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British Journal of Social Psychology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28815636/muslims-tolerance-towards-outgroups-longitudinal-evidence-for-the-role-of-respect
#1
Bernd Simon, Christoph Daniel Schaefer
We employed a longitudinal design to test two hypotheses concerning Muslims' respect for and tolerance towards disapproved outgroups. In support of the outgroup respect-tolerance hypothesis derived from the disapproval-respect model of social tolerance, our results strongly suggest that respect for disapproved outgroups is not just a correlate of tolerance towards those groups, but a causal antecedent. In support of the intergroup respect-reciprocity hypothesis, we identified respect from disapproved outgroups as an effective source of respect for disapproved outgroups and therefore also as a (distal) source of tolerance towards those groups...
August 15, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28779499/-i-didn-t-mean-that-it-was-just-a-slip-of-the-tongue-racial-slips-and-gaffes-in-the-public-arena
#2
Rose Burford-Rice, Martha Augoustinos
Speech errors, slips, and gaffes made in the public arena that are perceived to be either implicitly or explicitly racially offensive often result in significant social consequences to the responsible speaker and generate public controversy. The current research, informed by conversation analysis and discursive psychology, examines how speakers manage such troubles-in-speaking in public settings. The sample of naturalistic data includes five such instances and related apologies sourced from YouTube and news websites...
August 4, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28762554/meaning-and-death-thought-accessibility
#3
Daryl R Van Tongeren, Jeffrey D Green
Meaning is a central feature in human life, but death can disrupt a sense of meaning. Two experiments tested the hypothesis that meaning in life and meaning in death are distinct types of meaning when mortality is salient and differentially affect death-thought accessibility (DTA). In Experiment 1, imagining a specific scenario in which meaning is preserved beyond death reduced DTA relative to a standard mortality salience prime; moreover, these effects were not due to changes in self-esteem. In Experiment 2, imagining a meaningful life when mortality is salient elicited greater DTA, whereas imagining meaning in death elicited less DTA...
August 1, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28741679/comparing-social-group-identifications-and-socioeconomic-deprivation-as-predictors-of-psychological-distress-evidence-from-a-scottish-primary-care-sample
#4
Fabia Cientanni, Kevin Power, Fabio Sani, Christopher Wright, Frances Baty, Kerry Hustings, David Morgan, Gary Tanner
Social group identification and socioeconomic deprivation have both been linked to self-reported depressive symptoms in general population samples; however, no study to date has explored the strength of the joint predictive value of these factors within a mental health population. The current study explored the impact of social group identifications and socioeconomic deprivation, together with important clinical and demographic variables, on psychological distress in a Scottish mental health sample. Participants (N = 976) were recruited from referrals to a computerized cognitive behavioural therapy (cCBT) programme in Scotland, 'Beating the Blues' (BtB) over a 25-month period...
July 25, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28653413/normalizing-trust-participants-immediately-post-hoc-explanations-of-behaviour-in-milgram-s-obedience-experiments
#5
Matthew M Hollander, Jason Turowetz
We bring an ethnomethodological perspective on language and discourse to a data source crucial for explaining behaviour in social psychologist Stanley Milgram's classic 'obedience' experiments - yet one largely overlooked by the Milgram literature. In hundreds of interviews conducted immediately after each experiment, participants sought to justify their actions, often doing so by normalizing the situation as benign, albeit uncomfortable. Examining 91 archived recordings of these interviews from several experimental conditions, we find four recurrent accounts for continuation, each used more frequently by 'obedient' than 'defiant' participants...
June 26, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28653379/only-one-small-sin-how-self-construal-affects-self-control
#6
Janina Steinmetz, Thomas Mussweiler
Past research has shown that self-construal can influence self-control by reducing interdependent people's impulsivity in the presence of peers. We broaden these findings by examining the hypothesis that an interdependent (vs. independent) self-construal fosters self-control even in the absence of peers and for non-impulsive decisions. We further explore whether this effect could be mediated by the more interrelated (vs. isolated) processing style of interdependent (vs. independent) people. Such an interrelated (vs...
