Read by QxMD icon Read

Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology

Alyssa S Meuwissen, Michelle M Englund
Given the dearth of research about father-figures' influence on children's cognitive development, we investigated the impact of father support, together with maternal parenting, on children's executive function (EF) in the lab (42 and 54 mo.) and at school (K - 3(rd) grade) in a longitudinal, prospective, at-risk sample (N = 182) using path analysis. Both mother parenting and father-figure support significantly predicted child EF. In the final model, concurrent father-figure support was associated with child EF in both early and middle childhood, and mother parenting in early childhood predicted middle childhood EF...
May 2016: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Kyndra C Cleveland, Jodi A Quas, Thomas D Lyon
Although adverse effects of suggestive interviewing on children's accuracy are well documented, it remains unclear as to whether these effects vary depending on the valence of and the actor implicated in suggestions. In this study, 124 3-8-year-olds participated in a classroom activity and were later questioned about positive and negative false details. The interviewer provided positive reinforcement when children acquiesced to suggestions and negative feedback when they did not. Following reinforcement or feedback, young children were comparably suggestible for positive and negative details...
March 2016: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Michael M Criss, Benjamin J Houltberg, Lixian Cui, Cara D Bosler, Amanda Sheffield Morris, Jennifer S Silk
The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the role of emotion regulation in the link between peer factors and adolescent adjustment difficulties. The sample consisted of 206 adolescents (ages 10-18 years) and parents. Peer factors (i.e., peer antisocial behavior, peer co-rumination, peer emotion regulation) and youth depressive symptoms were based on youth reports. Youth emotion regulation and antisocial behavior were assessed using parent and youth ratings. Results showed that peer antisocial behavior was directly (but not indirectly) related to youth antisocial behavior and depressive symptoms, whereas peer emotion regulation was indirectly (but not directly) related to both adolescent outcomes...
March 2016: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Jill A Rabinowitz, Deborah A G Drabick, Maureen D Reynolds, Duncan B Clark, Thomas M Olino
Temperamental flexibility and lower positive parenting are associated with internalizing and externalizing problems; however, youth varying in flexibility may be differentially affected by positive parenting in the prediction of symptoms. We examined whether children's flexibility moderated prospective relations between maternal and paternal positive parenting and youth internalizing and externalizing symptoms during adolescence. Participants (N =775, 71% male) and their caregivers completed measures when youth were 10-12 and 12-14 years old...
March 2016: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Dana Charles McCoy, Pamela A Morris, Maia C Connors, Celia J Gomez, Hirokazu Yoshikawa
Recent research suggests that Head Start may be differentially effective in improving low-income children's early language and literacy skills based on a number of individual- and family-level characteristics. Using data from the Head Start Impact Study (n = 3503; 50% male, 63% treatment group), the present study extends this work to consider program impact variation based on centers' location in urban versus rural communities. Results indicate that Head Start is more effective in increasing children's receptive vocabulary (as measured by the PPVT) in urban areas and their oral comprehension (as measured by the Woodcock-Johnson Oral Comprehension task) in rural areas...
March 2016: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Maria Serrano-Villar, Esther J Calzada
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2016: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Amy E Root, Maureen Wimsatt, Kenneth H Rubin, Erin D Bigler, Maureen Dennis, Cynthia A Gerhardt, Terry Stancin, H Gerry Taylor, Kathryn Vannatta, Keith O Yeates
Similarities and differences in parenting practices of children (Mage = 10; range 8-13 years) with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and socially-typical controls were examined. In addition, parenting practices were examined as moderators between injury group status (TBI or socially-typical) and social adjustment in the peer group. Mothers completed assessments of parenting practices; children's peers reported about children's social adjustment. The mothers of children with TBI reported significantly lower levels of nurturance and significantly higher levels of restrictiveness than mothers of socially-typical children...
