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Clinical Biochemist. Reviews

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28167846/report-on-the-findings-of-the-aacb-2014-body-fluid-survey
#1
John Calleja, Bruce Robinson, Intissar Bittar, Yvonne Reidy, James Doery, Kay Weng Choy, Julie Ryan
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28167845/acute-kidney-injury-diagnostic-approaches-and-controversies
#2
REVIEW
Konstantinos Makris, Loukia Spanou
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a significant independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality. In the last ten years a large number of publications have highlighted the limitations of traditional approaches and the inadequacies of conventional biomarkers to diagnose and monitor renal insufficiency in the acute setting. A great effort was directed not only to the discovery and validation of new biomarkers aimed to detect AKI more accurately but also to standardise the definition of AKI. Despite the advances in both areas, biomarkers have not yet entered into routine clinical practice and the definition of this syndrome has many areas of uncertainty...
December 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28167844/current-methods-of-haemolysis-detection-and-reporting-as-a-source-of-risk-to-patient-safety-a-narrative-review
#3
REVIEW
Euan J McCaughey, Elia Vecellio, Rebecca Lake, Ling Li, Leslie Burnett, Douglas Chesher, Stephen Braye, Mark Mackay, Stephanie Gay, Tony C Badrick, Johanna I Westbrook, Andrew Georgiou
AIM: Haemolysis has a major impact on patient safety as the need for a replacement specimen increases the risk of injury and infection, delays test results and extends the duration of hospital stays. Consistency of haemolysis detection and reporting can facilitate the generation of benchmark data used to develop quality practices to monitor and reduce this leading cause of pre-analytical laboratory error. This review aims to investigate current methods of haemolysis detection and reporting...
December 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28167843/consensus-statement-for-the-management-and-reporting-of-haemolysed-specimens
#4
Tony Badrick, Harry Barden, Shaw Callen, Goce Dimeski, Stephanie Gay, Peter Graham, Penny Petinos, Ken Sikaris
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27872507/calculated-chemistry-parameters-do-they-need-to-be-harmonised
#5
REVIEW
David Hughes, James Cg Doery, Kay Weng Choy, Robert Flatman
In clinical chemistry, harmonisation of the testing process is a global initiative with the purpose of improving patient safety, allowing better integration of research data and enabling the use of national electronic heath records. In Australia, as in other countries, the initial focus has been on the harmonisation of the more commonly measured analytes. There are also a number of calculated parameters, derived from these measured analytes, which could also be considered for harmonisation. Calculated parameters that are reported by laboratories and used for clinical decision-making should undergo the same robust process of harmonisation as is the case for the measured analytes...
August 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27872506/harmonising-adult-reference-intervals-in-australia-and-new-zealand-the-continuing-story
#6
REVIEW
Gus Koerbin, Jillian R Tate
Reference intervals (RIs) are used to help clinicians determine if a patient can be classified as being in a diseased or healthy state and there are often sound scientific and clinical reasons for differences in RIs. One of the current strategic priorities for the Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists is to encourage and assist laboratories to achieve harmonisation of RIs for common clinical chemistry analytes where sound calibration and traceability are in place. This need is based on good laboratory practice, providing the clinician with results that allow appropriate and reliable clinical interpretation and progression further toward the national e-health framework and a single electronic health record...
August 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27872505/harmonisation-of-osmolal-gap-can-we-use-a-common-formula
#7
REVIEW
Kay Weng Choy, Nilika Wijeratne, Zhong X Lu, James Cg Doery
Osmolal gap is the difference between the measured osmolality and a calculated osmolality based on the major commonly measured osmotically active particles. The perceived gap indicates the presence of unmeasured osmotically active particles. The major use of osmolal gap today is to screen for the possible presence of exogenous toxic substances in patients in an emergency department or intensive care unit. There is a long history of osmolal gap calculations and it needs to be appreciated that the uncertainty of the osmolal gap will be determined by the sum of errors in the calculated osmolality, error in measured osmolality and variability in unmeasured analytes...
August 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27872504/harmonising-reference-intervals-for-three-calculated-parameters-used-in-clinical-chemistry
#8
REVIEW
David Hughes, Gus Koerbin, Julia M Potter, Nicholas Glasgow, Nic West, Walter P Abhayaratna, Juleen Cavanaugh, David Armbruster, Peter E Hickman
For more than a decade there has been a global effort to harmonise all phases of the testing process, with particular emphasis on the most frequently utilised measurands. In addition, it is recognised that calculated parameters derived from these measurands should also be a target for harmonisation. Using data from the Aussie Normals study we report reference intervals for three calculated parameters: serum osmolality, serum anion gap and albumin-adjusted serum calcium. The Aussie Normals study was an a priori study that analysed samples from 1856 healthy volunteers...
August 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27872503/harmonisation-and-what-s-in-a-unit
#9
EDITORIAL
Jillian R Tate, David Hughes, Kay Weng Choy, Robert Flatman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303073/acute-kidney-injury-definition-pathophysiology-and-clinical-phenotypes
#10
REVIEW
Konstantinos Makris, Loukia Spanou
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome that complicates the course and worsens the outcome in a significant number of hospitalised patients. Recent advances in clinical and basic research will help with a more accurate definition of this syndrome and in the elucidation of its pathogenesis. With this knowledge we will be able to conduct more accurate epidemiologic studies in an effort to gain a better understanding of the impact of this syndrome. AKI is a syndrome that rarely has a sole and distinct pathophysiology...
