journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29074336/the-role-of-fenestration-in-management-of-type-i-thoracolumbar-disk-degeneration
#1
REVIEW
Nick D Jeffery, Paul M Freeman
Fenestration offers the advantages of prophylaxis without the need for specialized instrumentation and imaging. Currently there is a lack of equipoise regarding the efficacy of fenestration relative to decompression for treatment of acute canine intervertebral disk herniation; most veterinary spinal surgeons do not consider the 2 procedures equivalently efficacious. Therapeutic fenestration should perhaps be given greater consideration, especially if advanced imaging shows only mild to moderate spinal cord compression or there are restrictions on the duration of surgery, when it might be better to spend the time on fenestration rather than decompression...
October 23, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29074335/choices-and-decisions-in-decompressive-surgery-for-thoracolumbar-intervertebral-disk-herniation
#2
REVIEW
Nick D Jeffery, Tom R Harcourt-Brown, Andrew K Barker, Jonathan M Levine
Once decompressive surgery has been elected, the approach that maximizes the likelihood of gaining access to the herniated material for complete removal should be chosen. In most cases, a procedure that optimizes access to the ventrolateral aspect of the spinal cord will be advantageous but it is important to tailor the details of the surgical procedure to suit individual patients. Decompressive surgery for chronic (type II) herniations will frequently demand a ventral approach with partial corpectomy.
October 23, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29056398/transsphenoidal-surgery-for-pituitary-tumors-and-other-sellar-masses
#3
REVIEW
Tina J Owen, Linda G Martin, Annie V Chen
Transsphenoidal surgery is an option for dogs and cats with functional and nonfunctional pituitary masses or other sellar and parasellar masses. An adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting tumor causing Cushing disease is the most common clinically relevant pituitary tumor in dogs, and the most common pituitary tumor seen in cats is a growth hormone-secreting tumor causing acromegaly. Transsphenoidal surgery can lead to rapid resolution of clinical signs and provide a cure for these patients. Because of the risks associated with this surgery, it should only be attempted by a cohesive pituitary surgery group with a sophisticated medical and surgical team...
October 20, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29056397/an-update-on-cerebrovascular-disease-in-dogs-and-cats
#4
REVIEW
Christen Elizabeth Boudreau
This article reviews definitions and normal anatomy and physiology of canine and feline cerebral vasculature. The pathophysiology of cerebrovascular disease (CVD), which results from disturbance of cerebral blood supply, is described, along with its common causes and correlative findings. The general clinical presentation of companion animals is described, although specific neurologic abnormalities depend on the neuroanatomic location of the disrupted blood supply. Current and future diagnostic approaches are described, including ancillary testing for predisposing factors...
October 20, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29037435/feline-epilepsy
#5
REVIEW
Heidi Barnes Heller
Seizures occur commonly in cats and can be classified as idiopathic epilepsy, structural epilepsy, or reactive seizures. Pursuit of a diagnosis may include a complete blood count, serum biochemistry, brain MRI, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis as indicated. Antiepileptic drugs should be considered if a cat is having frequent seizures, or any 1 seizure longer than 5 minutes. Phenobarbital is often the drug of choice; however, levetiracetam may be more useful for certain types of epilepsy in cats. Long-term prognosis depends on the underlying diagnosis and response to therapy...
October 13, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29037434/clinical-evaluation-of-the-feline-neurologic-patient
#6
REVIEW
Amanda R Taylor, Sharon C Kerwin
Efficient, gentle, and safe handling of cats can result in complete neurologic evaluations and accurate neuroanatomic localizations. The clinic environment should facilitate the examination by providing a quiet and secure environment for the cat. When direct examination of a cat is not possible, the practitioner should fully use indirect methods of examination and video recordings of cat behavior or clinical signs. Direct examination of a cat should proceed in a logical order, where the most useful tests are performed early on in the examination...
October 13, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29037433/minimally-invasive-spine-surgery-in-small-animals
#7
REVIEW
Bianca F Hettlich
Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) seems to have many benefits for human patients and is currently used for various minor and major spine procedures. For MISS, a change in access strategy to the target location is necessary and it requires intraoperative imaging, special instrumentation, and magnification. Few veterinary studies have evaluated MISS for canine patients for spinal decompression procedures. This article discusses the general requirements for MISS and how these can be applied to veterinary spinal surgery...
October 13, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29037432/acupuncture-for-small-animal-neurological-disorders
#8
REVIEW
Patrick Roynard, Lauren Frank, Huisheng Xie, Margaret Fowler
Modern research on traditional Chinese veterinary medicine (TCVM), including herbal medicine and acupuncture, has made evident the role of the nervous system as a cornerstone in many of the mechanisms of action of TCVM. Laboratory models and clinical research available are supportive for the use of TCVM in the management of neurologic conditions in small animals, specifically in cases of intervertebral disk disease, other myelopathies, and painful conditions. This article is meant to help guide the use of TCVM for neurologic disorders in small animals, based on available information and recommendations from experienced TCVM practitioners...
October 13, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28988704/fungal-infections-of-the-central-nervous-system-in-small-animals-clinical-features-diagnosis-and-management
#9
REVIEW
R Timothy Bentley, Amanda R Taylor, Stephanie A Thomovsky
Small animal mycoses vary geographically. Different clinical presentations are seen in animals with infection of the central nervous system (CNS), including multifocal meningoencephalomyelitis, intracranial lesions that accompany sinonasal lesions, rapidly progressive ventriculitis, or solitary granuloma of the brain or spinal cord. Systemic, nasal, or extraneural clinical signs are common but, especially in granuloma cases, do not always occur. Surgery may have a diagnostic and therapeutic role in CNS granuloma...