January 2016: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Carla Smith Stover, Yuchun Zhou, Leslie D Leve, Jenae M Neiderhiser, Daniel S Shaw, David Reiss
Parenting beliefs and attributions can influence parenting behavior. We used an adoption design to examine the associations among perinatal risk and poor birth mother health, adoptive parent appraisals of birth mothers' mental health, and genetic attributions to adoptive parents' feelings and behaviors toward their adopted infants. A sample of 361 pairs of adoptive parents and birth mothers were interviewed using standardized measures when infants were between 4 and 9 months old. Adoptive mothers and fathers were observed during play tasks when their infants were 9 months old...
November 2015: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Karen P Kochel, Gary W Ladd, Catherine L Bagwell, Brandon A Yabko
Study aims were to: (1) evaluate the association between bully/victim profiles, derived via latent profile analysis (LPA), and changes in peer acceptance from the fall to spring of 7(th) grade, and (2) investigate the likelihood of friendlessness, and the protective function of mutual friendship, among identified profiles. Participants were 2,587 7(th) graders; peer nomination and rating-scale data were collected in the fall and spring. Four profiles, including bullies, victims, bully-victims, and uninvolved adolescents, were identified at each time point...
November 2015: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
B K Elizabeth Kim, Sabrina Oesterle, Richard F Catalano, J David Hawkins
Understanding the developmental changes in protective factors that lead to healthy youth development provides important information on the appropriate timing and targets for community-based prevention. This study used a control sample of 2,002 individuals from 7 states to examine the normative development of protective factors. Data come from the Community Youth Development Study, a community-randomized trial of Communities That Care. Multilevel models estimated the change in protective factors from 5th to 12th grade, controlling for individual characteristics...
September 2015: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Marcela M Torres, Celene E Domitrovich, Karen L Bierman
Using longitudinal data, this study tested a model in which preschool interpersonal relationships promoted kindergarten achievement in a pathway mediated by growth in emotion knowledge. The sample included 164 children attending Head Start (14% Hispanic-American, 30% African-American, 56% Caucasian; 56% girls). Preschool interpersonal relationships were indexed by student-teacher relationship closeness and positive peer interactions. Two measures of emotion knowledge (identifying emotions in photographs, recognizing emotions in stories) were assessed at the start and end of the preschool year...
July 2015: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Guadalupe Espinoza
The current study examines how Latino adolescents' daily cybervictimization experiences are associated with their emotional and physical well-being and school adjustment. Latino high school students (N = 118) completed daily checklists across five consecutive school days. Hierarchical linear modeling results revealed that daily cybervictimization experiences were associated with greater feelings of distress, anger, shame and physical symptoms. Moderation analyses showed gender differences such that the daily level associations with distress and anger were significant for Latinas but not Latino adolescents...
May 2015: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Sara S Nozadi, Tracy L Spinrad, Nancy Eisenberg, Natalie D Eggum-Wilkens
The mediating and moderating roles of self-regulation in the associations of dispositional anger and fear to later conduct and anxiety symptoms were tested. Mothers and teachers rated children's anger and fear at 54 months (N = 191), and mothers reported on children's symptoms of anxiety and conduct disorders at 72 and 84 months (Ns = 169 and 144). Children's self-regulatory ability was assessed using the Tower of Hanoi task at 72 months. Children's self-regulation mediated the association between early dispositional fear and 84-month mother-reported anxiety disorder symptoms above and beyond the effects of earlier generalized anxiety symptoms...
May 2015: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Hsing-Fang Hsieh, Justin E Heinze, Sophie M Aiyer, Sarah A Stoddard, Jin-Liang Wang, Marc A Zimmerman
We apply a developmental cascade approach to study the longitudinal, cross-domain effects of negative family influence, deviant peer associations, and individual substance use on risky driving among a sample of low-income African American youth. Participants (N = 681) were followed from age 16 to age 21. Using structural equation modeling, we examined conceptual models of pathways to risky driving. Results indicated strong associations between domains within time points among negative family environment, deviant peer associations, individual substance use, and risky driving...
