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Sociology of Health & Illness

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28815633/the-gas-that-fuels-the-engine-individuals-motivations-for-medicalisation
#1
Ann V Bell
It is well established that the drivers of medicalisation have shifted alongside changes in the institution of medicine. The process of medicalisation is no longer incited by macro processes of institutional prestige or control; rather, individual patients/consumers are pushing the process forward. The present study complicates this neat transition and examines the relationship between structure and agency using the case of assisted reproductive technology (ART), specifically the medicalisation of lesbian reproduction in the US...
August 16, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28771765/dynamics-between-doctors-and-managers-in-the-italian-national-health-care-system
#2
Giovanna M Vicarelli, Emmanuele Pavolini
This article focuses on the changes in the Italian NHS by concentrating on patterns in the managerialisation of doctors. It addresses a series of shortcomings in studies on the response by doctors to managerialisation. The first is a shortcoming of theoretical and analytical nature. It is necessary to adopt a broader perspective whereby analysis considers not only the interaction between doctors and managers, but also the public control and regulation agencies that operate in that field. The second shortcoming is a methodological one...
August 3, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28734026/falling-into-a-routine-from-habits-to-situated-practices
#3
Simon Cohn, Rebecca Lynch
In line with the concept of 'nudging' people to change their behaviour, there has been increased attention on habit as a focus for psychologically-based health interventions. It is hoped that behaviours initiated by interventions not only become so regular that they are normalised into people's everyday lives, but that through repetition they may eventually become fixed and habitual. In this paper we draw on people's accounts of participating in a trial designed to encourage greater physical activity, and attend to the ways they describe their engagement with interventions within wider narratives of their everyday lives...
July 21, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28718520/putting-public-health-infrastructures-to-the-test-introducing-hpv-vaccination-in-austria-and-the-netherlands
#4
Katharina T Paul, Iris Wallenburg, Roland Bal
This article presents two cases of policymaking concerning the vaccine against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), which is sexually transmitted and carcinogenic. Our analysis focuses on its introduction in Austria and the Netherlands. In both contexts, we find prevention and screening to be at once complementary and competing public health logics and we draw on the concept of 'infrastructure' to understand their roles in shaping the reception of the vaccine. We reveal how the HPV vaccine had to be made 'good enough', much like the Pap smear (Casper and Clarke ), by means of diverse tinkering practices that transformed both the technology and the infrastructures in which they emerged...
July 17, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28707782/exchanging-implements-the-micro-materialities-of-multidisciplinary-work-in-the-operating-theatre
#5
Christian Heath, Paul Luff, Marcus Sanchez-Svensson, Maxim Nicholls
Surgical procedures rely upon an array of commonplace tools, implements and materials that mediate practice and disciplinary collaboration within the operating theatre. Substantial time is dedicated to the issue and provision of these artefacts and their timely exchange is critical to the successful accomplishment of surgical procedures. In this article, we consider the practice, knowledge and agency that informs how particular implements and materials are passed by the scrub nurse to the surgeon that in turn enables their deployment with regard to the particular procedure and the contingencies 'at hand'...
July 14, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28681921/now-or-never-smoking-cessation-discussions-in-the-face-of-serious-illness
#6
Clara Iversen
Sociological research on medical discussions of lifestyle suggests that smoking patients may be seen as knowingly causing their medical problems. Therefore, it may be interactionally problematic for doctors to raise the issue of smoking cessation in relation to patients' serious health problems. While a serious illness can be expected to bring to the fore the relevance of smoking cessation advice, it may also give rise to questions about patients' right to treatment. This study uses conversation analysis to explicate how patients and doctors manage issues of responsibility in smoking cessation discussions in the face of a serious medical problem that strongly correlates with smoking...
July 6, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28643845/on-the-advancement-of-therapeutic-penality-therapeutic-authority-personality-science-and-the-therapeutic-community
#7
Ruari-Santiago McBride
In this article I examine the advancement of therapeutic penality in the UK, a penal philosophy that reimagines prison policy, practices and environments utilising psychological knowledge. Adopting a historical approach, I show how modern therapeutic penality is linked to the emergence of personality science in the nineteenth century and the development of the democratic therapeutic community (DTC) model in the twentieth century. I outline how at the turn of the twenty-first century a catalytic event generated a moral panic that led the British government to mobilise psychological knowledge and technologies in an attempt to manage dangerous people with severe personality disorder...