June 26, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28639419/examining-the-role-of-positive-and-negative-intergroup-contact-and-anti-immigrant-prejudice-in-brexit
#7
Rose Meleady, Charles R Seger, Marieke Vermue
This study examined the interplay of anti-immigrant prejudice and intergroup contact experience on voting intentions within Britain's 2016 referendum on its membership in the European Union. In the days before the referendum, we asked more than 400 British people how they planned to vote. We measured a number of demographic factors expected to predict voting intentions as well as individuals' prejudice towards and intergroup contact experience (positive and negative) with EU immigrants. Anti-immigrant prejudice was a strong correlate of support for Brexit...
June 21, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28623855/authentic-feminist-authenticity-and-feminist-identity-in-teenage-feminists-talk
#8
Octavia Calder-Dawe, Nicola Gavey
This article explores how young people's feminist identities take shape in conjunction with a contemporary ideal of personal authenticity: to know and to express the 'real me'. Drawing from interviews with 18 teenagers living in Auckland, New Zealand, we examine a novel convergence of authenticity and feminism in participants' identity talk. For social psychologists interested in identity and politics, this convergence is intriguing: individualizing values such as authenticity are generally associated with disengagement with structural critique and with a repudiation of politicized and activist identities...
June 17, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28612450/perception-of-emotional-climate-in-a-revolution-test-of-a-multistage-theory-of-revolution-in-the-tunisian-context
#9
Bernard Rimé, Vincent Yzerbyt, Abdelwahab Mahjoub
Participation in social movements and collective action depends upon people's capacity to perceive their societal context. We examined this question in the context of Arab Spring revolutions. In a classic theory of revolution highlighting the role of collective emotions, Brinton (1938) claimed that revolutions, far from chaos, proceed in an orderly sequence involving four stages: euphoria, degradation, terror, and restoration. The emotional climate (EC) as perceived by ordinary Tunisian citizens (2,699 women and 3,816 men) was measured during the 4 years of the Tunisian revolution...
June 13, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28547845/institutional-apologies-and-socio-emotional-climate-in-the-south-american-context
#10
Magdalena Bobowik, Darío Páez, Maitane Arnoso, Manuel Cárdenas, Bernard Rimé, Elena Zubieta, Marcela Muratori
This study examined perceptions of institutional apologies related to past political violence and socio-emotional climate among victims and non-victims in Argentina (n = 518), Chile (n = 1,278), and Paraguay (n = 1,172) based on quasi-representative samples. The perceptions of apology as sincere and efficient in improving intergroup relations were associated with a positive socio-emotional climate across the three nations. Victims evaluated apologies more positively and perceived a more positive socio-emotional climate compared to non-victims in Paraguay and Argentina, whereas the opposite was true in Chile where the government opposed the victims' leftist political orientation...
May 25, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28547824/the-promise-of-a-better-group-future-cognitive-alternatives-increase-students-self-efficacy-and-academic-performance
#11
Aarti Iyer, Airong Zhang, Jolanda Jetten, Zhen Hao, Lijuan Cui
Drawing on classic social identity theorizing (Tajfel, Differentiation between social groups: Studies in the social psychology of intergroup relations, London, UK, Academic Press, 1978), we propose that low-status minority group members' self-efficacy and performance on intellectual tasks can be enhanced by prompting them to believe in a better future for their group (i.e., increasing awareness of cognitive alternatives to the existing low-status position). Study 1 manipulated cognitive alternatives among 157 migrant workers' children in China, showing that self-efficacy was enhanced in the high compared to the low cognitive alternative condition...
May 25, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28547801/is-higher-inequality-less-legitimate-depends-on-how-you-frame-it
#12
Susanne Bruckmüller, Gerhard Reese, Sarah E Martiny
Economic inequality is increasing both globally and in various countries around the world, and such inequality has been linked to worsening health, well-being, and social cohesion. A key predictor for whether people take action against inequality is the extent to which they perceive it as illegitimate. We investigate how two variables jointly predict the legitimization of inequality, namely the perceived magnitude of differences in economic outcomes and the way these differences are described. Two experiments (total N = 190) tested whether framing the same difference in outcomes as an advantaged group having more or as a disadvantaged group having less moderates whether higher inequality is perceived as less legitimate...
May 25, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28581150/objectification-seeing-and-treating-people-as-things
#13
EDITORIAL
Steve Loughnan, Jeroen Vaes
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27878836/social-comparison-personal-relative-deprivation-and-materialism
#14
Hyunji Kim, Mitchell J Callan, Ana I Gheorghiu, William J Matthews
Across five studies, we found consistent evidence for the idea that personal relative deprivation (PRD), which refers to resentment stemming from the belief that one is deprived of deserved outcomes compared to others, uniquely contributes to materialism. In Study 1, self-reports of PRD positively predicted materialistic values over and above socioeconomic status, personal power, self-esteem, and emotional uncertainty. The experience of PRD starts with social comparison, and Studies 2 and 3 found that PRD mediated the positive relation between a tendency to make social comparisons of abilities and materialism...
