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British Journal of Social Psychology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29150851/outgroup-members-internal-criticism-promotes-intergroup-openness-the-role-of-perceived-risk
#1
Melissa McDonald, Samantha Brindley, Eran Halperin, Tamar Saguy
Research suggests that hearing an outgroup member voice internal criticism increases individuals' openness to the outgroup's perspective. We replicate and extend these findings in the context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Israeli participants exposed to a Palestinian official voicing internal criticism reported more openness to the Palestinian narrative of the conflict, an effect that was mediated by an increase in participants' perception that Palestinians are open-minded and a subsequent increase in their hope for more positive relations between the two groups...
November 17, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29124778/giving-versus-acting-using-latent-profile-analysis-to-distinguish-between-benevolent-and-activist-support-for-global-poverty-reduction
#2
Emma F Thomas, Craig McGarty
There are a variety of ways that people can respond to inequality. This article considers the distinction between collective giving and collective acting, but also adopts a focus on the people who engage in those behaviours. Benevolent supporters engage in efforts to alleviate suffering through the transfer of money or provision of goods ('giving'), while activist supporters engage in actions that aim to challenging an underlying injustice or exploitation ('acting'). Using samples obtained through anti-poverty non-governmental organizations (N = 2,340), latent profile analysis suggested two qualitatively different forms of support for global poverty reduction: a benevolent supporter profile (defined by moderate levels of charitable support) and an activist supporter profile (defined by engagement in a suite of socio-political actions)...
November 9, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29082532/the-impact-of-death-awareness-on-sizes-of-self-representational-objects
#3
Simon McCabe, Kenneth E Vail, Jamie Arndt
People seem to have a tendency to increase the relative size of self-representational objects. Prior research suggests that motivational factors may fuel that tendency, so the present research built from terror management theory to examine whether existential motivations - engendered by concerns about death - may have similar implications for self-relevant size biases. Specifically, across two studies (total N = 288), we hypothesized that reminders of death would lead participants to inflate the size of self-representational objects...
October 30, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29071732/unforgiveness-refining-theory-and-measurement-of-an-understudied-construct
#4
Madelynn R D Stackhouse, Rachel W Jones Ross, Susan D Boon
This research presents a multidimensional conceptualization of unforgiveness and the development and validation of the unforgiveness measure (UFM). The scale was developed based on a qualitative study of people's experiences of unforgiven interpersonal offences (Study 1). Three dimensions of unforgiveness emerged (Study 2): emotional-ruminative unforgiveness, cognitive-evaluative unforgiveness, and offender reconstrual. We supported the scale's factor structure, reliability, and validity (Study 3). We also established the convergent and discriminant validity of the UFM with measures of negative affect, rumination, forgiveness, cognitive reappraisal, and emotional suppression (Study 4)...
October 25, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28983928/highly-identified-power-holders-feel-responsible-the-interplay-between-social-identification-and-social-power-within-groups
#5
Annika Scholl, Kai Sassenberg, Naomi Ellemers, Daan Scheepers, Frank de Wit
Power relations affect dynamics within groups. Power-holders' decisions not only determine their personal outcomes, but also the outcomes of others in the group that they control. Yet, power-holders often tend to overlook this responsibility to take care of collective interests. The present research investigated how social identification - with the group to which both the powerful and the powerless belong - alters perceived responsibility among power-holders (and the powerless). Combining research on social power and social identity, we argue that power-holders perceive more responsibility than the powerless when strongly (rather than when weakly) identifying with the group...
October 6, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922457/how-negative-contact-and-positive-contact-with-whites-predict-collective-action-among-racial-and-ethnic-minorities
#6
Lydia E Hayward, Linda R Tropp, Matthew J Hornsey, Fiona Kate Barlow
Positive contact with advantaged group members can improve disadvantaged group members' attitudes towards them, yet it may also lower perceptions of group discrimination and consequent collective action. Little is known, however, about how negative contact with the advantaged predicts collective action among members of disadvantaged groups. With samples of Black and Hispanic Americans, we tested positive and negative contact with White Americans as predictors of self-reported collective action behaviour and future intentions...
