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Sociology of Health & Illness

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28643845/on-the-advancement-of-therapeutic-penality-therapeutic-authority-personality-science-and-the-therapeutic-community
#1
Ruari-Santiago McBride
In this article I examine the advancement of therapeutic penality in the UK, a penal philosophy that reimagines prison policy, practices and environments utilising psychological knowledge. Adopting a historical approach, I show how modern therapeutic penality is linked to the emergence of personality science in the nineteenth century and the development of the democratic therapeutic community (DTC) model in the twentieth century. I outline how at the turn of the twenty-first century a catalytic event generated a moral panic that led the British government to mobilise psychological knowledge and technologies in an attempt to manage dangerous people with severe personality disorder...
June 23, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28639371/a-movement-for-improvement-a-qualitative-study-of-the-adoption-of-social-movement-strategies-in-the-implementation-of-a-quality-improvement-campaign
#2
Justin Waring, Amanda Crompton
Given the difficulties of implementing 'top-down' quality improvements, health service leaders have turned to methods that empower clinicians to co-produce 'bottom-up' improvements. This has involved the adoption of strategies and activities associated with social movements, with clinicians encouraged to participate in collective action towards the shared goal of improvement. This paper examines the adoption of social movement methods by hospital managers as a strategy for implementing a quality improvement 'campaign'...
June 21, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28639296/pathways-to-professionalism-quality-improvement-care-pathways-and-the-interplay-of-standardisation-and-clinical-autonomy
#3
Graham P Martin, David Kocman, Timothy Stephens, Carol J Peden, Rupert M Pearse
Care pathways are a prominent feature of efforts to improve healthcare quality, outcomes and accountability, but sociological studies of pathways often find professional resistance to standardisation. This qualitative study examined the adoption and adaptation of a novel pathway as part of a randomised controlled trial in an unusually complex, non-linear field - emergency general surgery - by teams of surgeons and physicians in six theoretically sampled sites in the UK. We find near-universal receptivity to the concept of a pathway as a means of improving peri-operative processes and outcomes, but concern about the impact on appropriate professional judgement...
June 21, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28600800/women-weight-poverty-and-menopause-understanding-health-practices-in-a-context-of-chronic-disease-prevention
#4
Mélisa Audet, Alex Dumas, Rachelle Binette, Isabelle J Dionne
Socioeconomic inequalities in health persist despite major investments in illness prevention campaigns and universal healthcare systems. In this context, the increased risks of chronic diseases of specific sub-groups of vulnerable populations should be further investigated. The objective of this qualitative study is to examine the interaction between socioeconomic status (SES) and body weight in order to understand underprivileged women's increased vulnerability to chronic diseases after menopause. By drawing specifically on Pierre Bourdieu's sociocultural theory of practice, 20 semi-structured interviews were conducted from May to December of 2013 to investigate the health practices of clinically overweight, postmenopausal women living an underprivileged life in Canada...
June 10, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28597495/ageing-and-memory-medication-social-rationales-and-consumption-practices
#5
Noémia Lopes, Elsa Pegado, Joana R Zózimo
This article focuses on the social rationales underlying the consumption or rejection of medication for memory by the elderly. Our analysis is set within the wider frame of the current use of psychopharmaceuticals for the enhancement of everyday performance, discussing its relationship to new cultures of ageing. Our results, from a recently concluded study, point to different patterns of investment in memory in old age. On the one hand, we found a willingness to consume medication for memory - a heterogeneous disposition split between the imaginary of disease and that of performance enhancement...
June 9, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28594091/contingent-maternities-maternal-claims-making-in-third-party-reproduction
#6
Katherine M Johnson
The new reproductive technologies have significantly impacted definitions of motherhood. Historically, mothers were defined through the act of giving birth, but egg donation, embryo donation, and surrogacy disrupt this. Now multiple women can potentially claim maternity through gestational, genetic, legal, and social ties. Although there is some legal precedent for designating parentage, there is no simple solution to identify the 'true' mother. I address maternal claims-making in third party reproduction via a content analysis of US patient literature for infertile women...
