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Annual Review of Nutrition

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29579406/a-life-in-food-a-grain-of-salt-and-some-humble-pie
#1
Michael J Gibney
From my senior school days, I had wanted to pursue a career in food. In quite what capacity I was not too sure. So my starting points were within the fields of animal nutrition before moving for the major part of my career to medical schools to study human nutrition and health. My career scientific achievements lie within the Kuhnian spectrum of normal science, but within that normality, I was always one to challenge conventional wisdom. An academic career is about more than just research. It is about teaching and not just the minutiae of nutrition, but about life and living, about challenges and failures...
March 26, 2018: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28826376/nutrition-from-the-inside-out
#2
Dennis M Bier
Nearly 50 years ago, I set out to investigate the clinical problem of hypoglycemia in children with illnesses that limited their food intake. My goal was to gather accurate and precise measurable data. At the time, I wasn't interested in nutrition as a discipline defined in its more general or popular sense. To address the specific problem that interested me required development of entirely new methods based on stable, nonradioactive tracers that satisfied the conditions of accuracy and precision. At the time, I had no inclination of the various theoretical and practical problems that would have to be solved to achieve this goal...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28826375/nature-nurture-and-cancer-risks-genetic-and-nutritional-contributions-to-cancer
#3
REVIEW
Evropi Theodoratou, Maria Timofeeva, Xue Li, Xiangrui Meng, John P A Ioannidis
It is speculated that genetic variants are associated with differential responses to nutrients (known as gene-diet interactions) and that these variations may be linked to different cancer risks. In this review, we critically evaluate the evidence across 314 meta-analyses of observational studies and randomized controlled trials of dietary risk factors and the five most common cancers (breast, lung, prostate, colorectal, and stomach). We also critically evaluate the evidence across 13 meta-analyses of observational studies of gene-diet interactions for the same cancers...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28826374/coffee-caffeine-and-health-outcomes-an-umbrella-review
#4
REVIEW
Giuseppe Grosso, Justyna Godos, Fabio Galvano, Edward L Giovannucci
To evaluate the associations between coffee and caffeine consumption and various health outcomes, we performed an umbrella review of the evidence from meta-analyses of observational studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Of the 59 unique outcomes examined in the selected 112 meta-analyses of observational studies, coffee was associated with a probable decreased risk of breast, colorectal, colon, endometrial, and prostate cancers; cardiovascular disease and mortality; Parkinson's disease; and type-2 diabetes...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28826373/fatty-acids-and-nlrp3-inflammasome-mediated-inflammation-in-metabolic-tissues
#5
REVIEW
Jessica C Ralston, Claire L Lyons, Elaine B Kennedy, Anna M Kirwan, Helen M Roche
Worldwide obesity rates have reached epidemic proportions and significantly contribute to the growing prevalence of metabolic diseases. Chronic low-grade inflammation, a hallmark of obesity, involves immune cell infiltration into expanding adipose tissue. In turn, obesity-associated inflammation can lead to complications in other metabolic tissues (e.g., liver, skeletal muscle, pancreas) through lipotoxicity and inflammatory signaling networks. Importantly, although numerous signaling pathways are known to integrate metabolic and inflammatory processes, the nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor, leucine-rich repeat and pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is now noted to be a key regulator of metabolic inflammation...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28826372/%C3%AE-hydroxybutyrate-a-signaling-metabolite
#6
REVIEW
John C Newman, Eric Verdin
Various mechanisms in the mammalian body provide resilience against food deprivation and dietary stress. The ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) is synthesized in the liver from fatty acids and represents an essential carrier of energy from the liver to peripheral tissues when the supply of glucose is too low for the body's energetic needs, such as during periods of prolonged exercise, starvation, or absence of dietary carbohydrates. In addition to its activity as an energetic metabolite, BHB is increasingly understood to have cellular signaling functions...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28715994/fgf23-and-nutritional-metabolism
#7
REVIEW
Lindsay R Pool, Myles Wolf
The discovery of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) has provided a more complete understanding of the regulation of phosphate and mineral homeostasis in health and in chronic kidney disease. It has also offered new insights into stratification of risk of cardiovascular events and death among patients with chronic kidney disease and the general population. In this review, we provide an overview of FGF23 biology and physiology, summarize clinical outcomes that have been associated with FGF23, discuss potential mechanisms for these observations and their public health implications, and explore clinical and population health interventions that aim to reduce FGF23 levels and improve public health...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28715993/metabolic-effects-of-intermittent-fasting
