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Sociology of Health & Illness

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29790195/a-licence-to-drive-neurological-illness-loss-and-disruption
#1
Melissa Stepney, Susan Kirkpatrick, Louise Locock, Suman Prinjha, Sara Ryan
The sense of freedom and independence that being able to drive generates may be taken for granted by many until it is threatened by illness. Drawing on the 'mobility turn' in social sciences that emphasises the social and emotional significance of the car (Sheller and Urry , ), this article presents secondary analysis of narratives of driving and its significance across four neurological conditions (epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, transient ischaemic attack and motor neurone disease). Taking an interactionist approach we explore how the withdrawal of a driving licence can represent not just a practical and emotional loss of independence, but also loss of enjoyment; of a sense and feeling of 'normal' adulthood and social participation; and of an identity (in some cases gendered) of strength and power...
May 22, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29785717/the-place-of-abortion-in-the-pregnancy-decision-making-process-in-young-adult-women-in-catalonia-spain
#2
Laia Ferrer Serret, Montserrat Solsona Pairó
Induced abortion is one option to control fertility in Spain. Young adult women (25-34 years old) show a different abortion pattern compared to women in other age groups, being less likely to seek abortions than younger women and having one of the lowest proportions of unintended pregnancies. We aimed to analyse the factors involved in the pregnancy decision-making process to better understand why young adult women seek abortions in Catalonia, Spain. In-depth semi-structured interviews with 25 nulliparous pregnant young adult women and one focus group discussion with healthcare providers were conducted in 2008/2010...
May 21, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29781196/professionalised-intimacy-how-dementia-care-workers-navigate-between-domestic-intimacy-and-institutional-detachment
#3
Tobias Haeusermann
This article reports an ethnographic study of the handover routines in Germany's first dementia village, with a central focus on how care is balanced between domestic intimacy and institutional detachment. The term 'professionalised intimacy' is used for the vivid interplay between comfort and intimacy that renders the interaction between care workers and residents far more complex than previous theories have articulated. Because of the intimacy involved in community building, however, the promise of personalised care must clash with the bureaucratic structures of an official institution, potentially depriving the care workers of their public, respected identity in the process...
May 20, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29770968/-if-i-can-walk-that-far-space-and-embodiment-in-stories-of-illness-and-recovery
#4
Emily Heavey
Illness and recovery transform embodied experience, and transform the experience of space. Space, in turn, is a valuable resource in the telling of an illness narrative. Starting from a phenomenological perspective that takes the body to be the centre of experience, and hence of selfhood and storytelling, this article offers an argument for and an approach to analysing space as a narrative resource in stories about illness and recovery. Using a case study of one woman's stories about her amputation, it demonstrates how both narrated space and narrating space can be used as devices to structure the narrative and position its characters and interlocutors to construct the narrator's embodied experiences and identities...
May 17, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29770448/eating-practices-among-low-income-overweight-obese-brazilian-mothers-a-bourdieusian-approach
#5
Priscila de Morais Sato, Mariana Dimitrov Ulian, Ramiro Fernandez Unsain, Fernanda Baeza Scagliusi
We investigated the eating practices of socially vulnerable overweight and obese Brazilian mothers, exploring the relationships between eating practices, capitals, fields and excess-weight. We conducted a qualitative study involving in-depth interviews of 21 women living in three vulnerable urban regions. Content analyses were performed and codes were used to locate actors in relation to each other in terms of 'capitals' and 'fields', forming a typology based on Bourdieu's theory with five groups. Socioeconomic conditions during childhood and liking to cook were the main characteristics related to each group's distinct eating practices...
May 16, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29740838/the-politics-of-ageing-health-consumers-markets-and-hegemonic-challenge
#6
Brian Salter, Charlotte Salter
In recent years ageing has travelled from the placid backwaters of politics into the mainstream of economic, social and cultural debate. What are the forces that have politicised ageing, creating a sustained opposition to the supply side hegemony of pharmaceuticals, medicine and state which has historically constructed, propagated and legitimised the understanding of ageing as decline in social worth? In addressing this question, the paper develops Gramsci's theory of hegemony to include the potentially disruptive demand side power of consumers and markets...
