journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Seminars in Neurology

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511263/diagnosis-and-treatment-of-functional-psychogenic-parkinsonism
#1
Kathrin LaFaver, Alberto J Espay
Functional (psychogenic) parkinsonism (FP) is recognized by the mandatory combination of marked slowness without progressive decrement on repetitive manual tasks and variable resistance against passive movements in the absence of cogwheel rigidity. Other functional phenotypes, such as functional tremor and functional gait impairment, may coexist. Although neither necessary nor sufficient for the diagnosis of FP, supportive historical clues include the sudden onset of symptoms and absent or nonphysiologic response to levodopa...
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511262/recognizing-atypical-parkinsonisms-red-flags-and-therapeutic-approaches
#2
Nikolaus R McFarland, Christopher W Hess
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511261/current-practice-and-the-future-of-deep-brain-stimulation-therapy-in-parkinson-s-disease
#3
Leonardo Almeida, Wissam Deeb, Chauncey Spears, Enrico Opri, Rene Molina, Daniel Martinez-Ramirez, Aysegul Gunduz, Christopher W Hess, Michael S Okun
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective therapy for Parkinson's disease patients experiencing motor fluctuations, medication-resistant tremor, and/or dyskinesia. Currently, the subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus internus are the two most widely used targets, with individual advantages and disadvantages influencing patient selection. Potential DBS patients are selected using the few existing guidelines and the available DBS literature, and many centers employ an interdisciplinary team review of the individual's risk-benefit profile...
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511260/botulinum-toxin-therapy-for-parkinson-s-disease
#4
Aparna Wagle Shukla, Irene A Malaty
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511259/impulse-control-disorders-and-related-complications-of-parkinson-s-disease-therapy
#5
Alexander M Lopez, Daniel Weintraub, Daniel O Claassen
Impulsive and compulsive behaviors in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are most often attributed to dopamine agonist therapy; dysregulation of the mesocorticolimbic system accounts for this behavioral phenotype. The clinical presentation is commonly termed impulse control disorder (ICD): Behaviors include hypersexuality, compulsive eating, shopping, pathological gambling, and compulsive hobby participation. However, not all PD individuals taking dopamine agonists develop these behavioral changes. In this review, the authors focus on the similarities between the phenotypic presentation of ICDs with that of other reward-based behavioral disorders, including binge eating disorder, pathological gambling, and substance use disorders...
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511258/management-of-autonomic-dysfunction-in-parkinson-s-disease
#6
Ronald F Pfeiffer
Autonomic dysfunction is a frequent and important nonmotor feature of Parkinson's disease (PD). Autonomic dysfunction in PD spans a broad clinical spectrum. Cardiovascular dysfunction is characterized most prominently by orthostatic hypotension. Gastrointestinal dysfunction can involve virtually all levels of the gastrointestinal tract. Urinary dysfunction can entail either too frequent voiding or difficulty voiding. Sexual dysfunction is frequent and frustrating for both the patient and the partner. Alterations in sweating and body temperature are not widely recognized, but often are present...
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511257/characterizing-cognitive-impairment-in-parkinson-s-disease
#7
Meagan Bailey, Jennifer G Goldman
Cognitive impairment is a frequent complication in Parkinson's disease (PD), though it can be heterogeneous in its presentation and progression. Cognitive deficits vary among patients with regard to clinical features, severity, and progression to dementia. A growing recognition of cognitive impairment in PD in both the clinical and research settings has led to advances in diagnostic criteria and improved understanding of the clinical phenotypes, associated biomarkers, and underlying pathophysiology of both PD dementia and PD mild cognitive impairment...
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511256/nonmotor-symptoms-in-parkinson-s-disease
#8
Umer Akbar, Anelyssa D'Abreu, Joseph H Friedman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511255/motor-complications-of-dopaminergic-medications-in-parkinson-s-disease
#9
Maria Eliza Freitas, Christopher W Hess, Susan H Fox
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511254/genetic-forms-of-parkinson-s-disease
#10
Christine Y Kim, Roy N Alcalay
One of the greatest advances in Parkinson's disease (PD) research in the past two decades has been a better understanding of PD genetics. Of the many candidate genes investigated, the best studied include LRRK2, SNCA, VPS35, Parkin, PINK1, and DJ1. The authors review the key clinical features of these monogenic forms, as well as for the prevalent risk factor gene, GBA, including the phenotype, clinical course, and treatment response. They also outline areas for future investigation: longitudinal studies of PD's clinical course, the identification of its premotor manifestations, and its specific mechanisms of pathogenicity...
