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British Journal of Social Psychology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28623855/authentic-feminist-authenticity-and-feminist-identity-in-teenage-feminists-talk
#1
Octavia Calder-Dawe, Nicola Gavey
This article explores how young people's feminist identities take shape in conjunction with a contemporary ideal of personal authenticity: to know and to express the 'real me'. Drawing from interviews with 18 teenagers living in Auckland, New Zealand, we examine a novel convergence of authenticity and feminism in participants' identity talk. For social psychologists interested in identity and politics, this convergence is intriguing: individualizing values such as authenticity are generally associated with disengagement with structural critique and with a repudiation of politicized and activist identities...
June 17, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28612450/perception-of-emotional-climate-in-a-revolution-test-of-a-multistage-theory-of-revolution-in-the-tunisian-context
#2
Bernard Rimé, Vincent Yzerbyt, Abdelwahab Mahjoub
Participation in social movements and collective action depends upon people's capacity to perceive their societal context. We examined this question in the context of Arab Spring revolutions. In a classic theory of revolution highlighting the role of collective emotions, Brinton (1938) claimed that revolutions, far from chaos, proceed in an orderly sequence involving four stages: euphoria, degradation, terror, and restoration. The emotional climate (EC) as perceived by ordinary Tunisian citizens (2,699 women and 3,816 men) was measured during the 4 years of the Tunisian revolution...
June 13, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28547845/institutional-apologies-and-socio-emotional-climate-in-the-south-american-context
#3
Magdalena Bobowik, Darío Páez, Maitane Arnoso, Manuel Cárdenas, Bernard Rimé, Elena Zubieta, Marcela Muratori
This study examined perceptions of institutional apologies related to past political violence and socio-emotional climate among victims and non-victims in Argentina (n = 518), Chile (n = 1,278), and Paraguay (n = 1,172) based on quasi-representative samples. The perceptions of apology as sincere and efficient in improving intergroup relations were associated with a positive socio-emotional climate across the three nations. Victims evaluated apologies more positively and perceived a more positive socio-emotional climate compared to non-victims in Paraguay and Argentina, whereas the opposite was true in Chile where the government opposed the victims' leftist political orientation...
May 25, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28547824/the-promise-of-a-better-group-future-cognitive-alternatives-increase-students-self-efficacy-and-academic-performance
#4
Aarti Iyer, Airong Zhang, Jolanda Jetten, Zhen Hao, Lijuan Cui
Drawing on classic social identity theorizing (Tajfel, Differentiation between social groups: Studies in the social psychology of intergroup relations, London, UK, Academic Press, 1978), we propose that low-status minority group members' self-efficacy and performance on intellectual tasks can be enhanced by prompting them to believe in a better future for their group (i.e., increasing awareness of cognitive alternatives to the existing low-status position). Study 1 manipulated cognitive alternatives among 157 migrant workers' children in China, showing that self-efficacy was enhanced in the high compared to the low cognitive alternative condition...
May 25, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28547801/is-higher-inequality-less-legitimate-depends-on-how-you-frame-it
#5
Susanne Bruckmüller, Gerhard Reese, Sarah E Martiny
Economic inequality is increasing both globally and in various countries around the world, and such inequality has been linked to worsening health, well-being, and social cohesion. A key predictor for whether people take action against inequality is the extent to which they perceive it as illegitimate. We investigate how two variables jointly predict the legitimization of inequality, namely the perceived magnitude of differences in economic outcomes and the way these differences are described. Two experiments (total N = 190) tested whether framing the same difference in outcomes as an advantaged group having more or as a disadvantaged group having less moderates whether higher inequality is perceived as less legitimate...