May 8, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29707795/harmless-friendly-and-lethal-antibiotic-misuse-in-relation-to-the-unpredictable-bacterium-group-a-streptococcus
#7
Hedvig Gröndal
Evidence-based treatment guidelines for managing infections in health care are promoted as tools to prevent unnecessary use of antibiotics. Antibiotic misuse has been examined as regards the doctor-patient relation and the social context of medical practice. Less attention has been paid to how the very conceptualisation of human-microbial relations may influence understandings of antibiotic misuse. The article examines a medical controversy concerning guidelines for managing throat infection and antibiotic treatment in Sweden...
April 29, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29701241/-essentially-it-s-just-a-lot-of-bedrooms-architectural-design-prescribed-personalisation-and-the-construction-of-care-homes-for-later-life
#8
Sarah Nettleton, Christina Buse, Daryl Martin
This article draws on ethnographic data from a UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) funded study called 'Buildings in the Making'. The project aims to open up the black box of architectural work to explore what happens between the commissioning of architectural projects through to the construction of buildings, and seeks to understand how ideas about care for later life are operationalised into designs. Drawing on recent scholarship on 'materialities of care' and 'practising architectures', which emphasise the salience of material objects for understanding the politics and practices of care, we focus here on 'beds'...
April 27, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29700832/-ingredients-of-a-supportive-web-of-caring-relationships-at-the-end-of-life-findings-from-a-community-research-project-in-austria
#9
Klaus Wegleitner, Patrick Schuchter, Sonja Prieth
In accordance with the pluralisation of life plans in late modernity, the societal organisation of care at the end of life is diverse. Although the public discourse in western societies is dominated by questions about optimising specialised palliative care services, public health approaches, which take into account the social determinants and inequalities in end-of-life care, have gained in importance over the last decade. Conceptual aspects, dimensions of impact and benefit for the dying and their communities are well discussed in the public health end-of-life care research literature...
April 27, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29675960/translating-value-based-health-care-an-experiment-into-healthcare-governance-and-dialogical-accountability
#10
Morten Bonde, Claus Bossen, Peter Danholt
This article analyses an experiment into healthcare governance in Denmark inspired by principles of value-based health care and intended to re-orient the focus of healthcare governance from 'productivity' to 'value for the patient'. The region in charge of the experiment exempted nine hospital departments from activity-based financing and accountability based on diagnosis-related groups, which allegedly incentivised hospitals in 'perverse' and counterproductive ways. Instead, the departments were to develop new indicators from their local practices to support and account for quality and value for the patient...
April 19, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29671885/-i-expected-just-to-walk-in-get-my-tablets-and-then-walk-out-on-framing-new-community-pharmacy-services-in-the-english-healthcare-system
#11
Asam Latif, Justin Waring, Deborah Watmough, Matthew J Boyd, Rachel A Elliott
Reconfiguration of the healthcare division of labour is becoming increasingly attractive in the context of increased patient demand and resource constraints. One example is the introduction of extended roles for pharmacists to provide patients additional support to manage their medicines, while also reducing work pressures experienced by other health professionals. Understanding how such policies are framed by those delivering and receiving care has been under-theorised. Using Goffman's frame theory, we examine one newly introduced community pharmacy service (New Medicines Service (NMS)) to illustrate how a policy intended to support patient medicine-taking through the extended roles of pharmacists is framed and where this deviates from its proposed aims...
April 19, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29667209/narratives-of-illness-and-offending-mentally-disordered-offenders-views-on-their-offending
#12
Jeremy Dixon
Narratives have been used in both the sociology of health and illness and in criminology to examine how groups of people present themselves in moral terms. This article focuses on the narratives of offenders with mental health problems in England subject to section 37/41 of the Mental Health Act 1983 to examine how they justified offending prior to admission. Participants presented illness in a variety of different ways indicating a range of moral positions towards offending. In line with previous research a first group used mental illness to excuse offending and saw themselves as achieving moral reform through treatment...
April 18, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29667210/pastoral-power-and-the-promotion-of-self-care
#13
Lorelei Jones
In many countries government policy is becoming increasingly reliant on citizens taking greater responsibility for their health and wellbeing and limiting their consumption of public services. In this paper I develop Foucauldian perspectives on the work required to create and maintain responsibilised subjects, focusing on the role of 'pastors' - specialists, experts and therapists who promote desirable subjectivities (Waring and Latif ). Drawing from ethnographic research, I consider how government policies for the promotion of self-care within the English healthcare system not only place increased emphasis on patients taking responsibility for their own health and wellbeing, but also seek to constitute new pastoral subjectivities as responsible for conducting the conduct of patients...
