journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Clinics in Laboratory Medicine

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802507/preface
#1
EDITORIAL
Steven D Billings
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802506/inflammatory-dermatopathology-for-general-surgical-pathologists
#2
REVIEW
Emily H Smith, May P Chan
Owing to the wide variety and complexity of inflammatory skin diseases, inflammatory dermatopathology can be a challenging topic for dermatopathologists and general surgical pathologists alike. Following a basic tissue reaction pattern approach, this article reviews the most common and important entities of each pattern, with emphasis on differential diagnosis, diagnostic pitfalls, and appropriate workup when indicated. A few dermatologic emergencies are also discussed.
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802505/soft-tissue-tumors-of-uncertain-histogenesis-a-review-for-dermatopathologists
#3
REVIEW
Darya Buehler, Paul Weisman
The mesenchymal tumors discussed herein represent a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with distinctive morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular genetic features. These uncommon tumors often arise in the dermis and subcutis and can pose a major diagnostic challenge to dermatopathologists because they closely mimic melanoma, carcinoma, fibrous histiocytoma, schwannoma, or granulomatous inflammation. This article reviews the clinical presentation, histopathology, differential diagnosis, and diagnostic pitfalls of epithelioid sarcoma, clear cell sarcoma, perivascular epithelioid cell tumor, ossifying fibromyxoid tumor, pleomorphic hyalinizing angiectatic tumor, and hemosiderotic fibrolipomatous tumor...
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802504/cutaneous-malignant-vascular-neoplasms
#4
REVIEW
Wonwoo Shon, Steven D Billings
Accurate diagnosis of cutaneous malignant vascular tumors, including angiosarcoma and epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, is critical for determination of appropriate clinical management and prognosis. Although there have been significant advances in understanding genetic aspects of cutaneous vascular biology, differential diagnosis of malignant vascular tumor involving skin and superficial soft tissue is a frequent source of difficulty. This brief overview highlights the clinicopathologic features of primary and secondary cutaneous angiosarcoma and epithelioid hemangioendothelioma and also provides a short summary of newer molecular data...
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802503/fibrohistiocytic-tumors
#5
REVIEW
Ryan C Romano, Karen J Fritchie
Fibrohistiocytic tumors are a diverse group of reactive and neoplastic lesions including xanthoma, fibrous histiocytoma and its variants, solitary xanthogranuloma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, and atypical fibroxanthoma. This article reviews some of the more commonly encountered fibrohistiocytic tumors with an emphasis on clinical presentation, macroscopic and histologic characteristics, molecular/cytogenetic findings where applicable, and differential diagnoses.
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802502/cutaneous-sweat-gland-carcinomas-with-basaloid-differentiation-an-update-with-emphasis-on-differential-diagnoses
#6
REVIEW
Katharina Flux, Thomas Brenn
This article focuses on primary cutaneous sweat gland carcinomas with basaloid differentiation, including cribriform apocrine carcinoma, endocrine mucin-producing sweat gland carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, spiradenocarcinoma, and digital papillary adenocarcinoma. These tumors are rare and pose a significant diagnostic challenge. Their clinical presentation is nonspecific and there is significant overlap of their histologic features. Confident diagnosis is necessary because their clinical behavior ranges from indolent, nonrecurring, nonmetastasizing tumors to those with potential for disseminated disease and mortality...
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802501/myeloid-neoplasms
#7
REVIEW
Antonio Subtil
The classification of myeloid neoplasms has undergone major changes and currently relies heavily on genetic abnormalities. Cutaneous manifestations of myeloid neoplasms may be the presenting sign of underlying bone marrow disease. Dermal infiltration by neoplastic cells may occur in otherwise normal skin or in sites of cutaneous inflammation. Leukemia cutis occasionally precedes evidence of blood and/or bone marrow involvement (aleukemic leukemia cutis).
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802500/primary-cutaneous-b-cell-lymphomas
#8
REVIEW
Charity B Hope, Laura B Pincus
B-cell lymphomas represent approximately 20% to 25% of primary cutaneous lymphomas. Within this group, most cases (>99%) are encompassed by 3 diagnostic entities: primary cutaneous marginal zone lymphoma, primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma, and primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type. In this article, the authors present clinical, histopathologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular features of each of these entities and briefly discuss the rarer intravascular large B-cell lymphoma.
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802499/cutaneous-t-cell-lymphoma
#9
REVIEW
Melissa Pulitzer
Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by monoclonal proliferations of T lymphocytes primarily involving skin, modified skin appendages, and some mucosal sites. This article addresses the basic clinical, histologic, and immunohistochemical characteristics of this group of diseases, with additional attention to evolving literature on dermoscopy, reflectance confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and molecular data that may increasingly be applied to diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms in these diseases...
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802498/cutaneous-squamous-cell-carcinoma
#10
REVIEW
Vishwas Parekh, John T Seykora
Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is a malignant neoplasm of the skin characterized by an aberrant proliferation of keratinocytes. Cutaneous SCC is the second most common malignancy globally, and usually arises in the chronically sun-damaged skin of elderly white individuals. From a pathologist's perspective, it is important to differentiate cSCC from the benign and reactive squamoproliferative lesions and identify the high-risk features associated with aggressive tumor behavior. In this article, we provide an up-to-date overview of cSCC along with its precursor lesions and important histologic variants, with a particular emphasis on the histopathologic features and molecular pathogenesis...
