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Sociology of Health & Illness

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543619/the-company-you-keep-is-socialising-with-higher-status-people-bad-for-mental-health
#1
Min-Ah Lee, Ichiro Kawachi
Socialising with higher-status individuals can be hypothesised to exert opposing influences on the mental health of the ego. On the one hand, socialising with higher-status alters might enable individuals to access valuable resources. On the other hand, status-discrepant friendships could be detrimental to mental health by engendering feelings of unfairness. We sought to examine the impact of status-discrepant social relationships on depressive symptoms in the 2012 Korean General Social Survey (KGSS), a nationally representative sample...
May 24, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543376/the-everyday-risk-work-of-dutch-child-healthcare-professionals-inferring-safe-and-good-parenting-through-trust-as-mediated-by-a-lens-of-gender-and-class
#2
Gerlieke Veltkamp, Patrick Brown
Amidst intensifying policy concerns with children's wellbeing and development, healthcare professionals are required not only to assess risk of abuse and neglect, but to manage risk of 'poor parenting' more broadly. Drawing on 15 in-depth interviews and non-participant observations of 61 professional-family interactions, across four preventative public health services for children in the Netherlands, we explored how professionals accomplished such risk work amid intractable uncertainties. Building inferences from brief encounters with families, professionals gauged the extent to which they trusted parents to care 'appropriately'...
May 24, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28523700/balancing-medical-accuracy-and-diagnostic-consequences-diagnosing-medically-unexplained-symptoms-in-primary-care
#3
Erik B Rasmussen
Focusing on the case of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS), this article explores diagnostic classification in the absence of biomedical evidence or other strong medical warrants for diagnosis. The data are from three focus group interviews with Norwegian general practitioners (GPs) conducted in 2015, that centred on the issue of what diagnoses to use (or not) for MUS. The qualitative analysis reconstructs the logic underlying GPs' diagnostic accounts, which centred on the meaning of diagnostic categories and on anticipating how 'generalised others' would respond to those meanings (called 'diagnosing by anticipation')...
May 18, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28503755/wanting-to-work-managing-the-sick-role-in-high-stake-sickness-insurance-meetings
#4
Marie Flinkfeldt
This article respecifies and develops Parsons's sick role theory, focusing on the postulate that the sick person must 'want' to get well. Using conversation analysis and discursive psychology to study how the psychological term 'want' is used in high-stake, multi-professional meetings with sickness benefit claimants in Sweden, the article shows how establishing that one 'wants' to get well requires extensive interactional work. In the examined meetings, the sick person's 'want' formulations make explicit the relationship between 'wants' and illness or inabilities, thus allowing for motivational character to be established without committing to its implications, and without appearing strategic or biased...
May 15, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425136/molecularisation-and-metaphor
#5
David Armstrong
This article explores the molecularisation of medicine thesis by investigating reports on genetics and molecular medicine in the New England Journal of Medicine. While there has indeed been a large increase in the number of references to molecules in the context of genetics over the last few decades these are mostly embedded in a framework of explanatory metaphors, namely (gene) expressivity, penetrance, regulation and pathways. As most of these metaphors are drawn from the social world it would appear that the molecularisation thesis - that social life is becoming dominated by the molecular - needs to be tempered by the ways in which understanding of that molecular world is itself a reflection of social life...
April 20, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425118/engaging-conceptions-of-identity-in-a-context-of-medical-pluralism-explaining-treatment-choices-for-everyday-illness-in-niger
#6
Kelley Sams
This article uses ethnographic research to reflect upon how the treatment of 'everyday' illnesses in Niger engages concepts of social identity. Inspired by Bourdieu's concept of social distinction, as well as Appadurai's edited volume on the 'social lives' of 'things', I present an analysis of how medications are understood by their users in terms of social and ideological meaning in one rural Hausa village. Decisions about medication choice were framed by three main themes: belonging to the 'modern' world, 'traditional' Hausa culture, and religious identity...
April 20, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425117/dream-homes-and-dead-ends-in-the-city-a-photo-essay-experiment
#7
Danya Fast
Research focused on the relationship between place and health demonstrates that it is complex and shifting, as overlapping social, historical, institutional and political and economic processes continually transform the landscapes in which lived experiences are embedded. Understanding this relationship requires knowledge of the situated meanings and local worlds that ethnographic methods are well suited to investigate. However, even conventional ethnographic methods can be inadequate to capture the embodied, lived experience of place - experiences in which the sensory and inner processes of memory and imagination are often privileged...
