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American Journal of Primatology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29331042/the-effects-of-social-context-and-food-abundance-on-chimpanzee-feeding-competition
#1
Rebecca Koomen, Esther Herrmann
Feeding competition is thought to play a role in primate social organization as well as cognitive evolution. For chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), social and ecological factors can affect competition, yet how these factors interact to affect feeding behavior is not fully understood; they can be difficult to disentangle in wild settings. This experiment investigated the differential effects of food quantity, the presence of a co-feeding partner, and the contestability of a food patch on feeding rate. We presented tolerant pairs of chimpanzees from a semi-captive social group with an apparatus comprising a matrix of transparent tubes between two adjacent rooms, of which, either all (abundant condition) or only a small proportion (scarce condition) were baited with peanuts...
January 13, 2018: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29277935/american-journal-of-primatology-goals-and-priorities-of-a-new-editor
#2
EDITORIAL
Karen L Bales
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 26, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29266407/the-effect-of-extreme-weather-events-on-hair-cortisol-and-body-weight-in-a-wild-ring-tailed-lemur-population-lemur-catta-in-southwestern-madagascar
#3
Sara Fardi, Michelle L Sauther, Frank P Cuozzo, Ibrahim A Y Jacky, Robin M Bernstein
Madagascar is known for its hypervariable climate with periodic droughts and cyclones, but little is known of the impact of such events on lemur physiology. We examined the effects of sequential weather periods, drought, normal, cyclone and post-cyclone, on hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) and body weight in wild ring-tailed lemurs, Lemur catta (n = 185), at the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve in southwestern Madagascar. Data were modeled and analyzed by sex, age, and troop. Given the ecological consequences of extreme climatic perturbations, we hypothesized that drought and cyclone would significantly impact lemur HCC...
December 20, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29266298/the-influence-of-age-on-wild-rhesus-macaques-affiliative-social-interactions
#4
Zhijie Liao, Sebastian Sosa, Chengfeng Wu, Peng Zhang
The social relationships that individuals experience at different life stages have a non-negligible influence on their lives, and this is particularly true for group living animals. The long lifespan of many primates makes it likely that these animals have various tactics of social interaction to adapt to complex changes in environmental or physical conditions. The different strategies used in social interaction by individuals at different life stages, and whether the position (central or peripheral) or role (initiator or recipient) of an individual in the group social network changes with age, are intriguing questions that remain to be investigated...
December 20, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29206291/cranial-shape-variation-in-adult-howler-monkeys-alouatta-seniculus
#5
Luca Fiorenza, Emiliano Bruner
Howler monkeys (genus Alouatta) display a distinctive cranial architecture characterized by airorhynchy (or retroflexion of the facial skeleton on the cranial base), a small braincase, and a posteriorly oriented foramen magnum. This configuration has been associated with distinct factors including a high folivory diet, locomotion, and the presence of a specialized vocal tract characterized by large hyoid bone. However, the morphological relationships between the facial and neurocranial blocks in Alouatta have been scarcely investigated...
December 5, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29194704/social-play-among-juvenile-wild-japanese-macaques-macaca-fuscata-strengthens-their-social-bonds
#6
Masaki Shimada, Cédric Sueur
Social play and grooming are typical affiliative interactions for many primate species, and are thought to have similar biological functions. However, grooming increases with age, whereas social play decreases. We proposed the hypothesis that both social grooming and social play in juveniles strengthen their social bonds in daily activities. We carried out field research on the social relationships among juvenile wild Japanese macaques in a troop in Kinkazan, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, from fall 2007 to spring 2008 to investigate this hypothesis...
November 30, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29168188/the-relationship-between-social-play-and-developmental-milestones-in-wild-chimpanzees-pan-troglodytes-schweinfurthii
#7
Matthew R Heintz, Carson M Murray, A Catherine Markham, Anne E Pusey, Elizabeth V Lonsdorf
Social play is common among many group-living animals, but the benefits are not well understood. Proposed benefits include increased muscle coordination as the result of increased locomotor versatility and development, and strengthened social bonds through interactions with like-aged individuals. In this study, we used 33 years of long-term behavioral data on infant chimpanzees in Gombe National Park, Tanzania, to examine these potential benefits of social play, specifically how the percentage of time engaged in social play relates to motor and social developmental milestones...
November 23, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29140563/-stink-flirting-in-ring-tailed-lemurs-lemur-catta-male-olfactory-displays-to-females-as-honest-costly-signals
#8
Amber D Walker-Bolton, Joyce A Parga
Sexual selection for honest behavioral displays of quality has driven the development of remarkably complex courtship behavior in many animal species. Olfactory displays are often overlooked as an area of inquiry compared to auditory and visual displays. Ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) scent marking of substrates has been studied extensively, although the male olfactory displays of anointing and wafting tails to females has received relatively little attention. We studied the role of male olfactory displays to females, evaluating whether such signals function as honest, costly signals of male dominance status in two groups of wild L...