May 25, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28474440/in-a-moral-dilemma-choose-the-one-you-love-impartial-actors-are-seen-as-less-moral-than-partial-ones
#6
Jamie S Hughes
Although impartiality and concern for the greater good are lauded by utilitarian philosophies, it was predicted that when values conflict, those who acted impartially rather than partially would be viewed as less moral. Across four studies, using life-or-death scenarios and more mundane ones, support for the idea that relationship obligations are important in moral attribution was found. In Studies 1-3, participants rated an impartial actor as less morally good and his or her action as less moral compared to a partial actor...
May 4, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28466538/judging-the-gender-of-the-inanimate-benevolent-sexism-and-gender-stereotypes-guide-impressions-of-physical-objects
#7
Benjamin R Meagher
Within a given culture, sexist ideologies and stereotypes are largely characterized by their prescriptive expectations for the types of social and behavioural domains men and women occupy. The activities that take place within these respective domains, however, frequently involve designed, physical artefacts. This study reports a pair of studies that test whether sexist schemas are capable of guiding not only impressions of men and women as social groups, but also their impressions of the inanimate objects associated with these groups...
May 2, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28436083/the-added-value-of-world-views-over-self-views-predicting-modest-behaviour-in-eastern-and-western-cultures
#8
Sylvia Xiaohua Chen, Jacky C K Ng, Emma E Buchtel, Yanjun Guan, Hong Deng, Michael Harris Bond
Personality research has been focused on different aspects of the self, including traits, attitudes, beliefs, goals, and motivation. These aspects of the self are used to explain and predict social behaviour. The present research assessed generalized beliefs about the world, termed 'social axioms' (Leung et al., ), and examined their additive power over beliefs about the self in explaining a communal behaviour, that is, modesty. Three studies predicted reported modest behaviour among Mainland Chinese, Hong Kong Chinese, East Asian Canadians, and European Canadians...
April 24, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419478/exposure-to-the-american-flag-polarizes-democratic-republican-ideologies
#9
Eugene Y Chan
Some prior research has suggested that exposure to the American flag tilts Americans towards Republicanism, while others have proffered that it brings outs a common 'together' perspective instead. We explore a third possibility - that it may actually polarize Americans' political ideology. It is generally accepted that exposure to an environmental cue can shift attitudes and behaviours, at least partly or temporarily, in a manner that is consistent with that cue. Yet, the same cue can mean different things to different people...
April 16, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28581150/objectification-seeing-and-treating-people-as-things
#10
EDITORIAL
Steve Loughnan, Jeroen Vaes
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332293/beyond-the-dyadic-perspective-10-reasons-for-using-social-network-analysis-in-intergroup-contact-research
#11
Ralf Wölfer, Miles Hewstone
This article presents 10 reasons why social network analysis, a novel but still surprisingly underused approach in social psychology, can advance the analysis of intergroup contact. Although intergroup contact has been shown to improve intergroup relations, conventional methods leave some questions unanswered regarding the underlying social mechanisms that facilitate social cohesion between different groups in increasingly diverse societies. We will therefore explain the largely unknown conceptual and methodological advantages of social network analysis for studying intergroup contact in naturally existing groups, which are likely to help contact researchers to gain a better understanding of intergroup relations and guide attempts to overcome segregation, prejudice, discrimination, and intergroup conflict...
March 23, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317127/two-pathways-to-self-forgiveness-a-hedonic-path-via-self-compassion-and-a-eudaimonic-path-via-the-reaffirmation-of-violated-values
#12
Lydia Woodyatt, Michael Wenzel, Matthew Ferber
Self-forgiveness is often measured as a hedonic end-state, as the presence of positive affect and the absence of negative affect towards the self following a wrongdoing. However, self-forgiveness is also referred to as a difficult process. Self-forgiveness as a process of accepting responsibility and working through one's wrongdoing is a substantially un-hedonic - it is likely to be uncomfortable and at times painful. In this study, we examine two pathways to self-forgiveness: a hedonic focused pathway (via self-compassion) and a eudaimonic pathway (via reaffirmation of transgressed values)...
