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Family Relations

Julie Ma, Andrew Grogan-Kaylor, Jorge Delva
Research that simultaneously examines the relationship of multiple types of family and community violence with youth outcomes is limited in the previous research literature, particularly in Latin America. This study examined the relationship of youth exposure to family and community violence-parental use of corporal punishment, violence in the community, intimate partner physical aggression-with eight subscales of the Youth Self Report among a Chilean sample of 593 youth-mother pairs. Results from multilevel models indicated a positive association between youth exposure to violence in the family and community, and a wide range of behavior problem outcomes, in particular, aggression...
July 2016: Family Relations
Gregory C Smith, Frederick Strieder, Patty Greenberg, Bert Hayslip, Julian Montoro-Rodriguez
The authors used Andersen's (2008) behavior model to investigate patterns of enrollment and treatment engagement among 343 custodial grandmothers who participated in a randomized clinical trial of three psychosocial interventions:(a) a behavioral parenting program, (b) a cognitive behavioral coping program, or (c) an information-only condition. Treatment completion was superior to that typically found with birth parents, even though the grandmothers and their target grandchildren both had high levels of mental and physical health challenges...
April 2016: Family Relations
Barbara M Altman, Debra L Blackwell
Understanding the demographic structure of households containing members with disabilities is of key importance in policy planning for populations with disabilities at state and national levels. Yet, most, but not all, previous family-level studies of disability have excluded persons living alone or with unrelated persons (e.g., a housemate or an unmarried partner) because they are not considered families. To address this gap, the authors utilize National Health Interview Survey data to produce household-level estimates of disability using a detailed household type variable that includes households omitted from previous reports...
February 2016: Family Relations
Erin C Casey, Rebecca J Shlafer, Ann S Masten
The current study aimed to describe the prevalence of children of incarcerated parents (COIP) in a sample of homeless/highly mobile children, examine the relationship between parental incarceration and other risk factors, and investigate the effect of parental incarceration on child academic and mental health outcomes. The authors compared COIP (n = 45) to children whose parents were never incarcerated (n = 93) within a sample of 138, 4- to 7-year-old ethnically diverse children residing in emergency homeless shelters...
October 1, 2015: Family Relations
Gregory C Smith, Kelly E Cichy, Julian Montoro-Rodriguez
The authors blended elements from the Stress Process Model and the Family Stress Model to investigate the direct and indirect effects of custodial grandmothers' (CGMs') coping resources (i.e., active strategies, passive strategies, and social support) on their psychological distress, their parenting practices, and their grandchild's internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Participants included African American and White CGMs (N = 733, M age = 56) who provided full-time care to a grandchild (Mage = 9.8). Structural equation modeling revealed that social support and active coping were related to lower CGM distress and less ineffective parenting, whereas passive coping was associated with increased distress and more ineffective parenting...
July 2015: Family Relations
Holly A Grant-Marsney, Harold D Grotevant, Aline G Sayer
This study examined whether adolescents' closeness to adoptive parents (APs) predicted attachment styles in close relationships outside their family during young adulthood. In a longitudinal study of domestic infant adoptions, closeness to adoptive mother and adoptive father was assessed in 156 adolescents (M = 15.7 years). Approximately nine years later (M = 25.0 years), closeness to parents was assessed again as well as attachment style in their close relationships. Multilevel modeling was used to predict attachment style in young adulthood from the average and discrepancy of closeness to adolescents' adoptive mothers and fathers and the change over time in closeness to APs...
April 2015: Family Relations
David MacPhee, Erika Lunkenheimer, Nathaniel Riggs
Resilience can be defined as establishing equilibrium subsequent to disturbances to a system caused by significant adversity. When families experience adversity or transitions, multiple regulatory processes may be involved in establishing equilibrium, including adaptability, regulation of negative affect, and effective problem-solving skills. The authors' resilience-as-regulation perspective integrates insights about the regulation of individual development with processes that regulate family systems. This middle-range theory of family resilience focuses on regulatory processes across levels that are involved in adaptation: whole-family systems such as routines and sense of coherence; coregulation of dyads involving emotion regulation, structuring, and reciprocal influences between social partners; and individual self-regulation...
February 15, 2015: Family Relations
Sunhye Bai, Rena L Repetti
The authors review naturalistic studies of short-term processes that appear to promote resilience in children in the context of everyday family life and argue that warm and supportive family interactions foster resilience through their cumulative impact on children's emotional and physiological stress response systems. In the short-term, these family interactions promote the experience and expression of positive emotion and healthy patterns of diurnal cortisol. Over time, these internal resources - a propensity to experience positive emotion and a well-functioning hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis system -enhance a child's capacity to avoid, or limit, the deleterious effects of adversity...
February 2015: Family Relations
Ella Vanderbilt-Adriance, Daniel S Shaw, Lauretta M Brennan, Thomas J Dishion, Frances Gardner, Melvin N Wilson
The present study utilized a resilience model to investigate child, family, and community protective factors in toddlerhood as they relate to low levels of conduct problems at age 5 in a sample of low income children at risk for early disruptive problem behavior. Child, family, and community factors were associated with lower levels of conduct problems at age 5. Child, family, and community protective factors also distinguished between children who remained below and above a clinical threshold for aggressive problems between age 2 and 5...
February 1, 2015: Family Relations
Tricia K Neppl, Shinyoung Jeon, Thomas J Schofield, M Brent Donnellan
The current study describes how positivity can be incorporated into the Family Stress Model to explain resilience to disrupted family processes in the face of economic distress. Prospective, longitudinal data came from 451 mothers, fathers, and youth participating from their adolescence through early adulthood. Assessments included observational and self-report measures. Information regarding economic pressure, parental positivity, and parenting were collected during early adolescence, positivity was collected in late adolescence and emerging adulthood...