November 15, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29140552/the-influence-of-phylogeny-social-style-and-sociodemographic-factors-on-macaque-social-network-structure
#9
Krishna N Balasubramaniam, Brianne A Beisner, Carol M Berman, Arianna De Marco, Julie Duboscq, Sabina Koirala, Bonaventura Majolo, Andrew J MacIntosh, Richard McFarland, Sandra Molesti, Hideshi Ogawa, Odile Petit, Gabriele Schino, Sebastian Sosa, Cédric Sueur, Bernard Thierry, Frans B M de Waal, Brenda McCowan
Among nonhuman primates, the evolutionary underpinnings of variation in social structure remain debated, with both ancestral relationships and adaptation to current conditions hypothesized to play determining roles. Here we assess whether interspecific variation in higher-order aspects of female macaque (genus: Macaca) dominance and grooming social structure show phylogenetic signals, that is, greater similarity among more closely-related species. We use a social network approach to describe higher-order characteristics of social structure, based on both direct interactions and secondary pathways that connect group members...
November 15, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29140543/infant-mortality-in-white-faced-capuchins-the-impact-of-alpha-male-replacements
#10
Lauren F Brasington, Eva C Wikberg, Shoji Kawamura, Linda M Fedigan, Katharine M Jack
Infanticide is common in the context of alpha male replacements (AMR), particularly in groups where alpha males experience high reproductive skew and the infants are unlikely to be related to a new alpha male. We examined the relationship between the rate of infant mortality, infant age, and the occurrence and type of AMR in white-faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus imitator) of the Santa Rosa population in Sector Santa Rosa, Área de Conservación Guanacaste. Specifically, we investigated how the source of the new alpha male (coresident or extragroup) and relative aggression level during AMRs influenced infant mortality in this species...
November 15, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29130511/a-decade-as-executive-editor-of-the-american-journal-of-primatology
#11
EDITORIAL
Paul A Garber
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 11, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29095520/the-grand-challenge-of-great-ape-health-and-conservation-in-the-anthropocene
#12
Dominic A Travis, Elizabeth V Lonsorf, Thomas R Gillespie
"Ecosystem Health recognizes the inherent interdependence of the health of humans, animals and ecosystems and explores the perspectives, theories and methodologies emerging at the interface between ecological and health sciences." This broad focus requires new approaches and methods for solving problems of greater complexity at larger scales than ever before. Nowhere is this point more salient than the case of disease emergence and control at the human-non human primate interface in shrinking tropical forests under great anthropogenic pressure...
November 2, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29095514/genetic-analysis-of-samples-from-wild-populations-opens-new-perspectives-on-hybridization-between-long-tailed-macaca-fascicularis-and-rhesus-macaques-macaca-mulatta
#13
Srichan Bunlungsup, Sree Kanthaswamy, Robert F Oldt, David Glenn Smith, Paul Houghton, Yuzuru Hamada, Suchinda Malaivijitnond
In the past decade, many researchers have published papers about hybridization between long-tailed and rhesus macaques. These previous works have proposed unidirectional gene flow with the Isthmus of Kra as the zoogeographical barrier of hybridization. However, these reports analyzed specimens of unknown origin and/or did not include specimens from Thailand, the center of the proposed area of hybridization. Collected specimens of long-tailed and rhesus macaques representing all suspected hybridization areas were examined...
November 2, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29095513/the-evolution-of-cranial-base-and-face-in-cercopithecoidea-and-hominoidea-modularity-and-morphological-integration
#14
Antonio Profico, Paolo Piras, Costantino Buzi, Fabio Di Vincenzo, Flavio Lattarini, Marina Melchionna, Alessio Veneziano, Pasquale Raia, Giorgio Manzi
The evolutionary relationship between the base and face of the cranium is a major topic of interest in primatology. Such areas of the skull possibly respond to different selective pressures. Yet, they are often said to be tightly integrated. In this paper, we analyzed shape variability in the cranial base and the facial complex in Cercopithecoidea and Hominoidea. We used a landmark-based approach to single out the effects of size (evolutionary allometry), morphological integration, modularity, and phylogeny (under Brownian motion) on skull shape variability...