September 18, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28921582/retribution-as-hierarchy-regulation-hierarchy-preferences-moderate-the-effect-of-offender-socioeconomic-status-on-support-for-retribution
#7
Liz Redford, Kate A Ratliff
People punish others for various reasons, including deterring future crime, incapacitating the offender, and retribution, or payback. The current research focuses on retribution, testing whether support for retribution is motivated by the desire to maintain social hierarchies. If so, then the retributive tendencies of hierarchy enhancers or hierarchy attenuators should depend on whether offenders are relatively lower or higher in status, respectively. Three studies showed that hierarchy attenuators were more retributive against high-status offenders than for low-status offenders, that hierarchy enhancers showed a stronger orientation towards retributive justice, and that relationship was stronger for low-status, rather than high-status, criminal offenders...
September 17, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28921604/stress-testing-the-affect-misattribution-procedure-heterogeneous-control-of-affect-misattribution-procedure-effects-under-incentives
#8
Chad J Hazlett, Adam J Berinsky
The affect misattribution procedure (AMP) is widely used to measure sensitive attitudes towards classes of stimuli, by estimating the effect that affectively charged prime images have on subsequent judgements of neutral target images. We test its resistance to efforts to conceal one's attitudes, by replicating the standard AMP design while offering small incentives to conceal attitudes towards the prime images. We find that although the average AMP effect remains positive, it decreases significantly in magnitude...
September 16, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28895158/effect-of-identity-fusion-on-decision-to-make-extreme-sacrifices-in-romantic-relationships-the%C3%A2-moderating-role-of-impulsiveness
#9
Minjoo Joo, Sun W Park
The present research investigated the roles of identity fusion and impulsiveness in extreme sacrifices for romantic partners. After completing questionnaires assessing identity fusion, inclusion of other in the self, passionate love, and communal orientation, participants responded to the trolley dilemma in which they could save their partner by sacrificing themselves. Participants in the time-pressure condition were given eight-seconds to respond to the dilemma; the other group had no time constraints. Identity fusion was the only variable that significantly predicted ultimate sacrifice...
September 12, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28892168/-where-there-is-a-will-there-is-a-way-belief-in-school-meritocracy-and-the-social-class-achievement-gap
#10
Céline Darnon, Virginie Wiederkehr, Benoît Dompnier, Delphine Martinot
Meritocratic ideology can promote system justification and the perpetuation of inequalities. The present research tests whether priming merit in the school context enhances the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) on school achievement. French fifth graders read a text priming either school merit or a neutral content, reported their French and mathematics self-efficacy as well as their belief in school meritocracy (BSM), and then took French and mathematics tests. Compared to the neutral condition, the merit prime condition increased the SES achievement gap...
September 11, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28857198/low-relational-mobility-leads-to-greater-motivation-to-understand-enemies-but-not-friends-and-acquaintances
#11
Liman Man Wai Li, Takahiko Masuda, Hajin Lee
Enemyship occurs across societies, but it has not received as much attention as other types of relationships such as friendship in previous research. This research examined the influence of relational mobility on people's motivation to understand their personal enemies by measuring different dependent variables across three studies. First, a cross-cultural comparison study found that Hong Kong Chinese, from a low-relational-mobility society, reported a stronger desire to seek proximity to enemies relative to European Canadians, from a high-relational-mobility society (Study 1)...
August 31, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28872208/call-for-submissions-british-journal-of-social-psychology-special-section-on-understanding-rapid-societal-change-emerging-perspectives-and-methods
#12
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28815636/muslims-tolerance-towards-outgroups-longitudinal-evidence-for-the-role-of-respect
#13
Bernd Simon, Christoph Daniel Schaefer
We employed a longitudinal design to test two hypotheses concerning Muslims' respect for and tolerance towards disapproved outgroups. In support of the outgroup respect-tolerance hypothesis derived from the disapproval-respect model of social tolerance, our results strongly suggest that respect for disapproved outgroups is not just a correlate of tolerance towards those groups, but a causal antecedent. In support of the intergroup respect-reciprocity hypothesis, we identified respect from disapproved outgroups as an effective source of respect for disapproved outgroups and therefore also as a (distal) source of tolerance towards those groups...
August 15, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28779499/-i-didn-t-mean-that-it-was-just-a-slip-of-the-tongue-racial-slips-and-gaffes-in-the-public-arena
#14
Rose Burford-Rice, Martha Augoustinos
Speech errors, slips, and gaffes made in the public arena that are perceived to be either implicitly or explicitly racially offensive often result in significant social consequences to the responsible speaker and generate public controversy. The current research, informed by conversation analysis and discursive psychology, examines how speakers manage such troubles-in-speaking in public settings. The sample of naturalistic data includes five such instances and related apologies sourced from YouTube and news websites...