#8
REVIEW
Ruth E Patterson, Dorothy D Sears
The objective of this review is to provide an overview of intermittent fasting regimens, summarize the evidence on the health benefits of intermittent fasting, and discuss physiological mechanisms by which intermittent fasting might lead to improved health outcomes. A MEDLINE search was performed using PubMed and the terms "intermittent fasting," "fasting," "time-restricted feeding," and "food timing." Modified fasting regimens appear to promote weight loss and may improve metabolic health...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28715992/the-hibernator-microbiome-host-bacterial-interactions-in-an-extreme-nutritional-symbiosis
#9
REVIEW
Hannah V Carey, Fariba M Assadi-Porter
Animals that undergo seasonal cycles of feeding and fasting have adaptations that maintain integrity of organ systems when dietary nutrients are lacking. Food deprivation also challenges the gut microbiota, which relies heavily on host diet for metabolic substrates and the gastrointestinal tract, which is influenced by enteral nutrients and microbial activity. Winter fasting in hibernators shifts the microbiota to favor taxa with the capacity to degrade and utilize host-derived substrates and disfavor taxa that prefer complex plant polysaccharides...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28715991/trimethylamine-n-oxide-the-microbiome-and-heart-and-kidney-disease
#10
REVIEW
Steven H Zeisel, Manya Warrier
Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) is a biologically active molecule and is a putative promoter of chronic diseases including atherosclerosis in humans. Host intestinal bacteria produce its precursor trimethylamine (TMA) from carnitine, choline, or choline-containing compounds. Most of the TMA produced is passively absorbed into portal circulation, and hepatic flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) efficiently oxidize TMA to TMAO. Both observational and experimental studies suggest a strong positive correlation between increased plasma TMAO concentrations and adverse cardiovascular events, such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and death...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28715990/single-subject-studies-in-translational-nutrition-research
#11
REVIEW
Nicholas J Schork, Laura H Goetz
There is a great deal of interest in personalized, individualized, or precision interventions for disease and health-risk mitigation. This is as true of nutrition-based intervention and prevention strategies as it is for pharmacotherapies and pharmaceutical-oriented prevention strategies. Essentially, technological breakthroughs have enabled researchers to probe an individual's unique genetic, biochemical, physiological, behavioral, and exposure profile, allowing them to identify very specific and often nuanced factors that an individual might possess, which may make it more or less likely that he or she responds favorably to a particular intervention (e...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28645222/dietary-fat-and-risk-of-cardiovascular-disease-recent-controversies-and-advances
#12
REVIEW
Dong D Wang, Frank B Hu
Health effects of dietary fats have been extensively studied for decades. However, controversies exist on the effects of various types of fatty acids, especially saturated fatty acid (SFA), on cardiovascular disease (CVD). Current evidence supports that different types of dietary fatty acids have divergent effects on CVD risk, and the effects also depend strongly on the comparison or replacement macronutrient. A significant reduction in CVD risk can be achieved if SFAs are replaced by unsaturated fats, especially polyunsaturated fatty acids...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28637384/long-term-effects-of-high-protein-diets-on-renal-function
#13
REVIEW
Anne-Lise Kamper, Svend Strandgaard
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has a prevalence of approximately 13% and is most frequently caused by diabetes and hypertension. In population studies, CKD etiology is often uncertain. Some experimental and observational human studies have suggested that high-protein intake may increase CKD progression and even cause CKD in healthy people. The protein source may be important. Daily red meat consumption over years may increase CKD risk, whereas white meat and dairy proteins appear to have no such effect, and fruit and vegetable proteins may be renal protective...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28628361/lipocalin-2-an-emerging-player-in-iron-homeostasis-and-inflammation
#14
REVIEW
Xia Xiao, Beng San Yeoh, Matam Vijay-Kumar
Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), an innate immune protein, has emerged as a critical iron regulatory protein during physiological and inflammatory conditions. As a bacteriostatic factor, Lcn2 obstructs the siderophore iron-acquiring strategy of bacteria and thus inhibits bacterial growth. As part of host nutritional immunity, Lcn2 facilitates systemic, cellular, and mucosal hypoferremia during inflammation, in addition to stabilizing the siderophore-bound labile iron pool. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the interaction between Lcn2 and iron, and its effects in various inflammatory diseases...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28628360/genetic-risk-factors-for-folate-responsive-neural-tube-defects