October 5, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28985897/head-trauma
#10
REVIEW
Kendon W Kuo, Lenore M Bacek, Amanda R Taylor
Head trauma is a common cause of significant morbidity and mortality in dogs and cats. Traumatic brain injury may occur after head trauma. Understanding the pathophysiology of primary and secondary injury after head trauma is essential for management. This article reviews the pathophysiology of head trauma, patient assessment and diagnostics, and treatment recommendations.
October 3, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28964546/three-dimensional-printing-role-in-neurologic-disease
#11
REVIEW
Adrien-Maxence Hespel
Three-dimensional printing has evolved dramatically in recent years and is now available for clinical use. Technical operations of 2 of the most common rapid prototyping processes (stereolithography and fused deposition modeling) and the steps involved in the creation of a prototype are discussed. Current applications in human neurosurgery including presurgical planning and educational opportunities are reviewed before focusing on the current applications in veterinary neurology.
September 27, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28964545/diagnostic-imaging-of-discospondylitis
#12
REVIEW
Catherine M Ruoff, Sharon C Kerwin, Amanda R Taylor
Discospondylitis can affect dogs of any age and breed and may be seen in cats. Although radiography remains the gold standard, advanced imaging, such as CT and MRI, has benefits and likely allows earlier diagnosis and identification of concurrent disease. Because discospondylitis may affect multiple disk spaces, imaging of the entire spine should be considered. There is a lengthening list of causative etiologic agents, and successful treatment hinges on correct identification. Image-guided biopsy should be considered in addition to blood and urine cultures and Brucella canis screening and as an alternative to surgical biopsy in some cases...
September 27, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28964544/acute-herniation-of-nondegenerate-nucleus-pulposus-acute-noncompressive-nucleus-pulposus-extrusion-and-compressive-hydrated-nucleus-pulposus-extrusion
#13
REVIEW
Steven De Decker, Joe Fenn
Acute herniation of nondegenerate nucleus pulposus material is an important and relative common cause of acute spinal cord dysfunction in dogs. Two types of herniation of nondegenerate or hydrated nucleus pulposus have been recognized: acute noncompressive nucleus pulposus extrusion (ANNPE) and acute compressive hydrated nucleus pulposus extrusion (HNPE). Spinal cord contusion plays an important role in the pathophysiology of both conditions. Sustained spinal cord compression is not present in ANNPE, whereas varying degrees of compression are present in HNPE...
September 27, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28967443/advances-in-high-field-mri
#14
REVIEW
Adrien-Maxence Hespel, Robert C Cole
MRI techniques and systems have evolved dramatically over recent years. These advances include higher field strengths, new techniques, faster gradients, improved coil technology, and more robust sequence protocols. This article reviews the most commonly used advanced MRI techniques, including diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetic resonance spectrography, diffusion tensor imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid flow tracking.
September 26, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28964353/wound-management
#15
EDITORIAL
Marije Risselada
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28807399/wound-closure-tension-relieving-techniques-and-local-flaps
#16
REVIEW
Laura C Cuddy
Wounds are often addressed by primary or delayed primary closure. Although many skin wounds could go on to heal by second intention, this results in a less cosmetic outcome, takes longer, and in the long run, is often more expensive. As a general rule, the simplest method of wound closure that is likely to succeed should be chosen. If tension is present at the wound edges, wound dehiscence is likely to occur. Using specific techniques to relieve tension on wound edges and recruiting local flaps from neighboring regions are useful ways to achieve wound closure...
November 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802984/free-grafts-and-microvascular-anastomoses
#17
REVIEW
Valery F Scharf
Skin grafts and free skin flaps are useful options for closure of wounds in which primary closure or use of traditional skin flaps is not feasible. Grafts are classified by their morphology and host-donor relationship. Free skin flaps with microvascular anastomoses are developed from previously described axial pattern flaps and have the added advantage of reestablishing robust vascular supply to the flap, but require specialized equipment and a high degree of technical expertise. Despite intensive perioperative care and the risk of graft or flap failure, skin grafts and free skin flaps can serve as rewarding methods of closing difficult wounds...
November 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802983/systemic-and-local-management-of-burn-wounds
#18
REVIEW
Alessio Vigani, Christine A Culler
Management of severe burn injury (SBI) requires prompt, complex, and aggressive care. Despite major advances in the management of SBI-including patient-targeted resuscitation, management of inhalation injuries, specific nutritional support, enhanced wound therapy, and infection control-the consequences of SBI often result in complex, multiorgan metabolic changes. Consensus guidelines and clinical evidence regarding specific management of small animal burn patients are lacking. This article aims to review updated therapeutic consideration for the systemic and local management of SBI that are proven effective to optimize outcomes in human burn patients and may translate to small animal patients...
November 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28801009/management-of-radiation-side-effects-to-the-skin
#19
REVIEW
Tracy Gieger, Michael Nolan
Radiation therapy (RT) is an essential component for management of many cancers. Veterinary health care professionals must counsel owners about the potential side effects of RT, the anticipated management plan, and associated costs. For most veterinary patients treated with RT, acute radiation side effects are mild; however, careful radiation treatment planning and appropriate management of acute side effects are essential to try to prevent chronic sequelae and the need for ongoing wound care. This article reviews acute and late side effects to the skin and their management...
November 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28797554/axial-pattern-flaps
#20
REVIEW
Kelley Thieman Mankin
Axial pattern flaps are based on a direct cutaneous artery and vein supplying a segment of skin. They provide a large, robust option for large wound closure. Many different axial pattern flaps have been described to provide options for closure of wounds located from the nose to the tail. All axial pattern flaps require good surgical technique and careful attention to detail while developing of the flap.
November 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
journal
journal
27506
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"