April 20, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425115/-it-seems-like-you-re-going-around-in-circles-recurrent-biographical-disruption-constructed-through-the-past-present-and-anticipated-future-in-the-narratives-of-young-adults-with-inflammatory-bowel-disease
#8
Benjamin Saunders
Biographical disruption and related concepts continue to be widely drawn upon in explaining how individuals experience chronic illness. Through in-depth examination of the narrative experiences of two young adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), this article aims to contribute to the continuing theoretical elaboration of biographical disruption, and in turn offer new insights into how young adults experience this condition. The cases are analysed from an interaction-based, constructionist perspective, through which it is argued that the relapse-remission nature of IBD can give rise to a particular form of recurrent biographical disruption, constructed in narrative through a complex configuration of past, present and anticipated future experiences...
April 20, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425112/beyond-guidelines-discretionary-practice-in-face-to-face-triage-nursing
#9
Lars E F Johannessen
This article draws on ethnographic data from a Norwegian emergency primary care clinic (EPCC) to explore nurses' discretionary application of guidelines. Specifically, it analyses nurses' discretionary use of the Manchester Triage System (MTS) when performing face-to-face triage, that is, assessing the urgency of patients' complaints. The analysis shows how nurses assessed patients at odds with MTS prescriptions by collecting supplementary data, engaging in differential diagnostic and holistic reasoning, relying on emotion and intuition, and allowing colleagues and patients to influence their reasoning...
April 20, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425106/the-concept-of-medicalisation-reassessed-a-response-to-joan-busfield
#10
Simon J Williams, Catherine Coveney, Jonathan Gabe
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 20, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425103/remains-of-care-opioid-substitution-treatment-in-the-post-welfare-state
#11
Anna Leppo, Riikka Perälä
This article examines how the amplified role of pharmaceutical substances in addiction treatment affects the everyday realisation of care, particularly the relationship between workers and patients, in so called austere environments. Theoretically the article draws firstly on the literature that links pharmaceuticalisation to the neoliberal undoing of central public structures and institutions of care, and secondly on Anne-Marie Mol's concept of the logic of care. Based on an ethnographic analysis of the everyday life at a Finnish opioid substitution treatment clinic we show the mechanisms through which the realisation of pharmacotherapy can, in the current political climate, result in a very narrow understanding of drug problems and minimal human contact between patients and professionals...
April 19, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28422296/keeping-out-and-getting-in-reframing-emergency-department-gatekeeping-as-structural-competence
#12
Mara Buchbinder
Sociologists have tended to frame medical gatekeeping as an exclusionary social practice, delineating how practitioners and clerical staff police the moral boundaries of medicine by keeping out patients who are categorised as 'bad', 'deviant', or otherwise problematic. Yet medical gatekeeping, understood more broadly, can include not only keeping patients out of particular clinical settings, but also redirecting them to alternative sources of care. In this article, I draw on qualitative analysis of audio-recorded patient-provider interactions in a United States emergency department (ED) to illustrate medical gatekeeping as a two-step process of, first, categorising certain patient complaints as unsuitable for treatment within a particular setting, and second, diverting patients to alternative sites for care...
April 19, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28369947/-fundamental-causes-of-inequalities-in-mortality-an-empirical-test-of-the-theory-in-20-european-populations
#13
Johan P Mackenbach, Caspar W N Looman, Barbara Artnik, Matthias Bopp, Patrick Deboosere, Chris Dibben, Ramune Kalediene, Katalin Kovács, Mall Leinsalu, Pekka Martikainen, Enrique Regidor, Jitka Rychtaříková, Rianne de Gelder
The 'fundamental causes' theory stipulates that when new opportunities for lowering mortality arise, higher socioeconomic groups will benefit more because of their greater material and non-material resources. We tested this theory using harmonised mortality data by educational level for 22 causes of death and 20 European populations from the period 1980-2010. Across all causes and populations, mortality on average declined by 2.49 per cent (95%CI: 2.04-2.92), 1.83% (1.37-2.30) and 1.34% (0.89-1.78) per annum among the high, mid and low educated, respectively...