June 8, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28593657/the-silencing-effects-of-the-childhood-innocence-ideal-the-perceptions-and-practices-of-fathers-in-educating-their-children-about-sexuality
#7
Clare Bennett, Jane Harden, Sally Anstey
This study employed Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis to explore eight fathers' perceptions and practices in talking to their ten year old children about puberty, relationships and reproduction. The fathers participated in face to face interviews which were analysed idiographically initially, followed by analysis at the group level. Interpretations were then developed through critical application of a Foucauldian lens of governmentality and biopower. The results revealed a tension between the fathers' cognitions, accounts and behaviours...
June 7, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28555937/market-driven-production-of-biospecimens-and-the-role-of-nhs-hospital-led-biobanks
#8
Stephen Timmons, Paraskevas Vezyridis
Biobanks are vital for biospecimen production in research, despite the regulatory, recruitment and commercial difficulties they face. We conducted interviews with clinicians, researchers, volunteers who recruit biobank participants, regulators and NHS managers about the integration of a biobank into an NHS hospital. We show that medical waste collected for biomedical research acquires its socio-ethical and economic value from the level of integration (both technologically and organisationally) of the biobank into the NHS hospital...
May 27, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543619/the-company-you-keep-is-socialising-with-higher-status-people-bad-for-mental-health
#9
Min-Ah Lee, Ichiro Kawachi
Socialising with higher-status individuals can be hypothesised to exert opposing influences on the mental health of the ego. On the one hand, socialising with higher-status alters might enable individuals to access valuable resources. On the other hand, status-discrepant friendships could be detrimental to mental health by engendering feelings of unfairness. We sought to examine the impact of status-discrepant social relationships on depressive symptoms in the 2012 Korean General Social Survey (KGSS), a nationally representative sample...
May 24, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543376/the-everyday-risk-work-of-dutch-child-healthcare-professionals-inferring-safe-and-good-parenting-through-trust-as-mediated-by-a-lens-of-gender-and-class
#10
Gerlieke Veltkamp, Patrick Brown
Amidst intensifying policy concerns with children's wellbeing and development, healthcare professionals are required not only to assess risk of abuse and neglect, but to manage risk of 'poor parenting' more broadly. Drawing on 15 in-depth interviews and non-participant observations of 61 professional-family interactions, across four preventative public health services for children in the Netherlands, we explored how professionals accomplished such risk work amid intractable uncertainties. Building inferences from brief encounters with families, professionals gauged the extent to which they trusted parents to care 'appropriately'...
May 24, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28523700/balancing-medical-accuracy-and-diagnostic-consequences-diagnosing-medically-unexplained-symptoms-in-primary-care
#11
Erik B Rasmussen
Focusing on the case of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS), this article explores diagnostic classification in the absence of biomedical evidence or other strong medical warrants for diagnosis. The data are from three focus group interviews with Norwegian general practitioners (GPs) conducted in 2015, that centred on the issue of what diagnoses to use (or not) for MUS. The qualitative analysis reconstructs the logic underlying GPs' diagnostic accounts, which centred on the meaning of diagnostic categories and on anticipating how 'generalised others' would respond to those meanings (called 'diagnosing by anticipation')...
May 18, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28503755/wanting-to-work-managing-the-sick-role-in-high-stake-sickness-insurance-meetings
#12
Marie Flinkfeldt
This article respecifies and develops Parsons's sick role theory, focusing on the postulate that the sick person must 'want' to get well. Using conversation analysis and discursive psychology to study how the psychological term 'want' is used in high-stake, multi-professional meetings with sickness benefit claimants in Sweden, the article shows how establishing that one 'wants' to get well requires extensive interactional work. In the examined meetings, the sick person's 'want' formulations make explicit the relationship between 'wants' and illness or inabilities, thus allowing for motivational character to be established without committing to its implications, and without appearing strategic or biased...
May 15, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425136/molecularisation-and-metaphor
#13
David Armstrong
This article explores the molecularisation of medicine thesis by investigating reports on genetics and molecular medicine in the New England Journal of Medicine. While there has indeed been a large increase in the number of references to molecules in the context of genetics over the last few decades these are mostly embedded in a framework of explanatory metaphors, namely (gene) expressivity, penetrance, regulation and pathways. As most of these metaphors are drawn from the social world it would appear that the molecularisation thesis - that social life is becoming dominated by the molecular - needs to be tempered by the ways in which understanding of that molecular world is itself a reflection of social life...