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802497/update-on-merkel-cell-carcinoma
#11
REVIEW
Paul W Harms
Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy. Merkel cell polyomavirus, a tumorigenic DNA virus, is present in most MCC tumors, with implications for tumor biology, diagnosis, and management. Merkel cell polyomavirus-negative tumors have a high burden of UV-signature mutations, similar to melanoma. The histopathologic diagnosis of MCC requires immunohistochemistry to exclude morphologically similar entities. Therapies for advanced disease are currently lacking. Here, the features of MCC are reviewed, including recent molecular discoveries with implications for improved therapy for advanced disease...
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802496/molecular-melanoma-diagnosis-update-gene-fusion-genomic-hybridization-and-massively-parallel-short-read-sequencing
#12
REVIEW
Ursula E Lang, Iwei Yeh, Timothy H McCalmont
Molecular evaluation of melanocytic tumors can be diagnostically useful to confirm malignancy or benignancy. Molecular tools are ancillary and supplemental to histopathologic evaluation and do not replace conventional microscopy. Immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, array comparative genomic hybridization, and massively parallel short-read sequencing, often referred to as next-generation sequencing, each provide varied (and often incomplete) additional information, and careful planning is necessary if tissue is limited...
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802495/the-immunology-of-melanoma
#13
REVIEW
Jennifer S Ko
The relatively high DNA mutational burden in melanoma allows for the creation of potentially "foreign," immune-stimulating neoantigens, and leads to its exceptional immunogenicity. Brisk tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, a marker of immune editing, confer improved overall survival in melanoma, possibly due to reduced sentinel lymph node spread. Meanwhile, T-cell-stimulating drugs, so-called T-cell checkpoint inhibitors, which reverse peripheral tolerance-dependent tumor escape, have demonstrated unparalleled clinical success in metastatic melanoma...
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802494/toward-a-molecular-genetic-classification-of-spitzoid-neoplasms
#14
REVIEW
Michael T Tetzlaff, Alexandre Reuben, Steven D Billings, Victor G Prieto, Jonathan L Curry
The histopathologic spectrum of Spitzoid neoplasms includes Spitz nevi, atypical Spitz tumors, and Spitzoid melanomas. Advances in molecular genetics have evolved to the point that Spitzoid lesions can now be reasonably classified according to their distinctive molecular-genetic alterations: Spitzoid lesions with (1) 11p amplification and/or HRAS mutations; (2) isolated loss of 6q23 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH); (3) homozygous deletion of 9p21 by FISH; (4) BAP1 loss and BRAFV600 E mutation; (5) translocations involving any of a number of different oncogenic kinase drivers, including ROS1, ALK, NTRK1, NTRK3, MET, BRAF, and RET; and (6) TERT promoter mutations...
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802493/sentinel-lymph-nodes-in-cutaneous-melanoma
#15
REVIEW
Victor G Prieto
Examination of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) has probably become the most popular method of early staging of patients with cutaneous melanoma. SLNs are considered to be the most likely ones to contain metastatic deposits; thus, they can be examined in a more intense manner than in standard lymphadenectomy. Most processing protocols use formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin with the addition of immunohistochemistry. Approximately 20% of patients with cutaneous melanoma show melanoma cells in the SLNs...
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802492/blue-nevi-and-related-tumors
#16
REVIEW
Artur Zembowicz
The major entities related to blue nevus are common blue nevus, cellular blue nevus, atypical blue nevus, and malignant blue nevus. These lesions share presence of dermal pigmented dendritic melanocytes derived from embryonal precursors to melanocytes, Schwann cells, and glial cells migrating to the skin from the ventral neural crest. Genetically, blue nevi harbor mutations in G-protein-coupled receptor subunits GNAQ and GNA11. Progression to malignant blue nevus is associated with additional mutations and partial gains and losses of chromosomal material...
September 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28457357/preface
#17
EDITORIAL
Nahed Ismail, James W Snyder, A William Pasculle
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28457356/rickettsiae-as-emerging-infectious-agents
#18
REVIEW
Rong Fang, Lucas S Blanton, David H Walker
With advances in molecular genetics, more pathogenic rickettsial species have been identified. Pathogenic rickettsiae are transmitted by vectors, such as arthropods, into the patient's skin and then spread into the microvascular endothelial cells. Clinical manifestations are characterized by fever with headache and myalgias, followed by rash 3 to 5 days later. The undifferentiated nature of clinical symptoms, knowledge of the epidemiology, and the patient's history of travel and exposure to arthropod vectors are critical to the empiric administration of antimicrobial therapy...
June 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28457355/chikungunya-virus
#19
REVIEW
David M Vu, Donald Jungkind, Angelle Desiree LaBeaud
For chikungunya virus (CHIKV), the long-term sequelae from infection are yet ill-defined. The prolonged debilitating arthralgia associated with CHIKV infection has tremendous potential for impacting the global economy and should be considered when evaluating the human burden of disease and the allocation of resources. There is much still unknown about CHIKV and the illnesses that it causes. Developing a better understanding of the pathogenesis of CHIKV infection is a priority and forms the basis for developing effective strategies at infection prevention and disease control...
June 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28457354/clostridium-difficile
#20
REVIEW
Scott R Curry
Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) have emerged as one of the principal threats to the health of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The importance of C difficile colonization is increasingly recognized not only as a source for false-positive clinical testing but also as a source of new infections within hospitals and other health care environments. In the last five years, several new treatment strategies that capitalize on the increasing understanding of the altered microbiome and host defenses in patients with CDI have completed clinical trials, including fecal microbiota transplantation...
June 2017: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine
journal
journal
28065
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"