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Sociology of Health & Illness

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27910120/at-the-margins-of-biomedicine-the-ambiguous-position-of-registered-medical-practitioners-in-rural-indian-healthcare
#1
Papreen Nahar, Nanda Kishore Kannuri, Sitamma Mikkilineni, G V S Murthy, Peter Phillimore
This analysis challenges a tendency in public health and the social sciences to associate India's medical pluralism with a distinction between biomedicine, as a homogeneous entity, and its non-biomedical 'others'. We argue that this overdrawn dichotomy obscures the important part played by 'informal' biomedical practice, an issue with salience well beyond India. Based on a qualitative study in rural Andhra Pradesh, South India, we focus on a figure little discussed in the academic literature - the Registered Medical Practitioner (RMP) - who occupies a niche in the medical market-place as an informal exponent of biomedical treatment...
December 2, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27910108/a-day-in-the-life-of-a-m%C3%A3-ni%C3%A3-re-s-patient-understanding-the-lived-experiences-and-mental-health-impacts-of-m%C3%A3-ni%C3%A3-re-s-disease
#2
Sarah L Bell, Jessica Tyrrell, Cassandra Phoenix
Concepts of social practice are increasingly being used to understand experiences of everyday life, particularly in relation to consumption and healthy lifestyles. This article builds on this in the context of lives disrupted and reshaped by chronic illness. It uses social practice theory to examine the lived experiences of individuals with Ménière's disease; a long-term progressive vestibular disorder, defined by episodes of severe and debilitating vertigo, aural fullness, tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss...
December 2, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27910107/gestating-times-women-s-accounts-of-the-temporalities-of-pregnancies-that-end-in-abortion-in-england
#3
Siân M Beynon-Jones
Tensions between the 'clock time' of medicine and the embodied times of its subjects are central to feminist writing concerning Western obstetric practice. In this article, I expand the focus of this literature by addressing the temporal dynamics of another site of reproductive healthcare: abortion provision. Echoing obstetric accounts of birth, time in legal, healthcare and social scientific discourse on abortion is routinely conceptualised as a finite resource contained within the pregnant/foetal body, which can be measured using clocks and calendars...
December 2, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27891628/power-empowerment-and-person-centred-care-using-ethnography-to-examine-the-everyday-practice-of-unregistered-dementia-care-staff
#4
Kezia Scales, Simon Bailey, Joanne Middleton, Justine Schneider
The social positioning and treatment of persons with dementia reflects dominant biomedical discourses of progressive and inevitable loss of insight, capacity, and personality. Proponents of person-centred care, by contrast, suggest that such loss can be mitigated within environments that preserve rather than undermine personhood. In formal organisational settings, person-centred approaches place particular responsibility on 'empowered' direct-care staff to translate these principles into practice. These staff provide the majority of hands-on care, but with limited training, recognition, or remuneration...
November 28, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27891627/narrative-collisions-sociocultural-pressures-and-dementia-the-relational-basis-of-personhood-reconsidered
#5
Edward Tolhurst, Bernhard Weicht, Paul Kingston
The concept of personhood developed by Tom Kitwood highlights that the experience of dementia has relational dimensions that transcend the neurodegenerative impacts of the condition. This relational focus, however, has been narrowly conceptualised, with the impact of broader sociocultural factors on experience underplayed. The empirical exploration of interaction also requires reinforcement: a tendency for dyadic studies to portray findings in an individualised format hinders the interrogation of interpersonal negotiations...
November 27, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27882568/the-evolution-of-weak-standards-the-case-of-the-swedish-rheumatology-quality-registry
#6
Anna Essén, Michael Sauder
Research in sociology suggests that the effects of standards are not nearly as straightforward or as homogenising as they first appear. The present study extends these insights by demonstrating how even standards designed simply to collect data can produce extensive and unanticipated effects in medical fields as their uses evolve across actors and contexts. We draw on an embedded case study exploring the multifaceted consequences of the use of a practice-driven voluntary documentation standard: the Swedish rheumatology quality registry from 1995-2014...
November 23, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27868201/assembling-activity-setting-participation-with-disabled-young-people
#7
Barbara E Gibson, Gillian King, Gail Teachman, Bhavnita Mistry, Yani Hamdani
Rehabilitation research investigating activity participation has been largely conducted in a realist tradition that under-theorises the relationship between persons, technologies, and socio-material places. In this Canadian study we used a post-critical approach to explore activity/setting participation with 19 young people aged 14 to 23 years with complex communication and/or mobility impairments. Methods included integrated photo-elicitation, interviews, and participant observations of community-based activities...