April 20, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425118/engaging-conceptions-of-identity-in-a-context-of-medical-pluralism-explaining-treatment-choices-for-everyday-illness-in-niger
#14
Kelley Sams
This article uses ethnographic research to reflect upon how the treatment of 'everyday' illnesses in Niger engages concepts of social identity. Inspired by Bourdieu's concept of social distinction, as well as Appadurai's edited volume on the 'social lives' of 'things', I present an analysis of how medications are understood by their users in terms of social and ideological meaning in one rural Hausa village. Decisions about medication choice were framed by three main themes: belonging to the 'modern' world, 'traditional' Hausa culture, and religious identity...
April 20, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425117/dream-homes-and-dead-ends-in-the-city-a-photo-essay-experiment
#15
Danya Fast
Research focused on the relationship between place and health demonstrates that it is complex and shifting, as overlapping social, historical, institutional and political and economic processes continually transform the landscapes in which lived experiences are embedded. Understanding this relationship requires knowledge of the situated meanings and local worlds that ethnographic methods are well suited to investigate. However, even conventional ethnographic methods can be inadequate to capture the embodied, lived experience of place - experiences in which the sensory and inner processes of memory and imagination are often privileged...
April 20, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425115/-it-seems-like-you-re-going-around-in-circles-recurrent-biographical-disruption-constructed-through-the-past-present-and-anticipated-future-in-the-narratives-of-young-adults-with-inflammatory-bowel-disease
#16
Benjamin Saunders
Biographical disruption and related concepts continue to be widely drawn upon in explaining how individuals experience chronic illness. Through in-depth examination of the narrative experiences of two young adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), this article aims to contribute to the continuing theoretical elaboration of biographical disruption, and in turn offer new insights into how young adults experience this condition. The cases are analysed from an interaction-based, constructionist perspective, through which it is argued that the relapse-remission nature of IBD can give rise to a particular form of recurrent biographical disruption, constructed in narrative through a complex configuration of past, present and anticipated future experiences...
April 20, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425112/beyond-guidelines-discretionary-practice-in-face-to-face-triage-nursing
#17
Lars E F Johannessen
This article draws on ethnographic data from a Norwegian emergency primary care clinic (EPCC) to explore nurses' discretionary application of guidelines. Specifically, it analyses nurses' discretionary use of the Manchester Triage System (MTS) when performing face-to-face triage, that is, assessing the urgency of patients' complaints. The analysis shows how nurses assessed patients at odds with MTS prescriptions by collecting supplementary data, engaging in differential diagnostic and holistic reasoning, relying on emotion and intuition, and allowing colleagues and patients to influence their reasoning...
April 20, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425106/the-concept-of-medicalisation-reassessed-a-response-to-joan-busfield
#18
Simon J Williams, Catherine Coveney, Jonathan Gabe
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 20, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425103/remains-of-care-opioid-substitution-treatment-in-the-post-welfare-state
#19
Anna Leppo, Riikka Perälä
This article examines how the amplified role of pharmaceutical substances in addiction treatment affects the everyday realisation of care, particularly the relationship between workers and patients, in so called austere environments. Theoretically the article draws firstly on the literature that links pharmaceuticalisation to the neoliberal undoing of central public structures and institutions of care, and secondly on Anne-Marie Mol's concept of the logic of care. Based on an ethnographic analysis of the everyday life at a Finnish opioid substitution treatment clinic we show the mechanisms through which the realisation of pharmacotherapy can, in the current political climate, result in a very narrow understanding of drug problems and minimal human contact between patients and professionals...
April 19, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28422296/keeping-out-and-getting-in-reframing-emergency-department-gatekeeping-as-structural-competence
#20
Mara Buchbinder
Sociologists have tended to frame medical gatekeeping as an exclusionary social practice, delineating how practitioners and clerical staff police the moral boundaries of medicine by keeping out patients who are categorised as 'bad', 'deviant', or otherwise problematic. Yet medical gatekeeping, understood more broadly, can include not only keeping patients out of particular clinical settings, but also redirecting them to alternative sources of care. In this article, I draw on qualitative analysis of audio-recorded patient-provider interactions in a United States emergency department (ED) to illustrate medical gatekeeping as a two-step process of, first, categorising certain patient complaints as unsuitable for treatment within a particular setting, and second, diverting patients to alternative sites for care...
April 19, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
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