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Sociology of Health & Illness

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29466825/responses-to-warnings-about-the-impact-of-eating-disorders-on-fertility-a-qualitative-study
#1
Su Holmes
Eating disorders (EDs) have often been discussed as a risk to reproductive health. But existing research is quantitative in nature, paying no attention to issues of patient experience. In discussing data from 24 semi-structured interviews, this article draws on sociological approaches to medical 'risk' and feminist approaches to EDs to explore how women with experience of an ED responded to fertility warnings within treatment contexts. In doing so, it is suggested that responses to fertility warnings offer unique insight into the potentially damaging limitations of biomedical approaches to eating problems and their focus on EDs as individual 'pathologies' (rather than culturally embedded expressions of gendered embodiment)...
February 21, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29446117/the-sociology-of-cancer-a-decade-of-research
#2
Anne Kerr, Emily Ross, Gwen Jacques, Sarah Cunningham-Burley
Biomedicine is often presented as the driving force behind improvements in cancer care, with genomics the latest innovation poised to change the meaning, diagnosis, treatment, prevention and lived experience of cancer. Reviewing sociological analyses of a diversity of patient and practitioner experiences and accounts of cancer during the last decade (2007-17), we explore the experiences of, approaches to and understandings of cancer in this period. We identify three key areas of focus: (i) cancer patient experiences and identities; (ii) cancer risk and responsibilities and (iii) bioclinical collectives...
February 15, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29441595/analysing-barriers-to-service-improvement-using-a-multi-level-theory-of-innovation-the-case-of-glaucoma-outpatient-clinics
#3
Simon Turner, Christos Vasilakis, Martin Utley, Paul Foster, Aachal Kotecha, Naomi J Fulop
The development and implementation of innovation by healthcare providers is understood as a multi-determinant and multi-level process. Theories at different analytical levels (i.e. micro and organisational) are needed to capture the processes that influence innovation by provide. This article combines a micro theory of innovation, actor-network theory, with organisational level processes using the 'resource based view of the firm'. It examines the influence of, and interplay between, innovation-seeking teams (micro) and underlying organisational capabilities (meso) during innovation processes...
February 13, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29441591/beyond-the-binaries-reshaping-pain-communication-through-arts-workshops
#4
Jen Tarr, Flora Cornish, Elena Gonzalez-Polledo
Pain is difficult to communicate and translate into language, yet most social research on pain experience uses questionnaires and semi-structured interviews that rely on words. In addition to the mind/body dualism prevalent in pain medicine in these studies pain communication is characterised by further value-laden binaries such as real/unreal, visible/invisible, and psychological/physical. Starting from the position that research methods play a role in constituting their object, this article examines the potential of participatory arts workshops for developing different versions of pain communication...
February 13, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29430679/seeking-certainty-through-narrative-closure-men-s-stories-of-prostate-cancer-treatments-in-a-state-of-liminality
#5
Ilkka Pietilä, Raisa Jurva, Hanna Ojala, Teuvo Tammela
Radical treatments of prostate cancer often lead to a pervasive liminal state that is characterised by multiple uncertainties that relate both to a possible recurrence of cancer and recovery from side effects, such as erectile and urinary dysfunctions. Liminality can make it difficult for cancer patients to narrate their experiences, as their stories lack a definite ending. After interviews with 22 Finnish men who had undergone radical prostatectomy, we analysed how men produce closure in their illness narratives...
February 11, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29424102/complex-care-and-contradictions-of-choice-in-the-safety-net
#6
Meredith Van Natta, Nancy J Burke, Irene H Yen, Sara Rubin, Mark D Fleming, Ariana Thompson-Lastad, Janet K Shim
This article explores the complicated and often-contradictory notions of choice at play in complex care management (CCM) programmes in the US healthcare safety net. Drawing from longitudinal data collected over two years of ethnographic fieldwork at urban safety-net clinics, our study examines the CCM goal of transforming frequent emergency department (ED) utilisers into 'active' patients who will reduce their service utilisation and thereby contribute to a more rational, cost-effective healthcare system. By considering our data alongside philosopher Annemarie Mol's (2008) conceptualisation of the competing logics of choice and care, we argue that these premises often undermine CCM teams' efforts to support patients and provide the care they need - not only to prevent medical crises, but to overcome socio-economic barriers as well...