March 20, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303581/the-sigh-of-the-oppressed-the-palliative-effects-of-ideology-are-stronger-for-people-living-in-highly-unequal-neighbourhoods
#13
Nikhil K Sengupta, Lara M Greaves, Danny Osborne, Chris G Sibley
Ideologies that legitimize status hierarchies are associated with increased well-being. However, which ideologies have 'palliative effects', why they have these effects, and whether these effects extend to low-status groups remain unresolved issues. This study aimed to address these issues by testing the effects of the ideology of Symbolic Prejudice on well-being among low- and high-status ethnic groups (4,519 Europeans and 1,091 Māori) nested within 1,437 regions in New Zealand. Results showed that Symbolic Prejudice predicted increased well-being for both groups, but that this relationship was stronger for those living in highly unequal neighbourhoods...
March 16, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28276075/change-commitment-in-low-status-merger-partners-the-role-of-information-processing-relative-ingroup-prototypicality-and-merger-patterns
#14
Miriam Rosa, Eithne Kavanagh, Pavel Kounov, Sywlia Jarosz, Sven Waldzus, Elizabeth C Collins, Steffen Giessner
Merger announcements cause stress among employees, often leading to low change commitment, especially among employees from the lower-status merger partner. Such stress influences how deeply employees process merger-relevant information. Previous research examined how merger patterns that preserve versus change status differences impact merger support, but did not address how employees' information processing may influence this relationship. The current research addresses this gap through a scenario experiment, focusing on the low-status merger partner...
March 9, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28261809/doing-many-things-at-a-time-lack-of-power-decreases-the-ability-to-multitask
#15
Ran Alice Cai, Ana Guinote
Three studies investigated the effects of power on the ability to pursue multiple, concomitant goals, also known as multitasking. It was predicted that powerless participants will show lower multitasking ability than control and powerful participants. Study 1 focused on self-reported ability to multitask in a sample of executives and subordinate employees. Studies 2 and 3 investigated the ability to dual-task and to switch between tasks, respectively, using dual-task and task-switching paradigms. Across the studies, powerless individuals were less able to effectively multitask compared with control and powerful participants, suggesting that the detrimental effects of lack of power extend beyond single-task environments, shown in past research, into multitasking environments...
March 6, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28300298/editorial
#16
EDITORIAL
John Drury, Hanna Zagefka
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28300296/british-journal-of-social-psychology-call-for-special-section%C3%A2-proposals-deadline-31-july-2017
#17
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28300295/call-for-associate-editors
#18
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28160297/-thinking-ill-of-others-without-sufficient-warrant-transcending-the-accuracy-inaccuracy-dualism-in-prejudice-and-stereotyping-research
#19
John Dixon
Research on prejudice seeks to understand and transform inaccurate beliefs about others. Indeed, historically such research has offered a cautionary tale of the biased nature of human cognition. Recently, however, this view has been challenged by work defending the essential rationality of intergroup perception, a theme captured controversially in Jussim and colleagues' (2009) research on the 'unbearable accuracy of stereotyping'. The present paper argues that in its own terms the 'rationalist turn' in socio-cognitive research on stereotyping presents an important challenge to the prejudice tradition, raising troubling questions about its conceptual and empirical foundations...
March 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28097672/collective-resistance-despite-complicity-high-identifiers-rise-above-the-legitimization-of-disadvantage-by-the-in-group
#20
Gloria Jiménez-Moya, Rosa Rodríguez-Bailón, Russell Spears, Soledad de Lemus
How do individuals deal with group disadvantage when their fellow in-group members conceive it as legitimate? Integrating research on the normative conflict model (Packer, 2008, Pers. Soc. Psychol. Rev., 12, 50) and collective action, we expect high identifiers to reject the in-group norm of legitimacy that justifies the inequality, and to assert that the group is actually able and willing to contest the disadvantage by collective means. In Study 1 and Study 2, we tested this hypothesis in different intergroup contexts...
March 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
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