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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

T Rene Jamison, Jessica Oeth Schuttler
A majority of social skills research in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and interventions target school age males and no published studies target adolescent females with ASD or related disabilities. Females with ASD are at risk for internalizing symptoms, and experience greater challenges in socialization and communication as social demands become increasingly complex in adolescence. This paper provides a thorough description of a social skills and self-care program designed to address the specific needs of adolescent females with ASD...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Roald A Øien, Logan Hart, Synnve Schjølberg, Carla A Wall, Elizabeth S Kim, Anders Nordahl-Hansen, Martin R Eisemann, Katarzyna Chawarska, Fred R Volkmar, Frederick Shic
Sex differences in typical development can provide context for understanding ASD. Baron-Cohen (Trends Cogn Sci 6(6):248-254, 2002) suggested ASD could be considered an extreme expression of normal male, compared to female, phenotypic profiles. In this paper, sex-specific M-CHAT scores from N = 53,728 18-month-old toddlers, including n = 185 (32 females) with ASD, were examined. Results suggest a nuanced view of the "extreme male brain theory of autism". At an item level, almost every male versus female disadvantage in the broader population was consistent with M-CHAT vulnerabilities in ASD...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Bojana Kuzmanovic, Lionel Rigoux, Kai Vogeley
Previous research has demonstrated irrational asymmetry in belief updating: people tend to take into account good news and neglect bad news. Contradicting formal learning principles, belief updates were on average larger after better-than-expected information than after worse-than-expected information. In the present study, typically developing subjects demonstrated this optimism bias in self-referential judgments. In contrast, adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were significantly less biased when updating self-referential beliefs (each group n = 21, matched for age, gender and IQ)...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Shiny Thomas, Mary E Hovinga, Dheeraj Rai, Brian K Lee
Epilepsy is reported to co-occur in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Previous studies across the world have found prevalence estimates ranging from 4 to 38 %. We examined parent-reported prevalence of co-occurring epilepsy and ASD in the most recent U.S. National Survey of Children's Health, 2011-2012. All analyses accounted for survey weights to account for the complex sampling design. In the overall analytic sample of 85,248 children ages 2-17, there were 1604 children with ASD (prevalence of 1...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Ferhat Yaylaci, Suha Miral
Aim of this study was to compare children diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) according to DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 diagnostic systems. One hundred fifty children aged between 3 and 15 years diagnosed with PDD by DSM-IV-TR were included. PDD symptoms were reviewed through psychiatric assessment based on DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 criteria. Clinical severity was determined using Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) and Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC). A statistically significant decrease (19.3 %) was detected in the diagnostic ratio with DSM-5...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Emily Moulton, Kathryn Bradbury, Marianne Barton, Deborah Fein
The Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), (Schopler et al. in J Autism Dev Disord 10(1):91-103, 1980) is a 15-item observation-based rating scale that yields a total score reflective of autism symptom severity. This study investigated the factor structure of the CARS in a sample of 2-year-old children with DSM-IV-TR (American Psychiatric Association in Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edn. American Psychiatric Publishing, Washington, 2000) diagnoses of AD or PDD-NOS. Following a preliminary internal cross-validation, principal axis factor analysis was completed (N = 282)...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Benjamin E Yerys, Jenelle Nissley-Tsiopinis, Ashley de Marchena, Marley W Watkins, Ligia Antezana, Thomas J Power, Robert T Schultz
Scientists and clinicians regularly use clinical screening tools for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to assess comorbidity without empirical evidence that these measures are valid in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We examined the prevalence of youth meeting ADHD criteria on the ADHD rating scale fourth edition (ADHD-RS-IV), the relationship of ADHD-RS-IV ratings with participant characteristics and behaviors, and its underlying factor structure in 386, 7-17 year olds with ASD without intellectual disability...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
John A Hansen
Assessment of individuals on the autism spectrum often includes a measure of nonverbal IQ. One such measure is the Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices (RSPM). For large research studies with participants distributed nationally it is desirable for assessments to be available online. Because time is a premium, it is ideal that the measure produces accurate scores quickly. The Hansen Research Services Matrix Adaptive Test (HRS-MAT) addresses these needs and with similar psychometric properties of the RSPM. Scores based on the HRS-MAT correlated at r = ...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Agnieszka Butwicka, Niklas Långström, Henrik Larsson, Sebastian Lundström, Eva Serlachius, Catarina Almqvist, Louise Frisén, Paul Lichtenstein
Despite limited and ambiguous empirical data, substance use-related problems have been assumed to be rare among patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Using Swedish population-based registers we identified 26,986 individuals diagnosed with ASD during 1973-2009, and their 96,557 non-ASD relatives. ASD, without diagnosed comorbidity of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or intellectual disability, was related to a doubled risk of substance use-related problems. The risk of substance use-related problems was the highest among individuals with ASD and ADHD...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Daniel Poole, Emma Gowen, Paul A Warren, Ellen Poliakoff
Previous studies have indicated that visual-auditory temporal acuity is reduced in children with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) in comparison to neurotypicals. In the present study we investigated temporal acuity for all possible bimodal pairings of visual, tactile and auditory information in adults with ASC (n = 18) and a matched control group (n = 18). No group differences in temporal acuity for crossmodal stimuli were observed, suggesting that this may be typical in adults with ASC. However, visual-tactile temporal acuity and bias towards vision when presented with visual-auditory information were both predictors of self-reported sensory reactivity...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Claudia L Hilton, Alison Babb-Keeble, Erin Eitzmann Westover, Yi Zhang, Claire Adams, Diane M Collins, Amol Karmarkar, Timothy A Reistetter, John N Constantino