June 23, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28639371/a-movement-for-improvement-a-qualitative-study-of-the-adoption-of-social-movement-strategies-in-the-implementation-of-a-quality-improvement-campaign
#8
Justin Waring, Amanda Crompton
Given the difficulties of implementing 'top-down' quality improvements, health service leaders have turned to methods that empower clinicians to co-produce 'bottom-up' improvements. This has involved the adoption of strategies and activities associated with social movements, with clinicians encouraged to participate in collective action towards the shared goal of improvement. This paper examines the adoption of social movement methods by hospital managers as a strategy for implementing a quality improvement 'campaign'...
June 21, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28639296/pathways-to-professionalism-quality-improvement-care-pathways-and-the-interplay-of-standardisation-and-clinical-autonomy
#9
Graham P Martin, David Kocman, Timothy Stephens, Carol J Peden, Rupert M Pearse
Care pathways are a prominent feature of efforts to improve healthcare quality, outcomes and accountability, but sociological studies of pathways often find professional resistance to standardisation. This qualitative study examined the adoption and adaptation of a novel pathway as part of a randomised controlled trial in an unusually complex, non-linear field - emergency general surgery - by teams of surgeons and physicians in six theoretically sampled sites in the UK. We find near-universal receptivity to the concept of a pathway as a means of improving peri-operative processes and outcomes, but concern about the impact on appropriate professional judgement...
June 21, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28600800/women-weight-poverty-and-menopause-understanding-health-practices-in-a-context-of-chronic-disease-prevention
#10
Mélisa Audet, Alex Dumas, Rachelle Binette, Isabelle J Dionne
Socioeconomic inequalities in health persist despite major investments in illness prevention campaigns and universal healthcare systems. In this context, the increased risks of chronic diseases of specific sub-groups of vulnerable populations should be further investigated. The objective of this qualitative study is to examine the interaction between socioeconomic status (SES) and body weight in order to understand underprivileged women's increased vulnerability to chronic diseases after menopause. By drawing specifically on Pierre Bourdieu's sociocultural theory of practice, 20 semi-structured interviews were conducted from May to December of 2013 to investigate the health practices of clinically overweight, postmenopausal women living an underprivileged life in Canada...
June 10, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28597495/ageing-and-memory-medication-social-rationales-and-consumption-practices
#11
Noémia Lopes, Elsa Pegado, Joana R Zózimo
This article focuses on the social rationales underlying the consumption or rejection of medication for memory by the elderly. Our analysis is set within the wider frame of the current use of psychopharmaceuticals for the enhancement of everyday performance, discussing its relationship to new cultures of ageing. Our results, from a recently concluded study, point to different patterns of investment in memory in old age. On the one hand, we found a willingness to consume medication for memory - a heterogeneous disposition split between the imaginary of disease and that of performance enhancement...
June 9, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28594091/contingent-maternities-maternal-claims-making-in-third-party-reproduction
#12
Katherine M Johnson
The new reproductive technologies have significantly impacted definitions of motherhood. Historically, mothers were defined through the act of giving birth, but egg donation, embryo donation, and surrogacy disrupt this. Now multiple women can potentially claim maternity through gestational, genetic, legal, and social ties. Although there is some legal precedent for designating parentage, there is no simple solution to identify the 'true' mother. I address maternal claims-making in third party reproduction via a content analysis of US patient literature for infertile women...
June 8, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28593657/the-silencing-effects-of-the-childhood-innocence-ideal-the-perceptions-and-practices-of-fathers-in-educating-their-children-about-sexuality
#13
Clare Bennett, Jane Harden, Sally Anstey
This study employed Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis to explore eight fathers' perceptions and practices in talking to their ten year old children about puberty, relationships and reproduction. The fathers participated in face to face interviews which were analysed idiographically initially, followed by analysis at the group level. Interpretations were then developed through critical application of a Foucauldian lens of governmentality and biopower. The results revealed a tension between the fathers' cognitions, accounts and behaviours...
June 7, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28555937/market-driven-production-of-biospecimens-and-the-role-of-nhs-hospital-led-biobanks
#14
Stephen Timmons, Paraskevas Vezyridis
Biobanks are vital for biospecimen production in research, despite the regulatory, recruitment and commercial difficulties they face. We conducted interviews with clinicians, researchers, volunteers who recruit biobank participants, regulators and NHS managers about the integration of a biobank into an NHS hospital. We show that medical waste collected for biomedical research acquires its socio-ethical and economic value from the level of integration (both technologically and organisationally) of the biobank into the NHS hospital...
