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Sociology of Health & Illness

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332206/contract-care-in-dentistry-sense-making-of-the-concept-and-in-practice-when-multiple-institutional-logics-are-at-play
#1
Ylva Ulfsdotter Eriksson, Karin Berg, Ulla Wide Boman, Magnus Hakeberg
In 2009 contract dental care was introduced into Sweden's Public Dental Service under a programme called Dental Care for Health (DCH). Previous research has revealed a possible dilemma whereby dental care professionals had the role of insurance agent foisted upon them, as they were assigned the task of 'selling contracts'. Using qualitative interviews, this study explores how these professionals make sense of contract dental care today. Drawing on the concepts of occupational and organisational professionalism, in combination with the institutional logics perspective, we discern that dental care professionals are entangled in multiple rationalities when reasoning about and dealing with DCH...
March 23, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332203/margins-of-freedom-a-field-theoretic-approach-to-class-based-health-dispositions-and-practices
#2
Patrick John Burnett, Gerry Veenstra
Pierre Bourdieu's theory of practice situates social practices in the relational interplay between experiential mental phenomena (habitus), resources (capitals) and objective social structures (fields). When applied to class-based practices in particular, the overarching field of power within which social classes are potentially made manifest is the primary field of interest. Applying relational statistical techniques to original survey data from Toronto and Vancouver, Canada, we investigated whether smoking, engaging in physical activity and consuming fruit and vegetables are dispersed in a three-dimensional field of power shaped by economic and cultural capitals and cultural dispositions and practices...
March 23, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332197/music-making-for-health-and-wellbeing-in-youth-justice-settings-mediated-affordances-and-the-impact-of-context-and-social-relations
#3
Norma Daykin, Nick de Viggiani, Yvonne Moriarty, Paul Pilkington
Young people in the criminal justice system experience significant health and wellbeing issues that often stem from poverty and disadvantage and, in turn, are linked with offending and reoffending behaviour. There is ongoing interest in interventions such as participatory music programmes that seek to foster social reintegration, support mental wellbeing and equip young offenders with life skills, competencies and emotional resilience. However, there is a need for a situated understanding of both positive and negative experiences that shape potential outcomes of music projects...
March 23, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326556/digital-atmospheres-affective-practices-of-care-in-elefriends
#4
Ian M Tucker, Lewis Goodings
This article develops the concept of digital atmosphere to analyse the affective power of social media to shape practices of care and support for people living with mental distress. Using contemporary accounts of affective atmospheres, the article focuses on feelings of distress, support and care that unfold through digital atmospheres. The power of social media intersects with people's support and care-seeking practices in multiple ways and not in a straightforward model of 'accessing or providing support'...
March 22, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326555/ultrasound-as-a-technology-of-reassurance-how-pregnant-women-and-health-care-professionals-articulate-ultrasound-reassurance-and-its-limitations
#5
Gareth M Thomas, Julie Roberts, Frances E Griffiths
The premise that ultrasound technologies provide reassurance for pregnant women is well-rehearsed. However, there has been little research about how this reassurance is articulated and understood by both expectant mothers and health care professionals. In this article, we draw on two qualitative UK studies to explore the salience of ultrasound reassurance to women's pregnancy experiences whilst highlighting issues around articulation and silence. Specifically, we capture how expectant parents express a general need for reassurance and how visualisation and the conduct of professionals have a crucial role to play in accomplishing a sense of reassurance...
March 22, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28276069/two-regimes-of-hiv-aids-the-mmwr-and-the-socio-political-construction-of-hiv-aids-as-a-black-disease
#6
Kevin M Moseby
Over the course of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, black Americans have become a central target of US public health prevention efforts. And today, HIV/AIDS is understood to disproportionally affect black Americans. This markedly contrasts with knowledge about the disease and efforts to prevent it in the first decade of the epidemic in the US, when expert and lay understandings and responses centred on white gay males. This article demonstrates that explaining these historical reversals as purely reflective of epidemiological data - or best knowledge available - is insufficient...
March 9, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28271530/-it-s-like-taking-a-bit-of-masculinity-away-from-you-towards-a-theoretical-understanding-of-men-s-experiences-of-infertility
#7
Alan Dolan, Tim Lomas, Tarek Ghobara, Geraldine Hartshorne
In the UK, nearly half of all cases of infertility involve a 'male-factor'. Yet, little empirical work has explored how men as men negotiate this terrain. Three interrelated concepts; 'hegemonic masculinity', 'embodied masculinity' and the linkages between 'masculinities' and male help-seeking, provide the theoretical framework that guided a qualitative study conducted with 22 men experiencing infertility. The paper explores men's propensity to delay their help-seeking in relation to infertility despite their desire for children...
