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British Journal of Social Psychology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332293/beyond-the-dyadic-perspective-10-reasons-for-using-social-network-analysis-in-intergroup-contact-research
#1
Ralf Wölfer, Miles Hewstone
This article presents 10 reasons why social network analysis, a novel but still surprisingly underused approach in social psychology, can advance the analysis of intergroup contact. Although intergroup contact has been shown to improve intergroup relations, conventional methods leave some questions unanswered regarding the underlying social mechanisms that facilitate social cohesion between different groups in increasingly diverse societies. We will therefore explain the largely unknown conceptual and methodological advantages of social network analysis for studying intergroup contact in naturally existing groups, which are likely to help contact researchers to gain a better understanding of intergroup relations and guide attempts to overcome segregation, prejudice, discrimination, and intergroup conflict...
March 23, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317127/two-pathways-to-self-forgiveness-a-hedonic-path-via-self-compassion-and-a-eudaimonic-path-via-the-reaffirmation-of-violated-values
#2
Lydia Woodyatt, Michael Wenzel, Matthew Ferber
Self-forgiveness is often measured as a hedonic end-state, as the presence of positive affect and the absence of negative affect towards the self following a wrongdoing. However, self-forgiveness is also referred to as a difficult process. Self-forgiveness as a process of accepting responsibility and working through one's wrongdoing is a substantially un-hedonic - it is likely to be uncomfortable and at times painful. In this study, we examine two pathways to self-forgiveness: a hedonic focused pathway (via self-compassion) and a eudaimonic pathway (via reaffirmation of transgressed values)...
March 20, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303581/the-sigh-of-the-oppressed-the-palliative-effects-of-ideology-are-stronger-for-people-living-in-highly-unequal-neighbourhoods
#3
Nikhil K Sengupta, Lara M Greaves, Danny Osborne, Chris G Sibley
Ideologies that legitimize status hierarchies are associated with increased well-being. However, which ideologies have 'palliative effects', why they have these effects, and whether these effects extend to low-status groups remain unresolved issues. This study aimed to address these issues by testing the effects of the ideology of Symbolic Prejudice on well-being among low- and high-status ethnic groups (4,519 Europeans and 1,091 Māori) nested within 1,437 regions in New Zealand. Results showed that Symbolic Prejudice predicted increased well-being for both groups, but that this relationship was stronger for those living in highly unequal neighbourhoods...
March 16, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28276075/change-commitment-in-low-status-merger-partners-the-role-of-information-processing-relative-ingroup-prototypicality-and-merger-patterns
#4
Miriam Rosa, Eithne Kavanagh, Pavel Kounov, Sywlia Jarosz, Sven Waldzus, Elizabeth C Collins, Steffen Giessner
Merger announcements cause stress among employees, often leading to low change commitment, especially among employees from the lower-status merger partner. Such stress influences how deeply employees process merger-relevant information. Previous research examined how merger patterns that preserve versus change status differences impact merger support, but did not address how employees' information processing may influence this relationship. The current research addresses this gap through a scenario experiment, focusing on the low-status merger partner...
March 9, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28261809/doing-many-things-at-a-time-lack-of-power-decreases-the-ability-to-multitask
#5
Ran Alice Cai, Ana Guinote
Three studies investigated the effects of power on the ability to pursue multiple, concomitant goals, also known as multitasking. It was predicted that powerless participants will show lower multitasking ability than control and powerful participants. Study 1 focused on self-reported ability to multitask in a sample of executives and subordinate employees. Studies 2 and 3 investigated the ability to dual-task and to switch between tasks, respectively, using dual-task and task-switching paradigms. Across the studies, powerless individuals were less able to effectively multitask compared with control and powerful participants, suggesting that the detrimental effects of lack of power extend beyond single-task environments, shown in past research, into multitasking environments...
March 6, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28239878/-appeals-to-nature-in-marriage-equality-debates-a-content-analysis-of-newspaper-and-social-media-discourse
#6
Cliodhna O'Connor
In May 2015, Ireland held a referendum to legalize same-sex marriage, which passed with 62% of the vote. This study explores the role played by 'appeals to nature' in the referendum debate. Little research has investigated how biological attributions are spontaneously generated in real-world discourse regarding sexual rights. Through content analysis of newspaper and Twitter discussion of the referendum, this study aims to (1) establish the frequency of appeals to nature and their distribution across the various 'sides' of the debate and (2) analyse the forms these natural claims took and the rhetorical functions they fulfilled...