February 8, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29411393/culturally-embedded-health-beliefs-self-care-and-the-use-of-anti-ageing-medicine-among-australian-and-japanese-older-adults
#7
Maho Omori, Deborah Dempsey
Adopting Kleinman's and Lock's ideas that there are cultural variations in understandings of health care and the medicalisation of ageing bodies, this study compares and contrasts older adults' use of anti-ageing medicine in two cultural settings. Based on 42 interviews conducted in Australia and Japan with adults aged 60 and over, findings revealed distinct pathways to initiating anti-ageing medicine use between the two cohorts which reflect different attitudes to the medicalisation of ageing in the two settings...
February 6, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29327351/negotiating-inter-professional-interaction-playing-the-general-practitioner-pharmacist-game
#8
Fay Bradley, Darren M Ashcroft, Nick Crossley
Despite a mutual interest in optimising the benefits of medication for patients, the general practitioner (GP) and community pharmacist (CP) often work in isolation from one another, both physically and figuratively. Sources of tension include pharmacy's 'shopkeeper' image, traditional medical hierarchies and potential encroachment on professional boundaries. This article examines GP and CP perceptions of their interactions and negotiations and, drawing on the works of Stein and Goffman, identifies a set of 'unwritten' rules, termed the 'GP-pharmacist game', which involves the concept of 'face-work'...
January 12, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29314096/formats-of-responsibility-elective-surgery-in-the-era-of-evidence-based-medicine
#9
Ariel Ducey, Shoghi Nikoo
This article illustrates what pragmatic sociology refers to as investments in form, by examining the formats created and used by a group of surgeons to determine when elective surgery for pelvic floor disorders could be responsibly undertaken. Drawing upon ethnographic observations of surgical consultations at an academic medical centre in Canada, we show how two specific formats - that the patient is sufficiently bothered and the patient accepts the risks of surgery - allow for justifiable action in conditions of uncertainty and contingency and in light of the demands of dominant imperatives in medicine and health care, especially evidence-based medicine (EBM)...
January 3, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29280538/-you-re-there-because-you-are-unprofessional-patient-and-public-involvement-as-liminal-knowledge-spaces
#10
Kath Maguire, Nicky Britten
Patient and public involvement in health research and care has been repeatedly theorised using the metaphor of spaces, knowledge spaces and participatory citizenship spaces. Drawing on data from a three year qualitative study of people involved in health research with organisations across England, this article explores where these spaces fit in a wider social, political and historical landscape. It outlines a theme recurring frequently in the study data: a unified public/patient/service-user perspective in opposition to a professional/clinical/academic view...
December 27, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29280501/-just-because-a-doctor-says-something-doesn-t-mean-that-it-will-happen-self-perception-as-having-a-fertility-problem-among-infertility-patients
#11
Ophra Leyser-Whalen, Arthur L Greil, Julia McQuillan, Katherine M Johnson, Karina M Shrefffler
Only some individuals who have the medically defined condition 'infertility' adopt a self-definition as having a fertility problem, which has implications for social and behavioural responses, yet there is no clear consensus on why some people and not others adopt a medical label. We use interview data from 28 women and men who sought medical infertility treatment to understand variations in self-identification. Results highlight the importance of identity disruption for understanding the dialectical relationship between medical contact and self-identification, as well as how diagnosis acts both as a category and a process...
December 27, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29274085/-i-guess-i-do-have-to-take-back-what-i-said-before-about-television-pregnant-women-s-understandings-and-use-of-televisual-representations-of-childbearing
#12
Danielle Bessett, Stef Murawsky
Research on television as a source of childbearing information is divided on its importance. Drawing from a sample of 64 pregnant women in the greater New York and Connecticut metropolitan area, we examine how women understand the influence of television on their expectations for pregnancy and birth. A sizable minority (44%) regularly watched reality television programmes on childbearing; all engaged in active viewing practices, such as recognising programme formula and evaluating plausibility of depictions...
December 23, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29235133/operating-on-the-self-transforming-agency-through-obesity-surgery-and-treatment
#13
Else Vogel
In this article, I describe the processes through which patients diagnosed with 'morbid obesity' become active subjects through undergoing obesity surgery and an empowerment lifestyle programme in a Dutch obesity clinic. Following work in actor-network theory and material semiotics that complicates the distinction between active and passive subjects, I trace how agency is configured and re-distributed throughout the treatment trajectory. In the clinic's elaborate care assemblage - consisting of dieticians, exercise coaches and psychologists - the person is not only actively involved in his/her own change, the subject of intervention is the self as 'actor': his/her material constitution, inclinations and feelings...