March 8, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28271522/the-limits-of-intensive-feeding-maternal-foodwork-at-the-intersections-of-race-class-and-gender
#8
Joslyn Brenton
Despite experiencing numerous barriers, mothers today confront increasing social pressure to embody perfection through their foodwork. A growing body of social science research identifies how gender and class inequality shape women's perceptions of food and their feeding strategies, but this research is thus far limited in its understanding of the roles that race and ethnic identity play in a mother's food landscape. Drawing on 60 in-depth interviews with a racially and economically diverse group of mothers, this paper examines how feeding young children is intertwined with contemporary ideas about child health as well as women's efforts to negotiate race, class, and gender hierarchies...
March 8, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28271518/have-we-seen-the-geneticisation-of-society-expectations-and-evidence
#9
Kate Weiner, Paul Martin, Martin Richards, Richard Tutton
Abby Lippman's geneticisation thesis, of the early 1990s, argued and anticipated that with the rise of genetics, increasing areas of social and health related activities would come to be understood and defined in genetic terms leading to major changes in society, medicine and health care. We review the considerable literature on geneticisation and consider how the concept stands both theoretically and empirically across scientific, clinical, popular and lay discourse and practice. Social science scholarship indicates that relatively little of the original claim of the geneticisation thesis has been realised, highlighting the development of more complex and dynamic accounts of disease in scientific discourse and the complexity of relationships between bioscientific, clinical and lay understandings...
March 8, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28239872/-betwixt-and-between-liminality-in-recovery-stories-from-people-with-myalgic-encephalomyelitis-me-or-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-cfs
#10
Brian Brown, Kate Huszar, Rosemary Chapman
This paper explores experiences of 16 people claiming to have recovered from Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) using the concept of liminality. Liminality describes the status of those falling between socially recognised and medically sanctioned categories, and illuminates both the experience of illness and the process of recovery from ME/CFS. The liminality experienced during illness was akin to that described by Turner with a degree of communitas among sufferers. As recovery progressed, participants stressed the percentage to which they had improved, and compared themselves with peers and themselves prior to the illness...
February 27, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28236330/contesting-lifestyle-risk-and-gendering-coronary-candidacy-lay-epidemiology-of-heart-disease-in-finland-in-the-1970s
#11
Mikko Jauho
This study addresses two issues currently under critical discussion in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), the relative neglect of women and the individualised nature of key risk factors. It focuses on the North Karelia project (NKP), a community programme aimed at coronary heart disease (CHD) prevention in a predominantly rural Finnish region in the early 1970s, that is, during a period when the epidemiological understanding of CVD still was relatively new and actively promoted. Adopting the notions of lay epidemiology and coronary candidacy, culturally mediated explanatory models lay people use to assess who is likely to develop heart disease and why, the study shows that locals targeted by the project critically engaged with both of these bias...
February 24, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28164318/-doing-good-by-proxy-human-animal-kinship-and-the-donation-of-canine-blood
#12
Vanessa Ashall, Pru Hobson-West
This article demonstrates the relevance of animals to medical sociology by arguing that pet owners' accounts of veterinary decision-making can highlight key sociological themes which are important to both human and animal health. Based on semi-structured interviews, the article argues that interspecies 'kinship' allows for the extension of sociological claims regarding altruism, self-interest and mutuality from human blood donation to companion animal blood 'donation'. Furthermore, this study extends sociological understanding of the human-animal bond by showing how the dog's status as kin meant they were expected to donate blood, and that the act of donation itself represents an important opportunity for family 'display'...
February 6, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28052343/the-concept-of-medicalisation-reassessed
#13
Joan Busfield
Medicalisation has been an important concept in sociological discussions of medicine since its adoption by medical sociologists in the early 1970s. Yet it has been criticised by some sociologists, in part because it seems too negative about medicine, and modified or replaced by others with concepts deemed more relevant like biomedicalisation and pharmaceuticalisation. My aim in this paper is to reassess the concept and consider whether it still has value in exploring significant aspects of the role of medicine in present-day society...