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511253/pathophysiology-and-management-of-parkinsonian-tremor
#11
Rick C Helmich, Michiel F Dirkx
Parkinson's tremor is one of the cardinal motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. The pathophysiology of Parkinson's tremor is different from that of other motor symptoms such as bradykinesia and rigidity. In this review, the authors discuss evidence suggesting that tremor is a network disorder that arises from distinct pathophysiological changes in the basal ganglia and in the cerebellothalamocortical circuit. They also discuss how interventions in this circuitry, for example, deep brain surgery and noninvasive brain stimulation, can modulate or even treat tremor...
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511252/diagnosis-and-management-of-parkinson-s-disease
#12
Arjun Tarakad, Joseph Jankovic
Despite numerous efforts to identify specific and sensitive biomarkers, the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) is still based on clinical criteria that include the presence of a combination of cardinal motor features (tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability), other motor features (including freezing of gait and abnormal postures), and numerous nonmotor features. In addition, the presence of atypical features may suggest an alternative diagnosis. Levodopa therapy remains the gold standard in the management of motor features of PD...
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511251/the-phenomenology-of-parkinson-s-disease
#13
Christopher W Hess, Mark Hallett
The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease are not limited to the cardinal symptoms of bradykinesia, rigidity, and resting tremor, but also include a variety of interrelated motor phenomena such as deficits in spatiotemporal planning and movement sequencing, scaling and timing of movements, and intermuscular coordination that can be clinically observed. Although many of these phenomena overlap, a review of the full breadth of the motor phenomenon can aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression...
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511250/update-on-parkinson-s-disease
#14
Christopher W Hess, Michael S Okun
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511249/christopher-w-hess-md-and-michael-s-okun-md
#15
David M Greer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511248/the-importance-of-facts-and-the-role-of-academic-publishers-in-today-s-world-a-publisher-s-view
#16
Daniel Schiff
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28147425/erratum-medical-and-surgical-advances-in-intracerebral-hemorrhage-and-intraventricular-hemorrhage
#17
Wendy Ziai, J Ricardo Carhuapoma, Paul Nyquist, Daniel F Hanley
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28147424/rehabilitation-after-cardiac-arrest-integration-of-neurologic-and-cardiac-rehabilitation
#18
Liesbeth W Boyce, Paulien H Goossens
Cognitive impairments are common after resuscitation. Severe cognitive impairments are easily recognized. Mild cognitive impairments are much more difficult to spot. Given the influence of cognitive problems in daily functioning, it is important to identify cognitive impairments at an early stage. Also, emotional problems, mainly depression and fear, are common in this group of patients. To optimize the care for patients after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, rehabilitation should focus on the physical approach through cardiac rehabilitation and on brain injury and associated cognitive impairments...
February 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28147423/follow-up-of-cardiac-arrest-survivors-why-how-and-when-a-practical-approach
#19
Gisela Lilja
Cardiac arrest (CA) survivors may experience cognitive, physical, or emotional problems that can affect their return to everyday activities and quality of life. To improve long-term outcomes, interventions after hospital discharge may be needed. A follow-up plan to identify CA survivors with increased risk of residual cognitive, physical, or emotional problems is important to target interventions and support. Current recommendations suggest that follow-up should include screening of potential problems, sharing information, and relevant referrals when needed...
February 2017: Seminars in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28147422/withdrawal-of-life-sustaining-therapy-after-cardiac-arrest
#20
Tobias Cronberg, Michael Kuiper
An increasing number of patients are successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest (CA) and subsequently treated in an intensive care unit due to unconsciousness. Approximately half of these patients will die during the first weeks postarrest, typically after a determination of a poor neurologic prognosis and a decision to withdraw life-sustaining therapy (WLST). These decisions are guided by universal ethical principles. Neurologic prognostication, WLST, and functional outcome after CA are closely correlated, but routines vary between and within countries...
February 2017: Seminars in Neurology
journal
journal
28257
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"