November 21, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27862018/what-is-wrong-with-being-a-pill-taker-the-special-case-of-statins
#8
Louisa Polak
In an interview study of decision-making about statins, many participants said they took pills regularly, yet described themselves as 'not really pill-takers'. This paper explores this paradox and its implications. The practice of pill-taking itself can constitute a challenge to the presentation of moral adequacy, beyond the potential for rendering stigmatised illnesses visible. Meeting this challenge involves a complex process of calibrating often-conflicting moral imperatives: to be concerned, but not too concerned, over one's health; to be informed, but not over-informed; and deferential but not over-deferential to medical expertise...
November 16, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27859354/public-challenge-and-endorsement-of-sex-category-ambiguity-in-online-debate-the-sooner-people-stop-thinking-that-gender-is-a-matter-of-choice-the-better
#9
Helen Sweeting, Matthew William Maycock, Laura Walker, Kate Hunt
Despite academic feminist debate over several decades, the binary nature of sex as a (perhaps the) primary social classification is often taken for granted, as is the assumption that individuals can be unproblematically assigned a biological sex at birth. This article presents analysis of online debate on the BBC news website in November 2013, comprising 864 readers' responses to an article entitled 'Germany allows 'indeterminate' gender at birth'. It explores how discourse reflecting Western essentialist beliefs about people having one sex or 'the other' is maintained in debates conducted in this online public space...
November 16, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27862007/disentangling-patient-and-public-involvement-in-healthcare-decisions-why-the-difference-matters
#10
Mio Fredriksson, Jonathan Q Tritter
Patient and public involvement has become an integral aspect of many developed health systems and is judged to be an essential driver for reform. However, little attention has been paid to the distinctions between patients and the public, and the views of patients are often seen to encompass those of the general public. Using an ideal-type approach, we analyse crucial distinctions between patient involvement and public involvement using examples from Sweden and England. We highlight that patients have sectional interests as health service users in contrast to citizens who engage as a public policy agent reflecting societal interests...
November 11, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27813115/the-articulation-of-neoliberalism-narratives-of-experience-of-chronic-illness-management-in-bulgaria-and-the-uk
#11
Ivaylo Vassilev, Anne Rogers, Elka Todorova, Anne Kennedy, Poli Roukova
The shift from social democratic to a neoliberal consensus in modern welfare capitalist states is characterised by an emphasis on individual responsibility, consumer choice, market rationality and growing social inequalities. There has been little exploration of how neoliberalism has shaped the environment within which chronic illness is experienced and managed. This article explores the different articulations of neoliberalism manifest in the arena of personal illness management in Bulgaria and the UK. People with type 2 diabetes discussed their experiences in terms of struggling with diet, diabetes as a personal failure, integrating illness management and valued activities, and the trustworthiness of the healthcare system...
November 4, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27813121/family-social-capital-and-health-a-systematic-review-and-redirection
#12
Elena Carrillo Alvarez, Ichiro Kawachi, Jordi Riera Romani
The level (or scale) at which social capital can be conceptualised and measured ranges potentially from the macro-level (regional or country level), to the meso-level (neighbourhoods, workplaces, schools), down to the individual level. However, one glaring gap in the conceptualisation of social capital within the empirical literature has been the level of the family. Our aim in this review is to examine the family as the 'missing level' in studies on social capital and health. To do so, we conducted a systematic review on the use and measurement of this notion in the health literature, with the final intention of articulating a direction for future research in the field...
November 3, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27791267/a-narrative-analysis-of-the-birth-stories-of-early-age-mothers
#13
Anna Carson, Cathy Chabot, Devon Greyson, Kate Shannon, Putu Duff, Jean Shoveller
The telling of birth stories (i.e. stories that describe women's experiences of giving birth) is a common and important social practice. Whereas most research on birth narratives reflects the stories of middle-class, 'adult' women, we examine how the birth stories told by early-age mothers interconnect with broader narratives regarding social stigma and childbearing at 'too early' an age. Drawing on narrative theory, we analyse in-depth interviews with 81 mothers (ages 15-24 years) conducted in Greater Vancouver and Prince George, Canada, in 2014-15...