May 2015: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
W Roger Mills-Koonce, Michael T Willoughby, Bharathi Zvara, Melissa Barnett, Hanna Gustafsson, Martha J Cox
This study examines associations between maternal and paternal sensitive parenting and child cognitive development across the first 3 years of life using longitudinal data from 630 families with co-residing biological mothers and fathers. Sensitive parenting was measured by observational coding of parent-child interactions and child cognitive development was assessed with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scales of Intelligence. There were multiple direct and indirect associations between parenting and cognitive development across mothers and fathers, suggesting primary effects, carry-forward effects, spillover effects across parents, and transactional effects across parents and children...
May 2015: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Carissa A Cerda, Myung Hee Im, Jan N Hughes
Using an academically at-risk, ethnically diverse sample of 744 first-grade children, this study tested a multi-method (i.e., child performance measures, teacher ratings, and peer ratings) measurement model of learning-related skills (i.e., effortful control [EC], behavioral self-regulation [BSR], and social competence [SC]), and their shared and unique contributions to children's reading and math achievement, above the effect of demographic variables. The hypothesized correlated factor measurement model demonstrated relatively good fit, with BSR and SC correlated highly with one another and moderately with EC...
September 2014: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Jihyun Sung, Hui-Chin Hsu
Focusing on social pragmatics, this longitudinal study investigated the contribution of mother-toddler collaborative communication to theory of mind (ToM) development at age 4. At age 2½, 78 toddlers' (42 boys) and their mothers were observed during pretend play. At age 4, children were tested using 4 false belief understanding tasks. Both mothers and toddlers engaged in more collaborative (inform, guide/request, and support/confirm) than non-collaborative communication acts. Other-focused collaborative acts of support/confirm by mothers and toddlers predicted children's false belief understanding, even after controlling for 5 covariates...
September 2014: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Anamarie Auger, Stephanie M Reich, Emily K Penner
The impact of a baby book intervention on promoting positive reading beliefs and increasing reading frequency for low-income, new mothers (n = 167) was examined. The Baby Books Project randomly assigned low-income, first-time mothers to one of three study conditions, receiving educational books, non-educational books, or no books, during pregnancy and over the first year of parenthood. Home-based data collection occurred through pregnancy until 18 months post-partum. Mothers who received free baby books had higher beliefs about the importance of reading, the value of having resources to support reading, and the importance of verbal participation during reading...
July 2014: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Christine E Cooper-Vince, Priscilla T Chan, Donna B Pincus, Jonathan S Comer
Intrusive parenting, primarily examined among middle to upper-middle class mothers, has been positively associated with the presence and severity of anxiety in children. This study employed cross-sectional linear regression and longitudinal latent growth curve analyses to evaluate the main and interactive effects of early childhood paternal autonomy restriction (AR) and neighborhood safety (NS) on the trajectory of child anxiety in a sample of 596 community children and fathers from the NICHD SECYD. Longitudinal analyses revealed that greater paternal AR at age 6 was actually associated with greater decreases in child anxiety in later childhood...
July 2014: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Emily C Merz, Susan H Landry, Jeffrey M Williams, Marcia A Barnes, Nancy Eisenberg, Tracy L Spinrad, Carlos Valiente, Michael Assel, Heather B Taylor, Christopher J Lonigan, Beth M Phillips, Jeanine Clancy-Menchetti
This study used a longitudinal design to examine whether effortful control mediated the associations of parental education and home environment quality with preacademic knowledge in toddlers and young preschoolers. The sample consisted of 226 children (2 to 4 years of age at T1) from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds. Parents provided data on parent education and home environment quality. Children completed effortful control, early literacy, and early math assessments. T2 effortful control partially mediated the associations of T1 parental education and T1 home environment quality with T3 emergent literacy after accounting for child age, gender, race/ethnicity, T1 effortful control, and T2 early literacy...
July 2014: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"