February 27, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28198077/translation-strategies-contradiction-and-the-theory-of-social-representations-why-discussing-needles-may-improve-blood-donor-retention
#7
Gail Moloney, Jane Hayman, Marguerite Gamble, Geoff Smith, Rob Hall
Retaining blood donors is a cost-effective way of ensuring a safe blood supply, yet despite the plethora of research, only 5.1% of the eligible population in Australia donate blood and 40% of these do not make a second donation. We offer an alternative to traditional approaches by conceptualizing blood donation within social representations theory as socially derived symbolic knowledge with a specific focus on cognitive polyphasia and Guimelli's (1998) normative and functional dimensions. An online survey, completed by 703 residents from NSW Australia, comprised a blood donation word association task, Likert-style questions constructed from previous word association data and contextualized blood donation statements...
February 15, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28198021/internalizing-objectification-objectified-individuals-see-themselves-as-less-warm-competent-moral-and-human
#8
Steve Loughnan, Cristina Baldissarri, Federica Spaccatini, Laura Elder
People objectify others by viewing them as less warm, competent, moral, and human (Heflick & Goldenberg, 2009, J. Exp. Soc. Psychol., 45, 598; Vaes, Paladino, & Puvia, 2011, Eur. J. Soc. Psychol., 41, 774). In two studies, we examined whether the objectified share this view of themselves, internalizing their objectification. In Study 1 (N = 114), we examined sexual objectification, and in Study 2 (N = 62), we examined workplace objectification. Consistent across both studies, we found that objectification resulted in participants seeing themselves as less warm, competent, moral (Study 2 only), and lacking in human nature and human uniqueness...
February 15, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28188637/objectification-of-people-and-thoughts-an-attitude-change-perspective
#9
Pablo Briñol, Richard E Petty, Jennifer Belding
Many objectification phenomena can be understood from a mind-body dualism perspective in which the more people focus on their bodies, the less they focus on their minds. Instead of viewing mind and body in opposition to each other, we advocate for a more reciprocal view in which mind and body work in conjunction. Consistent with an integrated mind-body approach, we begin our review by describing research on embodied persuasion revealing that focusing on our own body can reduce but also increase thinking (elaboration), as well as affecting the use of thoughts in forming evaluations (validation)...
February 11, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28160297/-thinking-ill-of-others-without-sufficient-warrant-transcending-the-accuracy-inaccuracy-dualism-in-prejudice-and-stereotyping-research
#10
John Dixon
Research on prejudice seeks to understand and transform inaccurate beliefs about others. Indeed, historically such research has offered a cautionary tale of the biased nature of human cognition. Recently, however, this view has been challenged by work defending the essential rationality of intergroup perception, a theme captured controversially in Jussim and colleagues' (2009) research on the 'unbearable accuracy of stereotyping'. The present paper argues that in its own terms the 'rationalist turn' in socio-cognitive research on stereotyping presents an important challenge to the prejudice tradition, raising troubling questions about its conceptual and empirical foundations...
February 3, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28144960/using-the-sirde-model-of-social-change-to-examine-the-vote-of-scottish-teenagers-in-the-2014-independence-referendum
#11
Peter R Grant, Mark Bennett, Dominic Abrams
Five hundred and seventy-three Scottish high school students were surveyed in the 2 months following the 2014 referendum on Scotland's independence. We used the Social Identity, Relative Deprivation, collective Efficacy (SIRDE) model of social change to examine the social psychological factors that should have influenced the voting choices of these teenagers. Structural equation modelling indicated that the SIRDE model fit the data and largely supported four sets of hypotheses derived from the model. Specifically, (1) those with a stronger Scottish identity, (2) those who felt frustrated and angry that Scottish people are discriminated against in British society, and (3) those who believed that Scottish people are not able to improve their relatively poor social conditions within the United Kingdom (a lack of collective efficacy) were more likely to hold separatist beliefs...
