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Sociology of Health & Illness

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28052343/the-concept-of-medicalisation-reassessed
#1
Joan Busfield
Medicalisation has been an important concept in sociological discussions of medicine since its adoption by medical sociologists in the early 1970s. Yet it has been criticised by some sociologists, in part because it seems too negative about medicine, and modified or replaced by others with concepts deemed more relevant like biomedicalisation and pharmaceuticalisation. My aim in this paper is to reassess the concept and consider whether it still has value in exploring significant aspects of the role of medicine in present-day society...
January 4, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28012200/obesity-bodily-change-and-health-identities-a-qualitative-study-of-canadian-women
#2
Andrea E Bombak, Lee F Monaghan
Medicalised concerns about an obesity crisis persist yet more needs to be learnt about everyday orientations to weight (loss). This article reports and analyses data generated using qualitative methods, including repeated interviews and fieldwork conducted over one year in Canada with women (n = 13) identifying as (formerly) obese. Three ideal types are explored using empirical data: (1) hopeful narratives; (2) disordered eating distress; and (3) weight-cycling or stagnation. Core themes include women's desire to embody a thin(ner) future and the good life, the harms of intentional weight-loss, and resignation to living as a fat woman whilst nonetheless challenging stigma...
December 24, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28012191/neither-foolish-nor-finished-identity-control-among-older-adults-with-hiv-in-rural-malawi
#3
Emily Freeman
Prevalence of HIV after age 50 is considerable, especially in southern Africa. Negative social constructions of HIV in older age, and the health consequences of ageing with the virus, mean that having HIV presents a challenge for many people's roles and social memberships, threatening to disrupt their sense of self. Using constructivist grounded theory and qualitative data from rural Malawi, this paper describes how older men and women deal with these identity challenges. Drawing on a symbolic interactionist framework, it uses identity control theory to explore how the study's participants presented their post-diagnosis behaviours in ways that maintained their most significant pre-diagnosis identities as 'adults', a label they gave to the core identity of being a person who belongs in the social world...
December 24, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27928829/mapping-the-illness-trajectories-of-insomnia-a-biographical-disruption
#4
Janet M Y Cheung, Bandana Saini, Delwyn J Bartlett, Tracey-Lea Laba, Paul H Mason
The insomnia illness experience can be conceptualised as a form of biographical disruption. Using a critical interpretive phenomenological lens 51 in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients from specialist sleep and psychology clinics (n = 22) and the general community (n = 29). Patients' narratives revealed key phases of their illness trajectories as they recognise, rethink and respond to insomnia. Their biographical events served as reference points for both patient groups to make sense of their illness experiences as they transitioned from a perceived state of sleeplessness to clinical insomnia...
December 7, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917505/might-constraint-be-compatible-with-care-home-care-as-a-situational-ethics
#5
Antoine Hennion, Pierre A Vidal-Naquet
Respecting the autonomy and will of people has legitimately led to strictly control the use of constraint in care activities, and promote a care ethics centred around people's needs and wills. But constraint is underlying in any action aiming at making people do something, even with their consent, especially when their ability to evaluate what is best for them may be altered. Ceaselessly present in care, this ordinary, silent constraint should not be only deemed as a necessary evil to be prevented. In contrast with this legally-based view, the paper adopts a pragmatic perspective...
December 5, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917504/constructing-and-enacting-kinship-in-sister-to-sister-egg-donation-families-a-multi-family-member-interview-study
#6
Hanna Van Parys, Veerle Provoost, Kristin Zeiler, Petra De Sutter, Guido Pennings, Ann Buysse
Although intra-familial egg donation has been practiced for more than 15 years in several countries, little is known about family relationships in this family type. Framed within the new kinship studies, this article focuses on the experiential dimension of kinship in sister-to-sister egg donation families: how is kinship 'unpacked' and 'reconstructed' in this specific family constellation? Qualitative data analysis of interviews with receiving parents, their donating sisters and the donor children revealed six themes: (1) being connected as an extended family; (2) disambiguating motherhood; (3) giving and receiving as structuring processes; (4) acknowledging and managing the 'special' link between donor and child; (5) making sense of the union between father and donor; and (6) kinship constructions being challenged...