#15
REVIEW
Anne M Molloy, Faith Pangilinan, Lawrence C Brody
Neural tube defects (NTDs) are the most severe congenital malformations of the central nervous system. The etiology is complex, with both genetic and environmental factors having important contributions. Researchers have known for the past two decades that maternal periconceptional use of the B vitamin folic acid can prevent many NTDs. Though this finding is arguably one of the most important recent discoveries in birth defect research, the mechanism by which folic acid exerts this benefit remains unknown. Research to date has focused on the hypothesis that an underlying genetic susceptibility interacts with folate-sensitive metabolic processes at the time of neural tube closure...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28628359/genetic-basis-for-sex-differences-in-obesity-and-lipid-metabolism
#16
REVIEW
Jenny C Link, Karen Reue
Men and women exhibit significant differences in obesity, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. To provide better diagnosis and treatment for both sexes, it is important to identify factors that underlie the observed sex differences. Traditionally, sex differences have been attributed to the differential effects of male and female gonadal secretions (commonly referred to as sex hormones), which substantially influence many aspects of metabolism and related diseases. Less appreciated as a contributor to sex differences are the fundamental genetic differences between males and females, which are ultimately determined by the presence of an XX or XY sex chromosome complement...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28613982/dietary-phosphorus-intake-and-the-kidney
#17
REVIEW
Alex R Chang, Cheryl Anderson
Although phosphorus is an essential nutrient required for multiple physiological functions, recent research raises concerns that high phosphorus intake could have detrimental effects on health. Phosphorus is abundant in the food supply of developed countries, occurring naturally in protein-rich foods and as an additive in processed foods. High phosphorus intake can cause vascular and renal calcification, renal tubular injury, and premature death in multiple animal models. Small studies in human suggest that high phosphorus intake may result in positive phosphorus balance and correlate with renal calcification and albuminuria...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28574804/the-best-of-times
#18
Johanna T Dwyer
I came of age as a nutrition scientist during the best of times-years that spanned a rapidly changing world of food and nutrition science, politics, and policy that greatly broadened the specialty and its influence on public affairs. I followed the conventional route in academe, working my way up the academic ladder in Boston from a base first in a school of public health and later in a teaching hospital and medical school, interspersed with stints in Washington, DC. Thus I tell a tale of two cities. Those were the best of times because nutrition science and policy converged and led to important policies and programs that shaped the field for the next 50 years...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28564556/brain-on-fire-incentive-salience-hedonic-hot-spots-dopamine-obesity-and-other-hunger-games
#19
REVIEW
Jameason D Cameron, Jean-Philippe Chaput, Anders M Sjödin, Gary S Goldfield
This review examines human feeding behavior in light of psychological motivational theory and highlights the importance of midbrain dopamine (DA). Prospective evidence of both reward surfeit and reward deficit pathways to increased body weight are evaluated, and we argue that it is more complex than an either/or scenario when examining DA's role in reward sensitivity, eating, and obesity. The Taq1A genotype is a common thread that ties the contrasting models of DA reward and obesity; this genotype related to striatal DA is not associated with obesity class per se but may nevertheless confer an increased risk of weight gain...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28564555/holocarboxylase-synthetase-a-moonlighting-transcriptional-coregulator-of-gene-expression-and-a-cytosolic-regulator-of-biotin-utilization
#20
REVIEW
Alfonso León-Del-Río, Viviana Valadez-Graham, Roy A Gravel
The vitamin biotin is an essential nutrient for the metabolism and survival of all organisms owing to its function as a cofactor of enzymes collectively known as biotin-dependent carboxylases. These enzymes use covalently attached biotin as a vector to transfer a carboxyl group between donor and acceptor molecules during carboxylation reactions. In human cells, biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze key reactions in gluconeogenesis, fatty acid synthesis, and amino acid catabolism. Biotin is attached to apocarboxylases by a biotin ligase: holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) in mammalian cells and BirA in microbes...
August 21, 2017: Annual Review of Nutrition
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