June 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28474440/in-a-moral-dilemma-choose-the-one-you-love-impartial-actors-are-seen-as-less-moral-than-partial-ones
#15
Jamie S Hughes
Although impartiality and concern for the greater good are lauded by utilitarian philosophies, it was predicted that when values conflict, those who acted impartially rather than partially would be viewed as less moral. Across four studies, using life-or-death scenarios and more mundane ones, support for the idea that relationship obligations are important in moral attribution was found. In Studies 1-3, participants rated an impartial actor as less morally good and his or her action as less moral compared to a partial actor...
May 4, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28466538/judging-the-gender-of-the-inanimate-benevolent-sexism-and-gender-stereotypes-guide-impressions-of-physical-objects
#16
Benjamin R Meagher
Within a given culture, sexist ideologies and stereotypes are largely characterized by their prescriptive expectations for the types of social and behavioural domains men and women occupy. The activities that take place within these respective domains, however, frequently involve designed, physical artefacts. This study reports a pair of studies that test whether sexist schemas are capable of guiding not only impressions of men and women as social groups, but also their impressions of the inanimate objects associated with these groups...
May 2, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28436083/the-added-value-of-world-views-over-self-views-predicting-modest-behaviour-in-eastern-and-western-cultures
#17
Sylvia Xiaohua Chen, Jacky C K Ng, Emma E Buchtel, Yanjun Guan, Hong Deng, Michael Harris Bond
Personality research has been focused on different aspects of the self, including traits, attitudes, beliefs, goals, and motivation. These aspects of the self are used to explain and predict social behaviour. The present research assessed generalized beliefs about the world, termed 'social axioms' (Leung et al., ), and examined their additive power over beliefs about the self in explaining a communal behaviour, that is, modesty. Three studies predicted reported modest behaviour among Mainland Chinese, Hong Kong Chinese, East Asian Canadians, and European Canadians...
April 24, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419478/exposure-to-the-american-flag-polarizes-democratic-republican-ideologies
#18
Eugene Y Chan
Some prior research has suggested that exposure to the American flag tilts Americans towards Republicanism, while others have proffered that it brings outs a common 'together' perspective instead. We explore a third possibility - that it may actually polarize Americans' political ideology. It is generally accepted that exposure to an environmental cue can shift attitudes and behaviours, at least partly or temporarily, in a manner that is consistent with that cue. Yet, the same cue can mean different things to different people...
April 16, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332293/beyond-the-dyadic-perspective-10-reasons-for-using-social-network-analysis-in-intergroup-contact-research
#19
Ralf Wölfer, Miles Hewstone
This article presents 10 reasons why social network analysis, a novel but still surprisingly underused approach in social psychology, can advance the analysis of intergroup contact. Although intergroup contact has been shown to improve intergroup relations, conventional methods leave some questions unanswered regarding the underlying social mechanisms that facilitate social cohesion between different groups in increasingly diverse societies. We will therefore explain the largely unknown conceptual and methodological advantages of social network analysis for studying intergroup contact in naturally existing groups, which are likely to help contact researchers to gain a better understanding of intergroup relations and guide attempts to overcome segregation, prejudice, discrimination, and intergroup conflict...
March 23, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317127/two-pathways-to-self-forgiveness-a-hedonic-path-via-self-compassion-and-a-eudaimonic-path-via-the-reaffirmation-of-violated-values
#20
Lydia Woodyatt, Michael Wenzel, Matthew Ferber
Self-forgiveness is often measured as a hedonic end-state, as the presence of positive affect and the absence of negative affect towards the self following a wrongdoing. However, self-forgiveness is also referred to as a difficult process. Self-forgiveness as a process of accepting responsibility and working through one's wrongdoing is a substantially un-hedonic - it is likely to be uncomfortable and at times painful. In this study, we examine two pathways to self-forgiveness: a hedonic focused pathway (via self-compassion) and a eudaimonic pathway (via reaffirmation of transgressed values)...
March 20, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
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