February 2015: Family Relations
David Cordova, Amanda Ciofu, Richard Cervantes
Despite the profound impact that intrafamilial stressors, including parent - adolescent acculturation discrepancies, may have on Latino adolescent behavioral and mental health, this line of research remains underdeveloped. The purpose of this study is to obtain rich descriptions from Latino adolescents of the most salient intrafamilial stressors. The authors employ focus group methodology with a grounded theory approach. A total of 25 focus groups were conducted with 170 Latino adolescents in the Northeast and Southwest United States...
December 2014: Family Relations
Sigan L Hartley, Iulia Mihaila, Hannah S Otalora-Fadner, Paige M Bussanich
Couples who have a child or adolescent with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are faced with the difficult decision of how to divide childcare responsibilities and paid employment. We examined the division of labor and its relation to parenting stress and marital adjustment in 73 married couples who have a child or adolescent with ASD. Mothers and fathers independently reported on their global level of parenting stress and marital adjustment and then completed a 7-day online daily diary of time spent in childcare, time spent in paid employment, and satisfaction with the time that one's spouse spent in childcare...
December 2014: Family Relations
Scott M Stanley, Galena K Rhoades, Benjamin A Loew, Elizabeth S Allen, Sarah Carter, Laura J Osborne, Donnella Prentice, Howard J Markman
This study examined the effectiveness of an evidence-based, community-delivered adaptation of couple relationship education (CRE; specifically, PREP, The Prevention and Relationship Enhancement Program) delivered at two Army installations. The study is a randomized controlled trial with two years of follow-up, examining marital quality and stability. Sample composition was 662 married couples with a spouse in the U.S. Army. Analyses yielded no evidence of overall enduring intervention effects on relationship quality but couples assigned to intervention at the higher risk site were significantly less likely than controls to be divorced at the two-year follow-up (8...
October 2014: Family Relations
Umadevi Senguttuvan, Shawn D Whiteman, Alexander C Jensen
Family relationships are important predictors of adolescents' diet, physical activity, and health issues including obesity. Despite their prominence in the family, siblings have received little attention on how they may influence these health-related behaviors. Addressing this gap, the present study examined associations between sibling relationship qualities and adolescents' health attitudes, exercise behaviors, and weight controlling for other family relationship qualities. Participants included one parent and two adolescent siblings (ages 12 to 19) from 326 families...
July 1, 2014: Family Relations
Sarah M Kendig, Marybeth J Mattingly, Suzanne M Bianchi
The authors used the Panel Study of Income Dynamics 2007 Transition to Adulthood data in combination with the 2002 Child Development Supplement to examine social class bifurcation in young adulthood. Results indicate that poor youth possibly take on adult roles "too early" at the same time that high-income youth may be supported for a long period past their 18(th) birthday. Although not all evidence is consistent with this bifurcated story, childhood poverty does play a key role. Young adults from poor families establish financial independence early (e...
April 1, 2014: Family Relations
Sarah E Killoren, Andrea L Roach
Using an observational methodology to examine sibling communication, sisters (N = 28 dyads) were videotaped discussing their ideas about dating and sexuality. Social provision theory was used as a framework for the examination of roles enacted by sisters during these conversations. Inductive thematic analytic procedures were conducted and three roles were identified: sisters as confidants, sources of support, and mentors. Older and younger sisters both served as confidants and sources of support for one another, whereas, older sisters were more likely to be mentors for their younger sisters than vice versa...
April 1, 2014: Family Relations
Anne F Farrell, Gloria L Krahn
Disability is part of life for most contemporary families, but to date the literature on disability in families is fragmented and narrow. This editorial commentary introduces the content and findings of peer-reviewed articles appearing in a special issue of Family Relations. The editors outline unanswered but core research questions and preview the themes present in the issue: families with disabilities are diverse; economic hardship disproportionately characterizes their lives; family life with disabilities is a journey that includes stress and resilience, with support contributing significantly to the latter; and that work benefits and taxes family life...
February 2014: Family Relations
Jen D Wong, Marsha R Mailick, Jan S Greenberg, Jinkuk Hong, Christopher L Coe
The effect of daily work stress on the next morning's awakening cortisol level was determined in a sample of 124 mothers (M age = 49.89, SD= 6.33) of adolescents and adults with developmental disabilities and compared to 115 mothers (M age = 46.19, SD = 7.08) of individuals without disabilities. Mothers participated in 8 days of diary telephone interviews and provided saliva samples. Multilevel models revealed that mothers of individuals with developmental disabilities had lower awakening cortisol levels than comparison mothers...
February 2014: Family Relations
Ashlyn L Smith, Maryann Romski, Rose A Sevcik, Lauren B Adamson, R Michael Barker
This study extended research on the Down syndrome advantage by examining differences in parent stress and parent perceptions of language development between 29 parents of young children with Down syndrome and 82 parents of children with other developmental disabilities. Parents of children with Down syndrome reported lower levels of total stress, child-related stress, and stress surrounding the parent-child interaction. Parents of children in both groups reported that they felt successful in their ability to impact their children's communication development but did differ on perceptions of difficulty such that parents of children with Down syndrome perceived their children's communication difficulties as less severe despite the children exhibiting similar language skills...
February 2014: Family Relations
Jieun Song, Marsha R Mailick, Jan S Greenberg
This study examined the effects of work schedule flexibility and the spillover of work stress to family life on the health of parents of adult children with serious mental illness (SMI). We compared 100 parents of adult children with SMI to 500 parents with nondisabled adult children using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. The detrimental impact on health of a lack of work flexibility and of higher levels of negative work-to-family spillover were more pronounced among parents of adult children with SMI than parents with non-disabled adult children...
February 1, 2014: Family Relations
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