December 12, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29235132/mitochondrial-donation-patient-engagement-and-narratives-of-hope
#14
Cathy Herbrand, Rebecca Dimond
This article develops the sociology of hope and patient engagement by exploring how patients' perceptions and actions are shaped by narratives of hope surrounding the clinical introduction of novel reproductive techniques. In 2015, after extensive public debates, the UK became the first country to legalise a mitochondrial donation technique aimed at preventing the transmission of inherited disorders. The article draws on the accounts of twenty-two women of reproductive age who are at risk of having a child with mitochondrial disease and would be the potential target of the technique...
December 12, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29235128/-love-builds-brains-representations-of-attachment-and-children-s-brain-development-in-parenting-education-material
#15
Glenda Wall
A focus on early brain development has come to dominate expert child rearing advice over the past two decades. Recent scholars have noted a reinvigoration of the concept of attachment in this advice and changes in the ways that attachment is framed and understood. The extent to which the concept of attachment is drawn on, the way it is framed, and the consequences for mothers, families and parent-child relationships is examined through a discursive analysis of a current Canadian parental education campaign...
December 12, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29230815/topographies-of-care-pathways-and-healthscapes-reconsidering-the-multiple-journeys-of-people-with-a-brain-tumour
#16
Henry Llewellyn, Paul Higgs, Elizabeth L Sampson, Louise Jones, Lewis Thorne
People diagnosed with brain tumours enter new and unfamiliar worlds in which they must make complex and previously unimaginable decisions about care, treatment and how to live their lives. While decisions are increasingly based around care pathways, these are embedded in values that often fail to accord with those of patients. In this article, we examine the cases of people with a brain tumour and how they, their families and healthcare professionals navigate and intervene in the course of life-threatening disease...
December 12, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29464776/private-finance-initiative-hospital-architecture-towards-a-political-economy-of-the-royal-liverpool-university-hospital
#17
Paul Jones
Sociological analysis has done much to illuminate the architectural contexts in which social life takes place. Research on care environments suggests that the built environment should not be understood as a passive backdrop to healthcare, but rather that care is conditioned by the architecture in which it happens. This article argues for the importance of going beyond the hospital walls to include the politics that underwrite the design and construction of hospital buildings. The article assesses the case of the yet-to-be-realised Liverpool Royal University Hospital, and the private finance initiative (PFI) funding that underpins the scheme, which is suggested as a salient 'external' context for understanding architecture's role in the provision of healthcare of many kinds for many years to come...
February 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29464775/conceptualising-materialities-of-care-making-visible-mundane-material-culture-in-health-and-social-care-contexts
#18
Christina Buse, Daryl Martin, Sarah Nettleton
'Materialities of care' is outlined as a heuristic device for making visible the mundane and often unnoticed aspects of material culture within health and social care contexts, and exploring interrelations between materials and care in practice. Three analytic strands inherent to the concept are delineated: spatialities of care, temporalities of care and practices of care. These interconnecting themes span the articles in this special issue. The articles explore material practice across a range of clinical and non-clinical spaces, including hospitals, hospices, care homes, museums, domestic spaces, and community spaces such as shops and tenement stairwells...
February 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29464774/family-food-practices-relationships-materiality-and-the-everyday-at-the-end-of-life
#19
Julie Ellis
This article draws on data from a research project that combined participant observation with in-depth interviews to explore family relationships and experiences of everyday life during life-threatening illness. In it I suggest that death has often been theorised in ways that make its 'mundane' practices less discernible. As a means to foreground the everyday, and to demonstrate its importance to the study of dying, this article explores the (re)negotiation of food and eating in families facing the end of life...
February 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29464773/thinking-with-care-infrastructures-people-devices-and-the-home-in-home-blood-pressure-monitoring
#20
Kate Weiner, Catherine Will
The growing consumer market in health monitoring devices means that technologies that were once the preserve of the clinic are moving into spaces such as homes and workplaces. We consider how one such device, blood pressure monitors, comes to be integrated into everyday life. We pursue the concept of 'care infrastructure', drawing on recent scholarship in STS and medical sociology, to illuminate the work and range of people, things and spaces involved in self-monitoring. Drawing on a UK study involving observations and interviews with 31 people who have used a consumer blood pressure monitor, we apply the concept beyond chronic illness, to practices involving consumer devices - and develop a critical account of its value...
February 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
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