May 27, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543619/the-company-you-keep-is-socialising-with-higher-status-people-bad-for-mental-health
#15
Min-Ah Lee, Ichiro Kawachi
Socialising with higher-status individuals can be hypothesised to exert opposing influences on the mental health of the ego. On the one hand, socialising with higher-status alters might enable individuals to access valuable resources. On the other hand, status-discrepant friendships could be detrimental to mental health by engendering feelings of unfairness. We sought to examine the impact of status-discrepant social relationships on depressive symptoms in the 2012 Korean General Social Survey (KGSS), a nationally representative sample...
May 24, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28543376/the-everyday-risk-work-of-dutch-child-healthcare-professionals-inferring-safe-and-good-parenting-through-trust-as-mediated-by-a-lens-of-gender-and-class
#16
Gerlieke Veltkamp, Patrick Brown
Amidst intensifying policy concerns with children's wellbeing and development, healthcare professionals are required not only to assess risk of abuse and neglect, but to manage risk of 'poor parenting' more broadly. Drawing on 15 in-depth interviews and non-participant observations of 61 professional-family interactions, across four preventative public health services for children in the Netherlands, we explored how professionals accomplished such risk work amid intractable uncertainties. Building inferences from brief encounters with families, professionals gauged the extent to which they trusted parents to care 'appropriately'...
May 24, 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28677873/editorial-the-politics-of-reproduction-and-parenting-cultures-procreation-pregnancy-childbirth-and-childrearing
#17
EDITORIAL
Joanna Latimer, Gareth M Thomas
'Controlling life was and is to be achieved in part by rationalizing and industrializing reproductive processes. Multiple heterogeneous and contradictory groups have had an interest in achieving such control - from elites seeking to control others to individuals, especially women, trying to get a grip on their own lives through controlling their reproduction; from eugenicists ultimately trying to control evolution to neo-Malthusians trying to control national and population size; from philanthropists and foundation executives trying to shape the future of science and human life in varied directions to reproductive scientists trying to do their research … The biomedicalization of life itself (human, plant, and animal) is the key overarching and usually taken for granted social process here' (Clarke : 273-5)...
July 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28164318/-doing-good-by-proxy-human-animal-kinship-and-the-donation-of-canine-blood
#18
Vanessa Ashall, Pru Hobson-West
This article demonstrates the relevance of animals to medical sociology by arguing that pet owners' accounts of veterinary decision-making can highlight key sociological themes which are important to both human and animal health. Based on semi-structured interviews, the article argues that interspecies 'kinship' allows for the extension of sociological claims regarding altruism, self-interest and mutuality from human blood donation to companion animal blood 'donation'. Furthermore, this study extends sociological understanding of the human-animal bond by showing how the dog's status as kin meant they were expected to donate blood, and that the act of donation itself represents an important opportunity for family 'display'...
July 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27910107/gestating-times-women-s-accounts-of-the-temporalities-of-pregnancies-that-end-in-abortion-in-england
#19
Siân M Beynon-Jones
Tensions between the 'clock time' of medicine and the embodied times of its subjects are central to feminist writing concerning Western obstetric practice. In this article, I expand the focus of this literature by addressing the temporal dynamics of another site of reproductive healthcare: abortion provision. Echoing obstetric accounts of birth, time in legal, healthcare and social scientific discourse on abortion is routinely conceptualised as a finite resource contained within the pregnant/foetal body, which can be measured using clocks and calendars...
July 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27791267/a-narrative-analysis-of-the-birth-stories-of-early-age-mothers
#20
Anna Carson, Cathy Chabot, Devon Greyson, Kate Shannon, Putu Duff, Jean Shoveller
The telling of birth stories (i.e. stories that describe women's experiences of giving birth) is a common and important social practice. Whereas most research on birth narratives reflects the stories of middle-class, 'adult' women, we examine how the birth stories told by early-age mothers interconnect with broader narratives regarding social stigma and childbearing at 'too early' an age. Drawing on narrative theory, we analyse in-depth interviews with 81 mothers (ages 15-24 years) conducted in Greater Vancouver and Prince George, Canada, in 2014-15...
July 2017: Sociology of Health & Illness
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