April 17, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29664119/e-cigarettes-vaping-and-performativity-in-the-context-of-tobacco-denormalisation
#14
Mark Lucherini, Catriona Rooke, Amanda Amos
E-cigarettes are devices through which a nicotine solution is 'vapourised' and inhaled by the user. Unlike cigarettes, the process involves no tobacco combustion. However, the inhalation and exhalation of vapour is reminiscent of smoking and there is debate about the possible harms and benefits of e-cigarette use, including the 'renormalisation' of smoking. Despite these debates, there has been little exploration into the embodied and semiotic similarities between smoking and vaping. This paper views the practices of vaping and smoking through the lens of performativity that is, the accumulation of meaning associated with the habits over time and space...
April 17, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29664118/narratives-and-gatekeeping-making-sense-of-triage-nurses-practice
#15
Lars E F Johannessen
It is well documented that emergency service staff consider some patients to be 'inappropriate attenders'. A central example is 'trivia', denoting patients with medical problems considered too 'trivial' to warrant attention. Although research has repeatedly shown that frontline staff violate guidelines in turning away 'trivial' patients, existing research has paid insufficient attention to why staff are willing to engage in guideline-violating gatekeeping, which may put both themselves and 'trivial' patients at risk...
April 17, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29687894/giving-up-sugar-and-the-inequalities-of-abstinence
#16
Karen Throsby
Sugar is increasingly supplanting fat as public enemy number one in public health campaigns, and calls for significant reductions in consumption have provided fertile ground for the proliferation of popular texts and services advocating sugar abstention. This article explores three modes of popular sugar abstention (evangelical, experimental and charitable). These vary in chronology, philosophy and the intensity of abstention, but all serve as sites of identity production and self-entrepreneurship for those able to advocate for, and engage with, them...
April 16, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29663446/dualities-of-dementia-illness-narratives-and-their-role-in-a-narrative-economy
#17
Alexandra Hillman, Ian Rees Jones, Catherine Quinn, Sharon M Nelis, Linda Clare
The concept of 'narrative economies' has recently been proposed as a set of exchange relationships that, through biography and story-telling, facilitate access to resources and act as a source of value. We utilise this concept to inform our analysis of 18 qualitative interviews with five people with dementia and four informal carers. Our participants are members of a pre-existing group of dementia advocates, representing the voices of those living with the condition. There are a growing number of people in the early stages of dementia - like our participants - being called upon to account for their experience, as a means of developing a politicised 'collective illness identity'...
April 16, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29659032/at-with-and-beyond-risk-expectations-of-living-with-the-possibility-of-future-dementia
#18
Richard Milne, Ana Diaz, Shirlene Badger, Eline Bunnik, Karine Fauria, Katie Wells
Biomedical research aimed at the development of therapies for chronic and late-onset conditions increasingly concentrates on the early treatment of symptom-less disease. This broad trend is evidenced in prominent shifts in contemporary dementia research. Revised diagnostic criteria and new approaches to clinical trials propose a focus on earlier stages of disease and prompt concerns about the implications of communicating test results associated with the risk of developing dementia when no effective treatments are available...
April 16, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29633278/controlling-food-controlling-relationships-exploring-the-meanings-and-dynamics-of-family-food-practices-through-the-diary-interview-approach
#19
Sarah MacDonald, Simon Murphy, Eva Elliott
Potential merits of a social practice perspective for examining the meanings and dynamics of family food include moving beyond individual behaviour, and exploring how practices emerge, develop and change. However, researchers have struggled to encourage reflection on mundane practices, and how to understand associated meanings. Drawing on a study of families in South Wales, this article reflects on the value of the diary-interview approach in addressing these methodological challenges, and aims to explore and understand the dynamics of control across family contexts...
April 6, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29626356/fit-to-father-online-accounts-of-lifestyle-changes-and-help-seeking-on-a-male-infertility-board
#20
Esmée Hanna, Brendan Gough, Nicky Hudson
The reproductive realm is routinely viewed as a feminised space requiring women's commitment and labour. By contrast, men's procreative contributions and 'reproductive masculinity' is represented as unproblematic, with men assumed to be fertile across the lifespan. Recent scientific research has, however, cast doubt over these longstanding assumptions, suggesting that a link does exist between 'lifestyle' factors and male fertility. The notion that fertility can be improved with effort (for both women and men) can be located within wider cultural and political shifts which construct individuals as increasingly responsible for acting on health messages and engaging in self-disciplining body projects...
April 6, 2018: Sociology of Health & Illness
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