October 28, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27782311/ageing-masculinity-and-parkinson-s-disease-embodied-perspectives
#14
Grant Gibson, Ciara Kierans
Parkinson's disease (PD) presents as an illness which predominantly affects older men. However older men's lived experiences of PD, including how they are influenced by age and gender relations has seen little empirical study. Drawing on Watson's male body schema, this paper explores how men engage with masculinities and ageing in order to make sense and meaning from PD. Data is presented from 30 narrative and semi structured interviews with 15 men of various ages who were living with PD. Findings suggest that PD threatens a visceral embodiment located in the body's basic movements and intimate functions; a pragmatic embodiment expressed through men's everyday occupations and an experiential embodiment concerned with emotions and sensations felt within and through the body...
October 26, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27782304/nanomedicine-and-personalised-medicine-understanding-the-personalisation-of-health-care-in-the-molecular-era
#15
Mathieu Noury, José López
Globally supported by public policy and investment, nanomedicine is presented as an ongoing medical revolution that will radically change the practice of health care from diagnostic to therapeutic, and everything in between. One of nanomedicine's major promises is that of personalised medicine, enabling diagnostics and therapeutics tailored to individual needs and developing a truly 'patient-friendly' medical approach. Based on qualitative interviews with nanomedicine researchers in Canada, this article explores the emerging concept of personalised medicine as it becomes entangled with nanomedical research...
October 26, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27770450/enabling-and-controlling-parenthood-in-publicly-provided-maternity-healthcare-becoming-a-parent-in-finland
#16
Riikka Homanen
This article discusses practices of parental support in the maternity healthcare provided by the welfare state. Drawing on ethnographic material from clinics in Finland, I discuss maternity healthcare practices and processes as the specific contexts of subjectification to parenthood in the Nordic welfare state. The analysis shows that in both nurses' (work) experience-based knowledge and population-statistical knowledge, parental competence is achieved largely through the 'natural' process of experiencing pregnant life...
October 22, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27770440/to-what-extent-does-diagnosis-matter-dementia-diagnosis-trouble-interpretation-and-caregiving-network-dynamics
#17
Baptiste Brossard, Normand Carpentier
Contemporary research into health and mental health treats diagnosis as a central step in understanding illness management and trajectory; consequently, in the last two decades, sociology of diagnosis has attained increasing influence within medical sociology. Deeply embedded in social constructionism, the set of research divides between those who focus on the social and historical construction of diagnoses as categories, and those who see diagnosis as a process. Regarding the latter, this approach explores the constitution of the medical production, highlighting how it constitutes a starting point for entering a 'sick role', for being labelled, for naming one's problem and by extension, for framing one's illness narrative...
October 22, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27770437/death-in-the-clinic-women-s-perceptions-and-experiences-of-discarding-supernumerary-ivf-embryos
#18
Sheryl de Lacey
Perspectives on the status of human embryos and whether they should be discarded differ globally. Some countries protect embryos in law while in other countries embryos 'die' or 'succumb' in assisted reproductive technology clinics on a daily basis. This study analyses interview data drawn from a larger qualitative study conducted in South Australia from 2004-2007. 21 women and 12 of 21 partners were interviewed about the decision they made to discard their embryos. The analysis reported here sought to examine the ways in which women constructed and experienced the decision to discard embryos...
October 22, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27761912/how-adults-with-a-profound-intellectual-disability-engage-others-in-interaction
#19
Charles Antaki, Rebecca J Crompton, Chris Walton, W M L Finlay
Using video records of everyday life in a residential home, we report on what interactional practices are used by people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities to initiate encounters. There were very few initiations, and all presented difficulties to the interlocutor (support staff; the recording researcher); one (which we call 'blank recipiency') gave the interlocutor virtually no information at all on which to base a response. Only when the initiation was of a new phase in an interaction already under way (for example, the initiation of an alternative trajectory of a proposed physical move) was it likely to be successfully sustained...
October 20, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27726159/nurses-and-electronic-health-records-in-a-canadian-hospital-examining-the-social-organisation-and-programmed-use-of-digitised-nursing-knowledge
#20
Marie L Campbell, Janet M Rankin
Institutional ethnography (IE) is used to examine transformations in a professional nurse's work associated with her engagement with a hospital's electronic health record (EHR) which is being updated to integrate professional caregiving and produce more efficient and effective health care. We review in the technical and scholarly literature the practices and promises of information technology and, especially of its applications in health care, finding useful the more critical and analytic perspectives. Among the latter, scholarship on the activities of economising is important to our inquiry into the actual activities that transform 'things' (in our case, nursing knowledge and action) into calculable information for objective and financially relevant decision-making...
October 10, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
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