December 5, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917494/disturbing-sleep-and-sleepfulness-during-recovery-from-substance-dependence-in-residential-rehabilitation-settings
#7
Sarah Nettleton, Robert Meadows, Joanne Neale
There is evidence that poor sleep mitigates recovery from substance dependence and increases risk of relapse. However, to date research literature is located within biomedical, clinical and psychological paradigms. To complement the extant work, this article offers a sociological exploration of sleep in the context of recovery from dependence on alcohol and/or other drugs. Drawing on qualitative data generated through interviews with 28 men and women living in residential rehabilitation settings in England, we provide a detailed exploration of sleep practices focusing on how these are enacted throughout the night...
December 5, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27910120/at-the-margins-of-biomedicine-the-ambiguous-position-of-registered-medical-practitioners-in-rural-indian-healthcare
#8
Papreen Nahar, Nanda Kishore Kannuri, Sitamma Mikkilineni, G V S Murthy, Peter Phillimore
This analysis challenges a tendency in public health and the social sciences to associate India's medical pluralism with a distinction between biomedicine, as a homogeneous entity, and its non-biomedical 'others'. We argue that this overdrawn dichotomy obscures the important part played by 'informal' biomedical practice, an issue with salience well beyond India. Based on a qualitative study in rural Andhra Pradesh, South India, we focus on a figure little discussed in the academic literature - the Registered Medical Practitioner (RMP) - who occupies a niche in the medical market-place as an informal exponent of biomedical treatment...
December 2, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27910108/a-day-in-the-life-of-a-m%C3%A3-ni%C3%A3-re-s-patient-understanding-the-lived-experiences-and-mental-health-impacts-of-m%C3%A3-ni%C3%A3-re-s-disease
#9
Sarah L Bell, Jessica Tyrrell, Cassandra Phoenix
Concepts of social practice are increasingly being used to understand experiences of everyday life, particularly in relation to consumption and healthy lifestyles. This article builds on this in the context of lives disrupted and reshaped by chronic illness. It uses social practice theory to examine the lived experiences of individuals with Ménière's disease; a long-term progressive vestibular disorder, defined by episodes of severe and debilitating vertigo, aural fullness, tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss...
December 2, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27910107/gestating-times-women-s-accounts-of-the-temporalities-of-pregnancies-that-end-in-abortion-in-england
#10
Siân M Beynon-Jones
Tensions between the 'clock time' of medicine and the embodied times of its subjects are central to feminist writing concerning Western obstetric practice. In this article, I expand the focus of this literature by addressing the temporal dynamics of another site of reproductive healthcare: abortion provision. Echoing obstetric accounts of birth, time in legal, healthcare and social scientific discourse on abortion is routinely conceptualised as a finite resource contained within the pregnant/foetal body, which can be measured using clocks and calendars...
December 2, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27891628/power-empowerment-and-person-centred-care-using-ethnography-to-examine-the-everyday-practice-of-unregistered-dementia-care-staff
#11
Kezia Scales, Simon Bailey, Joanne Middleton, Justine Schneider
The social positioning and treatment of persons with dementia reflects dominant biomedical discourses of progressive and inevitable loss of insight, capacity, and personality. Proponents of person-centred care, by contrast, suggest that such loss can be mitigated within environments that preserve rather than undermine personhood. In formal organisational settings, person-centred approaches place particular responsibility on 'empowered' direct-care staff to translate these principles into practice. These staff provide the majority of hands-on care, but with limited training, recognition, or remuneration...
November 28, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27891627/narrative-collisions-sociocultural-pressures-and-dementia-the-relational-basis-of-personhood-reconsidered
#12
Edward Tolhurst, Bernhard Weicht, Paul Kingston
The concept of personhood developed by Tom Kitwood highlights that the experience of dementia has relational dimensions that transcend the neurodegenerative impacts of the condition. This relational focus, however, has been narrowly conceptualised, with the impact of broader sociocultural factors on experience underplayed. The empirical exploration of interaction also requires reinforcement: a tendency for dyadic studies to portray findings in an individualised format hinders the interrogation of interpersonal negotiations...
November 27, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27882568/the-evolution-of-weak-standards-the-case-of-the-swedish-rheumatology-quality-registry
#13
Anna Essén, Michael Sauder
Research in sociology suggests that the effects of standards are not nearly as straightforward or as homogenising as they first appear. The present study extends these insights by demonstrating how even standards designed simply to collect data can produce extensive and unanticipated effects in medical fields as their uses evolve across actors and contexts. We draw on an embedded case study exploring the multifaceted consequences of the use of a practice-driven voluntary documentation standard: the Swedish rheumatology quality registry from 1995-2014...