January 4, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28297084/changing-tastes-learning-hunger-and-fullness-after-gastric-bypass-surgery
#14
Line Hillersdal, Bodil J Christensen, Lotte Holm
Gastric bypass surgery is a specific medical technology that alters the body in ways that force patients to fundamentally change their eating habits. When patients enrol for surgery, they enter a learning process, encountering new and at times contested ways of sensing their bodies, tasting, and experiencing hunger and fullness. In this paper, we explore how patients begin to eat again after gastric bypass surgery. The empirical data used here are drawn from a Danish fieldwork study of individuals undergoing obesity surgery...
March 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27859354/public-challenge-and-endorsement-of-sex-category-ambiguity-in-online-debate-the-sooner-people-stop-thinking-that-gender-is-a-matter-of-choice-the-better
#15
Helen Sweeting, Matthew William Maycock, Laura Walker, Kate Hunt
Despite academic feminist debate over several decades, the binary nature of sex as a (perhaps the) primary social classification is often taken for granted, as is the assumption that individuals can be unproblematically assigned a biological sex at birth. This article presents analysis of online debate on the BBC news website in November 2013, comprising 864 readers' responses to an article entitled 'Germany allows 'indeterminate' gender at birth'. It explores how discourse reflecting Western essentialist beliefs about people having one sex or 'the other' is maintained in debates conducted in this online public space...
March 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27813115/the-articulation-of-neoliberalism-narratives-of-experience-of-chronic-illness-management-in-bulgaria-and-the-uk
#16
Ivaylo Vassilev, Anne Rogers, Elka Todorova, Anne Kennedy, Poli Roukova
The shift from social democratic to a neoliberal consensus in modern welfare capitalist states is characterised by an emphasis on individual responsibility, consumer choice, market rationality and growing social inequalities. There has been little exploration of how neoliberalism has shaped the environment within which chronic illness is experienced and managed. This article explores the different articulations of neoliberalism manifest in the arena of personal illness management in Bulgaria and the UK. People with type 2 diabetes discussed their experiences in terms of struggling with diet, diabetes as a personal failure, integrating illness management and valued activities, and the trustworthiness of the healthcare system...
March 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27770450/enabling-and-controlling-parenthood-in-publicly-provided-maternity-healthcare-becoming-a-parent-in-finland
#17
Riikka Homanen
This article discusses practices of parental support in the maternity healthcare provided by the welfare state. Drawing on ethnographic material from clinics in Finland, I discuss maternity healthcare practices and processes as the specific contexts of subjectification to parenthood in the Nordic welfare state. The analysis shows that in both nurses' (work) experience-based knowledge and population-statistical knowledge, parental competence is achieved largely through the 'natural' process of experiencing pregnant life...
March 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27770437/death-in-the-clinic-women-s-perceptions-and-experiences-of-discarding-supernumerary-ivf-embryos
#18
Sheryl de Lacey
Perspectives on the status of human embryos and whether they should be discarded differ globally. Some countries protect embryos in law while in other countries embryos 'die' or 'succumb' in assisted reproductive technology clinics on a daily basis. This study analyses interview data drawn from a larger qualitative study conducted in South Australia from 2004-2007. 21 women and 12 of 21 partners were interviewed about the decision they made to discard their embryos. The analysis reported here sought to examine the ways in which women constructed and experienced the decision to discard embryos...
March 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27726159/nurses-and-electronic-health-records-in-a-canadian-hospital-examining-the-social-organisation-and-programmed-use-of-digitised-nursing-knowledge
#19
Marie L Campbell, Janet M Rankin
Institutional ethnography (IE) is used to examine transformations in a professional nurse's work associated with her engagement with a hospital's electronic health record (EHR) which is being updated to integrate professional caregiving and produce more efficient and effective health care. We review in the technical and scholarly literature the practices and promises of information technology and, especially of its applications in health care, finding useful the more critical and analytic perspectives. Among the latter, scholarship on the activities of economising is important to our inquiry into the actual activities that transform 'things' (in our case, nursing knowledge and action) into calculable information for objective and financially relevant decision-making...
March 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27726151/complete-tooth-loss-as-status-passage
#20
Barry John Gibson, Philip V Sussex, Ruth P Fitzgerald, William Murray Thomson
The aim of this article is to add to the literature on the sociology of oral health and dentistry by presenting the relevance of status passage to the study of complete tooth loss. The article reports on an analysis of data taken from participants residing in the Nelson region of New Zealand. In total the data include interviews from 20 participants, all of whom had their remaining natural teeth removed before 1960. In total, 12 women and eight men were interviewed. All were from a European background with an age range of 71 to 101 years...
March 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
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