal site (N170) and positive ERPs at the fronto-central region (P2) were evoked by eye gaze stimuli...
August 8, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28797898/lateralization-of-spatial-rather-than-temporal-attention-underlies-the-left-hemifield-advantage-in-rapid-serial-visual-presentation
#16
Dariusz Asanowicz, Lena Kruse, Kamila Śmigasiewicz, Rolf Verleger
In bilateral rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), the second of two targets, T1 and T2, is better identified in the left visual field (LVF) than in the right visual field (RVF). This LVF advantage may reflect hemispheric asymmetry in temporal attention or/and in spatial orienting of attention. Participants performed two tasks: the "standard" bilateral RSVP task (Exp.1) and its unilateral variant (Exp.1 & 2). In the bilateral task, spatial location was uncertain, thus target identification involved stimulus-driven spatial orienting...
August 7, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28759780/neural-correlates-of-evaluating-self-and-close-other-in-physical-academic-and-prosocial-domains
#17
R van der Cruijsen, S Peters, E A Crone
Behavioral studies showed that self-concept can be distinguished into different domains, but few neuroimaging studies have investigated either domain-specific or valence-specific activity. Here, we investigated whether evaluating self- and mother-traits in three domains (physical, academic, prosocial) relies on similar or distinct brain regions. Additionally, we explored the topical discussion in the literature on whether vmPFC activity during self-evaluations is induced by valence or importance of traits. Participants evaluated themselves and their mothers on positive and negative traits in three domains...
July 28, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28738210/neural-activity-and-emotional-processing-following-military-deployment-effects-of-mild-traumatic-brain-injury-and-posttraumatic-stress-disorder
#18
Daniel V Zuj, Kim L Felmingham, Matthew A Palmer, Ellie Lawrence-Wood, Miranda Van Hooff, Andrew J Lawrence, Richard A Bryant, Alexander C McFarlane
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are common comorbidities during military deployment that affect emotional brain processing, yet few studies have examined the independent effects of mTBI and PTSD. The purpose of this study was to examine distinct differences in neural responses to emotional faces in mTBI and PTSD. Twenty-one soldiers reporting high PTSD symptoms were compared to 21 soldiers with low symptoms, and 16 soldiers who reported mTBI-consistent injury and symptoms were compared with 16 soldiers who did not sustain an mTBI...
July 21, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28734164/cognitive-strategies-in-the-mental-rotation-task-revealed-by-eeg-spectral-power
#19
Aaron L Gardony, Marianna D Eddy, Tad T Brunyé, Holly A Taylor
The classic mental rotation task (MRT; Shepard & Metzler, 1971) is commonly thought to measure mental rotation, a cognitive process involving covert simulation of motor rotation. Yet much research suggests that the MRT recruits both motor simulation and other analytic cognitive strategies that depend on visuospatial representation and visual working memory (WM). In the present study, we investigated cognitive strategies in the MRT using time-frequency analysis of EEG and independent component analysis. We scrutinized sensorimotor mu (µ) power reduction, associated with motor simulation, parietal alpha (pα) power reduction, associated with visuospatial representation, and frontal midline theta (fmθ) power enhancement, associated with WM maintenance and manipulation...
July 19, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28710940/procedural-learning-in-tourette-syndrome-adhd-and-comorbid-tourette-adhd-evidence-from-a-probabilistic-sequence-learning-task
#20
Ádám Takács, Yuval Shilon, Karolina Janacsek, Andrea Kóbor, Antoine Tremblay, Dezső Németh, Michael T Ullman
Procedural memory, which is rooted in the basal ganglia, plays an important role in the implicit learning of motor and cognitive skills. Few studies have examined procedural learning in either Tourette syndrome (TS) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), despite basal ganglia abnormalities in both of these neurodevelopmental disorders. We aimed to assess procedural learning in children with TS (n=13), ADHD (n=22), and comorbid TS-ADHD (n=20), as well as in typically developing children (n=21). Procedural learning was measured with a well-studied implicit probabilistic sequence learning task, the alternating serial reaction time task...
July 12, 2017: Brain and Cognition
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