March 31, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28349619/bridging-the-discursive-gap-between-lay-and-medical-discourse-in-care-coordination
#14
Rod Sheaff, Joyce Halliday, Richard Byng, John Øvretveit, Mark Exworthy, Stephen Peckham, Sheena Asthana
For older people with multiple chronic co-morbidities, strategies to coordinate care depend heavily on information exchange. We analyse the information-sharing difficulties arising from differences between patients' oral narratives and medical sense-making; and whether a modified form of 'narrative medicine' might mitigate them. We systematically compared 66 general practice patients' own narratives of their health problems and care with the contents of their clinical records. Data were collected in England during 2012-13...
March 28, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332206/contract-care-in-dentistry-sense-making-of-the-concept-and-in-practice-when-multiple-institutional-logics-are-at-play
#15
Ylva Ulfsdotter Eriksson, Karin Berg, Ulla Wide Boman, Magnus Hakeberg
In 2009 contract dental care was introduced into Sweden's Public Dental Service under a programme called Dental Care for Health (DCH). Previous research has revealed a possible dilemma whereby dental care professionals had the role of insurance agent foisted upon them, as they were assigned the task of 'selling contracts'. Using qualitative interviews, this study explores how these professionals make sense of contract dental care today. Drawing on the concepts of occupational and organisational professionalism, in combination with the institutional logics perspective, we discern that dental care professionals are entangled in multiple rationalities when reasoning about and dealing with DCH...
March 23, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332203/margins-of-freedom-a-field-theoretic-approach-to-class-based-health-dispositions-and-practices
#16
Patrick John Burnett, Gerry Veenstra
Pierre Bourdieu's theory of practice situates social practices in the relational interplay between experiential mental phenomena (habitus), resources (capitals) and objective social structures (fields). When applied to class-based practices in particular, the overarching field of power within which social classes are potentially made manifest is the primary field of interest. Applying relational statistical techniques to original survey data from Toronto and Vancouver, Canada, we investigated whether smoking, engaging in physical activity and consuming fruit and vegetables are dispersed in a three-dimensional field of power shaped by economic and cultural capitals and cultural dispositions and practices...
March 23, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332197/music-making-for-health-and-wellbeing-in-youth-justice-settings-mediated-affordances-and-the-impact-of-context-and-social-relations
#17
Norma Daykin, Nick de Viggiani, Yvonne Moriarty, Paul Pilkington
Young people in the criminal justice system experience significant health and wellbeing issues that often stem from poverty and disadvantage and, in turn, are linked with offending and reoffending behaviour. There is ongoing interest in interventions such as participatory music programmes that seek to foster social reintegration, support mental wellbeing and equip young offenders with life skills, competencies and emotional resilience. However, there is a need for a situated understanding of both positive and negative experiences that shape potential outcomes of music projects...
March 23, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326556/digital-atmospheres-affective-practices-of-care-in-elefriends
#18
Ian M Tucker, Lewis Goodings
This article develops the concept of digital atmosphere to analyse the affective power of social media to shape practices of care and support for people living with mental distress. Using contemporary accounts of affective atmospheres, the article focuses on feelings of distress, support and care that unfold through digital atmospheres. The power of social media intersects with people's support and care-seeking practices in multiple ways and not in a straightforward model of 'accessing or providing support'...
March 22, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326555/ultrasound-as-a-technology-of-reassurance-how-pregnant-women-and-health-care-professionals-articulate-ultrasound-reassurance-and-its-limitations
#19
Gareth M Thomas, Julie Roberts, Frances E Griffiths
The premise that ultrasound technologies provide reassurance for pregnant women is well-rehearsed. However, there has been little research about how this reassurance is articulated and understood by both expectant mothers and health care professionals. In this article, we draw on two qualitative UK studies to explore the salience of ultrasound reassurance to women's pregnancy experiences whilst highlighting issues around articulation and silence. Specifically, we capture how expectant parents express a general need for reassurance and how visualisation and the conduct of professionals have a crucial role to play in accomplishing a sense of reassurance...
March 22, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28276069/two-regimes-of-hiv-aids-the-mmwr-and-the-socio-political-construction-of-hiv-aids-as-a-black-disease
#20
Kevin M Moseby
Over the course of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, black Americans have become a central target of US public health prevention efforts. And today, HIV/AIDS is understood to disproportionally affect black Americans. This markedly contrasts with knowledge about the disease and efforts to prevent it in the first decade of the epidemic in the US, when expert and lay understandings and responses centred on white gay males. This article demonstrates that explaining these historical reversals as purely reflective of epidemiological data - or best knowledge available - is insufficient...
March 9, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
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