August 4, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28762554/meaning-and-death-thought-accessibility
#15
Daryl R Van Tongeren, Jeffrey D Green
Meaning is a central feature in human life, but death can disrupt a sense of meaning. Two experiments tested the hypothesis that meaning in life and meaning in death are distinct types of meaning when mortality is salient and differentially affect death-thought accessibility (DTA). In Experiment 1, imagining a specific scenario in which meaning is preserved beyond death reduced DTA relative to a standard mortality salience prime; moreover, these effects were not due to changes in self-esteem. In Experiment 2, imagining a meaningful life when mortality is salient elicited greater DTA, whereas imagining meaning in death elicited less DTA...
August 1, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28741679/comparing-social-group-identifications-and-socioeconomic-deprivation-as-predictors-of-psychological-distress-evidence-from-a-scottish-primary-care-sample
#16
Fabia Cientanni, Kevin Power, Fabio Sani, Christopher Wright, Frances Baty, Kerry Hustings, David Morgan, Gary Tanner
Social group identification and socioeconomic deprivation have both been linked to self-reported depressive symptoms in general population samples; however, no study to date has explored the strength of the joint predictive value of these factors within a mental health population. The current study explored the impact of social group identifications and socioeconomic deprivation, together with important clinical and demographic variables, on psychological distress in a Scottish mental health sample. Participants (N = 976) were recruited from referrals to a computerized cognitive behavioural therapy (cCBT) programme in Scotland, 'Beating the Blues' (BtB) over a 25-month period...
July 25, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28653413/normalizing-trust-participants-immediately-post-hoc-explanations-of-behaviour-in-milgram-s-obedience-experiments
#17
Matthew M Hollander, Jason Turowetz
We bring an ethnomethodological perspective on language and discourse to a data source crucial for explaining behaviour in social psychologist Stanley Milgram's classic 'obedience' experiments - yet one largely overlooked by the Milgram literature. In hundreds of interviews conducted immediately after each experiment, participants sought to justify their actions, often doing so by normalizing the situation as benign, albeit uncomfortable. Examining 91 archived recordings of these interviews from several experimental conditions, we find four recurrent accounts for continuation, each used more frequently by 'obedient' than 'defiant' participants...
June 26, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28653379/only-one-small-sin-how-self-construal-affects-self-control
#18
Janina Steinmetz, Thomas Mussweiler
Past research has shown that self-construal can influence self-control by reducing interdependent people's impulsivity in the presence of peers. We broaden these findings by examining the hypothesis that an interdependent (vs. independent) self-construal fosters self-control even in the absence of peers and for non-impulsive decisions. We further explore whether this effect could be mediated by the more interrelated (vs. isolated) processing style of interdependent (vs. independent) people. Such an interrelated (vs...
June 26, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28639419/examining-the-role-of-positive-and-negative-intergroup-contact-and-anti-immigrant-prejudice-in-brexit
#19
Rose Meleady, Charles R Seger, Marieke Vermue
This study examined the interplay of anti-immigrant prejudice and intergroup contact experience on voting intentions within Britain's 2016 referendum on its membership in the European Union. In the days before the referendum, we asked more than 400 British people how they planned to vote. We measured a number of demographic factors expected to predict voting intentions as well as individuals' prejudice towards and intergroup contact experience (positive and negative) with EU immigrants. Anti-immigrant prejudice was a strong correlate of support for Brexit...
June 21, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28623855/authentic-feminist-authenticity-and-feminist-identity-in-teenage-feminists-talk
#20
Octavia Calder-Dawe, Nicola Gavey
This article explores how young people's feminist identities take shape in conjunction with a contemporary ideal of personal authenticity: to know and to express the 'real me'. Drawing from interviews with 18 teenagers living in Auckland, New Zealand, we examine a novel convergence of authenticity and feminism in participants' identity talk. For social psychologists interested in identity and politics, this convergence is intriguing: individualizing values such as authenticity are generally associated with disengagement with structural critique and with a repudiation of politicized and activist identities...
June 17, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
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