November 2, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29095512/through-the-eyes-of-children-drawings-as-an-evaluation-tool-for-children-s-understanding-about-endangered-mexican-primates
#15
Montserrat Franquesa-Soler, Juan Carlos Serio-Silva
This study seeks to understand children's perceptions and knowledge of endangered Mexican primates. The black howler monkey (Alouatta pigra) is a charismatic species endemic to Southern Mexico, Northern Belize, and Guatemala and is a symbol of the region that fosters a sense of local pride. Therefore, it can be considered a flagship species for the forests of Southern Mexico. We evaluated the perception and knowledge that 297 Mexican elementary school children (8-10 years old) have about black howler monkeys...
November 2, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29095510/genetic-assessment-for-the-endangered-black-lion-tamarin-leontopithecus-chrysopygus-mikan-1823-callitrichidae-primates
#16
Paola A Ayala-Burbano, Lucas Caldano, Pedro Manoel Galetti Junior, Alcides Pissinatti, Mara Cristina Marques, Dominic Wormell, Patrícia Domingues de Freitas
This is the first study analyzing genetic diversity in captive individuals of the endangered black lion tamarin, Leontopithecus chrysopygus, and also comparing genetic diversity parameters between wild populations and captive groups using the same set of molecular markers. We evaluated genetic diversity and differentiation for the Brazilian and European captive groups and a wild population through 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers. The genetic diversity levels were similar among Brazilian captive, European captive and wild animals from the National Forest of Capão Bonito...
November 2, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29095507/social-hair-pulling-in-captive-rhesus-macaques-macaca-mulatta
#17
Allison Heagerty, Rebecca A Wales, Kamm Prongay, Daniel H Gottlieb, Kristine Coleman
Alopecia is common among captive populations of nonhuman primates. There are many potential causes of alopecia, including physiological conditions such as hormonal imbalance and infection, features of the captive environment such as housing type, ground substrate, and group density, as well as behavioral abnormalities such as self-plucking. A potential behavioral cause of alopecia in group-housed primates is social hair pulling, where one animal pulls hair from a conspecific. While social hair pulling has been conflated with overgrooming in some of the alopecia literature, other authors have categorized it as a form of aggression rather than a form of excessive grooming...
November 2, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29072335/spatial-distribution-of-buffy-tufted-ear-callithrix-aurita-and-invasive-marmosets-callithrix-spp-in-a-tropical-rainforest-reserve-in-southeastern-brazil
#18
Nathalia Detogne, Átilla C Ferreguetti, José Henrique F Mello, Marcelo C Santana, Aline da Conceição Dias, Natalia C J da Mota, Andressa Esteves da Cruz Gonçalves, Cristiane P de Souza, Helena G Bergallo
We investigated the spatial distribution of native and invasive marmoset species (Callithrix), as well as their hybrids, in the Serra dos Órgãos National Park (PARNASO) and surrounding area in Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil. To estimate occupancy and the detection probability, we surveyed 56 sites within the park and 52 sites outside its limits using vocal playbacks, as well as by interviewing local residents in the surrounding area. We estimated the occupancy and detection probability of Callithrix aurita and the observed groups composed of Callithrix jacchus, Callithrix penicillata, and their hybrids...
October 26, 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29048740/thyroid-hormone-fluctuations-indicate-a-thermoregulatory-function-in-both-a-tropical-alouatta-palliata-and-seasonally-cold-habitat-macaca-fuscata-primate
#19
Cynthia L Thompson, Brianna L Powell, Susan H Williams, Goro Hanya, Kenneth E Glander, Christopher J Vinyard
Thyroid hormones boost animals' basal metabolic rate and represent an important thermoregulatory pathway for mammals that face cold temperatures. Whereas the cold thermal pressures experienced by primates in seasonal habitats at high latitudes and elevations are often apparent, tropical habitats also display distinct wet and dry seasons with modest changes in thermal environment. We assessed seasonal and temperature-related changes in thyroid hormone levels for two primate species in disparate thermal environments, tropical mantled howlers (Alouatta palliata), and seasonally cold-habitat Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata)...
November 2017: American Journal of Primatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29035006/applying-systems-thinking-to-inform-studies-of-wildlife-trade-in-primates
#20
Mary E Blair, Minh D Le, Hoàng M Thạch, Anna Panariello, Ngọc B Vũ, Mark G Birchette, Gautam Sethi, Eleanor J Sterling
Wildlife trade presents a major threat to primate populations, which are in demand from local to international scales for a variety of uses from food and traditional medicine to the exotic pet trade. We argue that an interdisciplinary framework to facilitate integration of socioeconomic, anthropological, and biological data across multiple spatial and temporal scales is essential to guide the study of wildlife trade dynamics and its impacts on primate populations. Here, we present a new way to design research on wildlife trade in primates using a systems thinking framework...
November 2017: American Journal of Primatology
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