May 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303072/achievements-and-future-directions-of-the-apfcb-mass-spectrometry-harmonisation-project-on-serum-testosterone
#11
REVIEW
Ronda F Greaves, Chung S Ho, Kirsten E Hoad, John Joseph, Brett McWhinney, Janice P Gill, Therese Koal, Chris Fouracre, Heidi P Iu, Brian R Cooke, Conchita Boyder, Hai T Pham, Lisa M Jolly
As an outcome of the 2010 Asian Pacific Conference for Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry in Hong Kong, a collaborative working group was formed to promote the harmonisation of mass spectrometry methods. The Mass Spectrometry Harmonisation Working Group resides under the combined auspices of the Asia-Pacific Federation for Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine (APFCB) and the Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB). A decision was made to initially focus attention on serum steroids due to the common interest of members in this area; with the first steroid to assess being testosterone...
May 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303071/the-regulation-of-iron-absorption-and-homeostasis
#12
REVIEW
Daniel F Wallace
Iron is an essential element in biology, required for numerous cellular processes. Either too much or too little iron can be detrimental, and organisms have developed mechanisms for balancing iron within safe limits. In mammals there are no controlled mechanisms for the excretion of excess iron, hence body iron homeostasis is regulated at the sites of absorption, utilisation and recycling. This review will discuss the discoveries that have been made in the past 20 years into advancing our understanding of iron homeostasis and its regulation...
May 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27057076/fat-soluble-vitamins-clinical-indications-and-current-challenges-for-chromatographic-measurement
#13
REVIEW
Ali A Albahrani, Ronda F Greaves
Fat-soluble vitamins, including vitamins A, D and E, are required for a wide variety of physiological functions. Over the past two decades, deficiencies of these vitamins have been associated with increased risk of cancer, type II diabetes mellitus and a number of immune system disorders. In addition, there is increasing evidence of interactions between these vitamins, especially between vitamins A and D. As a result of this enhanced clinical association with disease, translational clinical research and laboratory requests for vitamin measurements have significantly increased...
February 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27057075/an-age-calibrated-definition-of-chronic-kidney-disease-rationale-and-benefits
#14
Pierre Delanaye, Richard J Glassock, Hans Pottel, Andrew D Rule
Defining chronic kidney disease (CKD) is the subject of intense debate in the current nephrology literature. The debate concerns the threshold value of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) used to make the diagnosis of CKD. Current recommendations argue that a universal threshold of 60 mL/min/1.73m(2) should be used. This threshold has been defended by epidemiological studies showing that the risk of mortality or end-stage renal disease increases with an eGFR below 60 mL/min/1.73m(2). However, a universal threshold does not take into account the physiologic decline in GFR with ageing nor does it account for the risk of mortality and end-stage renal disease being trivial with isolated eGFR levels just below 60 mL/min/1...
February 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27057074/androgen-receptor-structure-function-and-biology-from-bench-to-bedside
#15
REVIEW
Rachel A Davey, Mathis Grossmann
The actions of androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated via the androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-dependent nuclear transcription factor and member of the steroid hormone nuclear receptor family. Given its widespread expression in many cells and tissues, the AR has a diverse range of biological actions including important roles in the development and maintenance of the reproductive, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, immune, neural and haemopoietic systems. AR signalling may also be involved in the development of tumours in the prostate, bladder, liver, kidney and lung...
February 2016: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26900192/variation-in-laboratory-reporting-of-haemolysis-a-need-for-harmonisation
#16
Penny Petinos, Stephanie Gay, Tony Badrick
AIM: The purpose of this survey was to determine the cut-offs being used by Australian laboratories using their instrument's Haemolysis Index (HI), whether these cut-offs vary, and at what level of haemolysis (or haemolysis index) did laboratories stop reporting one or more analytes. This was done in response to the large numbers of haemolysed samples reported in the RCPAQAP Key Incident Monitoring and Management System External Quality Assurance program (KIMMS EQA) and lack of information in the literature at the time regarding what to do once a haemolysed sample was identified...
November 2015: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26900191/aspects-to-consider-in-adopting-pregnancy-specific-reference-intervals
#17
Narelle Hadlow, Ken Sikaris
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2015: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26900190/reporting-thyroid-function-tests-in-pregnancy
#18
REVIEW
Alan R McNeil, Phoebe E Stanford
While there is agreement that overt maternal hypothyroidism (serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) >10 mIU/L) should be treated immediately, the evidence is mixed regarding the harm associated with subclinical hypothyroidism and the benefits of thyroxine replacement. The diagnosis of subclinical hypothyroidism rests on the recognition of an increased serum concentration of TSH which may be affected by many factors including gestational age, analytical method, the antibody status of the mother, ethnicity, iodine nutrition and even the time of day when the blood is collected...
November 2015: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26900189/consensus-statement-for-the-management-and-communication-of-high-risk-laboratory-results
#19
REVIEW
Craig Campbell, Grahame Caldwell, Penelope Coates, Robert Flatman, Andrew Georgiou, Andrea Rita Horvath, Que Lam, Hans Schneider
Ineffective test follow-up is a major source of harm for patients around the world. Unreliable communication from medical laboratories (henceforth termed 'laboratories') to clinicians of results that represent critical or significant risk to patients (collectively termed 'high risk results') is a contributing factor to this problem. Throughout Australasia, management practices for such results vary considerably. The recommendations presented in this document are based on best practice derived from the published literature and follow consultation with a wide range of stakeholders...
August 2015: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26900188/collective-opinion-paper-on-a-2013-aacb-workshop-of-experts-seeking-harmonisation-of-approaches-to-setting-a-laboratory-quality-control-policy
#20
Graham Jones, John Calleja, Douglas Chesher, Curtis Parvin, John Yundt-Pacheco, Mark Mackay, Tony Badrick
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2015: Clinical Biochemist. Reviews
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