February 1, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28127783/up-and-left-as-a-spatial-cue-of-leadership
#12
Maria Paola Paladino, Mara Mazzurega, Claudia Bonfiglioli
Cues of leadership are features that signal who is (or who is expected to be) the leader in a specific context. Although their use is widespread, empirical research is scarce, especially for spatial positioning as a sign of leadership. Based on work on spatial biases, we suggest here that the upper-left corner of a page is a spatial position associated with leadership. In the present studies (N = 455), we investigated this hypothesis and showed that a layout with a photograph positioned in the upper-left corner (compared to the upper-right, lower-left, or lower-right corner) led people to infer that the person portrayed in the photograph had a leading (vs...
January 27, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28097672/collective-resistance-despite-complicity-high-identifiers-rise-above-the-legitimization-of-disadvantage-by-the-in-group
#13
Gloria Jiménez-Moya, Rosa Rodríguez-Bailón, Russell Spears, Soledad de Lemus
How do individuals deal with group disadvantage when their fellow in-group members conceive it as legitimate? Integrating research on the normative conflict model (Packer, 2008, Pers. Soc. Psychol. Rev., 12, 50) and collective action, we expect high identifiers to reject the in-group norm of legitimacy that justifies the inequality, and to assert that the group is actually able and willing to contest the disadvantage by collective means. In Study 1 and Study 2, we tested this hypothesis in different intergroup contexts...
January 17, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28300298/editorial
#14
EDITORIAL
John Drury, Hanna Zagefka
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28300296/british-journal-of-social-psychology-call-for-special-section%C3%A2-proposals-deadline-31-july-2017
#15
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28300295/call-for-associate-editors
#16
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27762440/group-differences-in-the-legitimization-of-inequality-questioning-the-role-of-social-dominance-orientation
#17
Samuel Pehrson, Héctor Carvacho, Chris G Sibley
Social dominance orientation (SDO) is conceived as an individual's level of support for group-based hierarchy in general that causes support for more specific group hierarchies. According to social dominance theory, group differences in SDO underpin ideological and behavioural group differences related to specific group hierarchies. Using representative 5-year longitudinal panel data from New Zealand (N = 3,384), we test whether SDO mediates effects of sex and ethnicity on legitimizing myths (LMs) relating to gender and ethnic hierarchy over time...
March 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27709633/what-emotional-tears-convey-tearful-individuals-are-seen-as-warmer-but-also-as-less-competent
#18
Niels van de Ven, Maartje H J Meijs, Ad Vingerhoets
Earlier research found that the mere sight of tears promotes the willingness to provide support to the person shedding the tears. Other research, however, found that deliberate responses towards tearful persons could be more negative as well. We think this is because tears have ambivalent effects on person perception: We predicted that tearful people are seen as warmer, but also as less competent. In three studies, we asked participants (total N = 1,042) to form their impression of someone based on a picture...
March 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27709628/not-your-average-bigot-the-better-than-average-effect-and-defensive-responding-to-implicit-association-test-feedback
#19
Jennifer L Howell, Kate A Ratliff
A robust body of literature on the better-than-average effect suggests that people believe that they are better than the average others across a variety of domains. In two studies, we examined whether these better-than-average beliefs occur for bias related to stereotyping and prejudice. Moreover, we investigated the hypothesis that better-than-average beliefs will predict defensive responding to feedback indicating personal bias (e.g., preferences for majority groups, societally endorsed stereotypes). Specifically, we examined defensive responses to implicit attitude feedback...
March 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27616360/essentialist-beliefs-understanding-contact-with-and-attitudes-towards-lesbian-and-gay-individuals
#20
Ashley Lytle, Christina Dyar, Sheri R Levy, Bonita London
Sexual prejudice remains a widespread problem worldwide. Past research demonstrates that cross-orientation contact (contact between heterosexuals and lesbian/gay individuals) reduces sexual prejudice among heterosexuals, especially when contact is high quality. This study extends the literature on the relationship between cross-orientation contact and sexual prejudice and the mediation of this relationship by intergroup anxiety by examining the role of a key ideology - essentialist beliefs about homosexuality (immutability, universality, and discreteness beliefs)...
March 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
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