This study examined sensory responsiveness in unaffected siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and associations between sensory responsiveness and social severity. Sensory Profile Caregiver Questionnaires and Social Responsiveness Scales were completed by parents of 185 children between age 4 and 10.95 years. Significant differences were found between participants with ASD and controls, and between participants with ASD and unaffected siblings for all sensory quadrants and domains, but not between controls and unaffected siblings...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Carla A Mazefsky, Taylor N Day, Matthew Siegel, Susan W White, Lan Yu, Paul A Pilkonis
The lack of sensitive measures suitable for use across the range of functioning in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a barrier to treatment development and monitoring. The Emotion Dysregulation Inventory (EDI) is a caregiver-report questionnaire designed to capture emotional distress and problems with emotion regulation in both minimally verbal and verbal individuals. The first two phases of the EDI's development are described, including: (1) utilizing methods from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) project to develop the item pool and response options; and (2) assessment of the EDI in psychiatric inpatients with ASD...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Jorieke Duvekot, Leontine W Ten Hoopen, Geerte Slappendel, Jan van der Ende, Frank C Verhulst, Ad van der Sijde, Kirstin Greaves-Lord
This paper provides an overview of the design and cohort characteristics of the Social Spectrum Study: a clinical cohort study that used a two-phase sampling design to identify children at risk for ASD. After screening 1281 children aged 2.5-10 years who had been consecutively referred to one of six mental health services in the Netherlands, children who screened positive for ASD (n = 428) and a random selection of screen negatives (n = 240) were invited to participate in diagnostic assessments and questionnaires regarding the child, family and society...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Susan Ellis Weismer, Eileen Haebig, Jan Edwards, Jenny Saffran, Courtney E Venker
This study investigated whether vocabulary delays in toddlers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) can be explained by a cognitive style that prioritizes processing of detailed, local features of input over global contextual integration-as claimed by the weak central coherence (WCC) theory. Thirty toddlers with ASD and 30 younger, cognition-matched typical controls participated in a looking-while-listening task that assessed whether perceptual or semantic similarities among named images disrupted word recognition relative to a neutral condition...
October 1, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Eric R Murphy, Megan Norr, John F Strang, Lauren Kenworthy, William D Gaillard, Chandan J Vaidya
We examined spontaneous attention orienting to visual salience in stimuli without social significance using a modified Dot-Probe task during functional magnetic resonance imaging in high-functioning preadolescent children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and age- and IQ-matched control children. While the magnitude of attentional bias (faster response to probes in the location of solid color patch) to visually salient stimuli was similar in the groups, activation differences in frontal and temporoparietal regions suggested hyper-sensitivity to visual salience or to sameness in ASD children...
October 1, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Eilidh Cage, Geoffrey Bird, Elizabeth Pellicano
Being able to manage reputation is an important social skill, but it is unclear whether autistic children can manage reputation. This study investigated whether 33 autistic children matched to 33 typical children could implicitly or explicitly manage reputation. Further, we examined whether cognitive processes-theory of mind, social motivation, inhibitory control and reciprocity-contribute to reputation management. Results showed that neither group implicitly managed reputation, and there was no group difference in explicit reputation management...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
R Royston, P Howlin, J Waite, C Oliver
Individuals with specific genetic syndromes associated with intellectual disability (ID), such as Williams syndrome (WS), are at increased risk for developing anxiety disorders. A systematic literature review identified sixteen WS papers that could generate pooled prevalence estimates of anxiety disorders for WS. A meta-analysis compared these estimates with prevalence estimates for the heterogeneous ID population and the general population. Estimated rates of anxiety disorders in WS were high. WS individuals were four times more likely to experience anxiety than individuals with ID, and the risk was also heightened compared to the general population...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Christian Ryan, Martina Stafford, Robert James King
Faces are one of the most socially significant visual stimuli encountered in the environment, whereas pareidolias are illusions of faces arising from ambiguous stimuli in the environment. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterised by deficits in response to social stimuli. We found that children with ASD (n = 60) identify significantly fewer pareidolic faces in a sequence of ambiguous stimuli than typically developing peers. The two groups did not differ in the number of objects identified, indicating that the children with ASD had a specific lack of attention to faces...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Lauren Bishop-Fitzpatrick, Nancy J Minshew, Carla A Mazefsky, Shaun M Eack
This study examined differences between adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; N = 40) and typical community volunteers (N = 25) on measures of stressful life events, perceived stress, and biological stress response (cardiovascular and cortisol reactivity) during a novel social stress task. Additional analyses examined the relationship between stress and social functioning as measured by the Social Adjustment Scale-II and the Waisman Activities of Daily Living scale. Results indicated that adults with ASD experienced significantly more stressful life events and perceived stress, and greater systolic blood pressure reactivity than typical community volunteers...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Paul A G Forbes, Xueni Pan, Antonia F de C Hamilton
Mimicry involves unconsciously copying the actions of others. Increasing evidence suggests that autistic people can copy the goal of an observed action but show differences in their mimicry. We investigated mimicry in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) within a two-dimensional virtual reality environment. Participants played an imitation game with a socially engaged avatar and socially disengaged avatar. Despite being told only to copy the goal of the observed action, autistic participants and matched neurotypical participants mimicked the kinematics of the avatars' movements...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
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