November 23, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27868201/assembling-activity-setting-participation-with-disabled-young-people
#14
Barbara E Gibson, Gillian King, Gail Teachman, Bhavnita Mistry, Yani Hamdani
Rehabilitation research investigating activity participation has been largely conducted in a realist tradition that under-theorises the relationship between persons, technologies, and socio-material places. In this Canadian study we used a post-critical approach to explore activity/setting participation with 19 young people aged 14 to 23 years with complex communication and/or mobility impairments. Methods included integrated photo-elicitation, interviews, and participant observations of community-based activities...
November 21, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27862018/what-is-wrong-with-being-a-pill-taker-the-special-case-of-statins
#15
Louisa Polak
In an interview study of decision-making about statins, many participants said they took pills regularly, yet described themselves as 'not really pill-takers'. This paper explores this paradox and its implications. The practice of pill-taking itself can constitute a challenge to the presentation of moral adequacy, beyond the potential for rendering stigmatised illnesses visible. Meeting this challenge involves a complex process of calibrating often-conflicting moral imperatives: to be concerned, but not too concerned, over one's health; to be informed, but not over-informed; and deferential but not over-deferential to medical expertise...
November 16, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27859354/public-challenge-and-endorsement-of-sex-category-ambiguity-in-online-debate-the-sooner-people-stop-thinking-that-gender-is-a-matter-of-choice-the-better
#16
Helen Sweeting, Matthew William Maycock, Laura Walker, Kate Hunt
Despite academic feminist debate over several decades, the binary nature of sex as a (perhaps the) primary social classification is often taken for granted, as is the assumption that individuals can be unproblematically assigned a biological sex at birth. This article presents analysis of online debate on the BBC news website in November 2013, comprising 864 readers' responses to an article entitled 'Germany allows 'indeterminate' gender at birth'. It explores how discourse reflecting Western essentialist beliefs about people having one sex or 'the other' is maintained in debates conducted in this online public space...
November 16, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27862007/disentangling-patient-and-public-involvement-in-healthcare-decisions-why-the-difference-matters
#17
Mio Fredriksson, Jonathan Q Tritter
Patient and public involvement has become an integral aspect of many developed health systems and is judged to be an essential driver for reform. However, little attention has been paid to the distinctions between patients and the public, and the views of patients are often seen to encompass those of the general public. Using an ideal-type approach, we analyse crucial distinctions between patient involvement and public involvement using examples from Sweden and England. We highlight that patients have sectional interests as health service users in contrast to citizens who engage as a public policy agent reflecting societal interests...
November 11, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27813115/the-articulation-of-neoliberalism-narratives-of-experience-of-chronic-illness-management-in-bulgaria-and-the-uk
#18
Ivaylo Vassilev, Anne Rogers, Elka Todorova, Anne Kennedy, Poli Roukova
The shift from social democratic to a neoliberal consensus in modern welfare capitalist states is characterised by an emphasis on individual responsibility, consumer choice, market rationality and growing social inequalities. There has been little exploration of how neoliberalism has shaped the environment within which chronic illness is experienced and managed. This article explores the different articulations of neoliberalism manifest in the arena of personal illness management in Bulgaria and the UK. People with type 2 diabetes discussed their experiences in terms of struggling with diet, diabetes as a personal failure, integrating illness management and valued activities, and the trustworthiness of the healthcare system...
November 4, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27813121/family-social-capital-and-health-a-systematic-review-and-redirection
#19
Elena Carrillo Alvarez, Ichiro Kawachi, Jordi Riera Romani
The level (or scale) at which social capital can be conceptualised and measured ranges potentially from the macro-level (regional or country level), to the meso-level (neighbourhoods, workplaces, schools), down to the individual level. However, one glaring gap in the conceptualisation of social capital within the empirical literature has been the level of the family. Our aim in this review is to examine the family as the 'missing level' in studies on social capital and health. To do so, we conducted a systematic review on the use and measurement of this notion in the health literature, with the final intention of articulating a direction for future research in the field...
November 3, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27791267/a-narrative-analysis-of-the-birth-stories-of-early-age-mothers
#20
Anna Carson, Cathy Chabot, Devon Greyson, Kate Shannon, Putu Duff, Jean Shoveller
The telling of birth stories (i.e. stories that describe women's experiences of giving birth) is a common and important social practice. Whereas most research on birth narratives reflects the stories of middle-class, 'adult' women, we examine how the birth stories told by early-age mothers interconnect with broader narratives regarding social stigma and childbearing at 'too early' an age. Drawing on narrative theory, we analyse in-depth interviews with 81 mothers (ages 15-24 years) conducted in Greater Vancouver and Prince George, Canada, in 2014-15...
October 28, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
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