journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28651809/interventional-cardiology-what-s-new
#1
REVIEW
Brian A Scansen
Interventional cardiology in veterinary medicine continues to expand beyond the standard 3 procedures of patent ductus arteriosus occlusion, balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty, and transvenous pacing. Opportunities for fellowship training; advances in equipment, including high-resolution digital fluoroscopy, real-time 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography, fusion imaging, and rotational angiography; ultrasound-guided access and vascular closure devices; and refinement of techniques, including cutting and high-pressure ballooning, intracardiac and intravascular stent implantation, septal defect occlusion, transcatheter valve implantation, and hybrid approaches, are likely to transform the field over the next decade...
June 23, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28647114/status-of-therapeutic-gene-transfer-to-treat-cardiovascular-disease-in-dogs-and-cats
#2
REVIEW
Meg M Sleeper
Gene therapy is a procedure resulting in the transfer of a gene into an individual's cells to treat a disease. One goal of gene transfer is to express a functional gene when the endogenous gene is inactive. However, because heart failure is a complex disease characterized by multiple abnormalities at the cellular level, an alternate gene delivery approach is to alter myocardial protein levels to improve function. This article discusses background information on gene delivery including packaging, administration, and a brief discussion of some of the candidate transgenes likely to alter the progression of naturally occurring heart disease in dogs and cats...
June 21, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28647113/feline-congestive-heart-failure-current-diagnosis-and-management
#3
REVIEW
Etienne Côté
Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a well-known disorder in feline practice, having been recognized as the most common clinical syndrome in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, for example. This article identifies the reasons that an accurate diagnosis of CHF is important and the means by which to obtain one; pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic methods for controlling signs of CHF; and recommendations for follow-up evaluations, monitoring, and troubleshooting.
June 21, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28647112/arrhythmogenic-right-ventricular-cardiomyopathy-in-the-boxer-dog-an-update
#4
REVIEW
Kathryn M Meurs
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is an inheritable form of myocardial disease characterized most commonly by ventricular tachycardias, syncope, and sometimes systolic dysfunction and heart failure. A genetic mutation in the striatin gene has been identified in many affected dogs. Dogs with only one copy of the mutation (heterozygous) have a variable prognosis with many dogs remaining asymptomatic or successfully managed on antiarrhythmic drugs for years. Dogs that are homozygous for the mutation seem to have a worse prognosis...
June 21, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28647111/right-ventricular-function-imaging-techniques
#5
REVIEW
Lance C Visser
Functional assessment of the right ventricle (RV) is challenging and has been understudied compared with the left ventricle. However, advances in echocardiographic assessment of RV function permit the quantitative assessment of RV performance via numerous modalities. Many RV function indices have now been studied in large samples of healthy dogs, and studies suggest a clinical benefit to echocardiographic RV function assessment in dogs and cats. This article reviews relevant RV anatomy and physiology, and highlights numerous indices of RV function assessment for dogs and cats...
June 21, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28645513/atrial-fibrillation-current-therapies
#6
REVIEW
Romain Pariaut
A rate control or a rhythm control strategy can be applied to the management of atrial fibrillation. Rate control of atrial fibrillation consists of decreasing the ventricular response rate by limiting the number of supraventricular impulses that can travel through the atrioventricular node. The goal of decreasing heart rate in dogs with atrial fibrillation is usually achieved with a combination of the calcium channel blocker diltiazem and digoxin. Rhythm control of atrial fibrillation encompasses pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic methods to terminate the arrhythmia and restore sinus rhythm...
June 20, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576276/hip-dysplasia-where-are-we-now-and-how-do-we-treat
#7
EDITORIAL
Tisha A M Harper, J Ryan Butler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576275/innoplant-total-hip-replacement-system
#8
REVIEW
Tisha A M Harper
Total hip replacement is a salvage procedure that is done to alleviate discomfort secondary to osteoarthritis in the hip, which is most often a result of hip dysplasia. Commercially available total hip replacement implants for small animal patients are classified as cemented or cementless. The INNOPLANT Total Hip Replacement system includes modular, screw-in cementless components that were developed to improve implant stability by maintaining as much normal anatomic structure, and by extension biomechanics of the coxofemoral joint, as possible...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576274/biomedtrix-total-hip-replacement-systems-an-overview
#9
REVIEW
Teresa D Schiller
Total hip replacement for canine and feline patients affected by degenerative, traumatic, and vascular injury of the coxofemoral joint has become a highly successful orthopedic procedure. The highly effective BioMedtrix total hip replacement systems use cemented and cementless implants with unique design features to address a variety of bone conditions and surgeon expertise and preferences. There are pros and cons for both systems with common and unique complications that can occur in either system. Surgeon experience and adherence to the principles of technique will strongly influence the complication rate and outcomes...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576273/femoral-head-and-neck-excision
#10
REVIEW
Tisha A M Harper
Femoral head and neck excision is a surgical procedure that is commonly performed in small animal patients. It is a salvage procedure that is done to relieve pain in the coxofemoral joint and restore acceptable function of the limb. Femoral head and neck excision is most commonly used to treat severe osteoarthritis in the coxofemoral joint and can be done in dogs and cats of any size or age. The procedure should not be overused and ideally should not be done when the integrity of the coxofemoral joint can be restored...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576272/juvenile-pubic-symphysiodesis
#11
REVIEW
Kathleen A Linn
In properly selected dogs, juvenile pubic symphysiodesis improves joint congruity, decreases hip laxity, and can reverse or prevent progression of degenerative joint disease in the hips. To be effective, surgery must be done at a young age and in hips that are only mildly to moderately lax. Juvenile pubic symphysiodesis is best viewed more as a preemptive procedure than as a strictly therapeutic one. Dogs considered to be at risk for hip dysplasia should be screened with Ortolani testing at 12 weeks of age, with further imaging and perhaps surgery to follow for those who have a positive Ortolani sign...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576271/physical-rehabilitation-for-the-management-of-canine-hip-dysplasia
#12
REVIEW
David L Dycus, David Levine, Denis J Marcellin-Little
Hip dysplasia is among the most common orthopedic conditions affecting dogs. Joint laxity is responsible for abnormal development of the femoral head and acetabulum, leading to excessive wear of the articular cartilage. Wear leads to secondary osteoarthritis. Rehabilitation is either conservative or after surgical management. Conservative rehabilitation therapies are directed at decreasing pain, improving hip range of motion (ROM), and building or maintaining muscle mass. Postoperatively, rehabilitation focuses on decreasing postoperative pain and inflammation, improving comfort and limb use, and protecting the surgical site...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576270/conservative-management-of-hip-dysplasia
#13
REVIEW
Tisha A M Harper
Hip dysplasia (HD) is a common orthopedic condition seen in small animal patients that leads to osteoarthritis of the coxofemoral joint. The disease can be managed conservatively or surgically. The goals of surgical treatment in the immature patient are to either prevent the clinical signs of HD or to prevent or slow the progression of osteoarthritis. In mature patients surgery is used as a salvage procedure to treat debilitating osteoarthritis. Conservative management can be used in dogs with mild or intermittent clinical signs and includes nutritional management and weight control, exercise modification, physical rehabilitation, pain management and disease-modifying agents...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576269/canine-hip-dysplasia-diagnostic-imaging
#14
REVIEW
J Ryan Butler, Jennifer Gambino
Diagnostic imaging is the principal method used to screen for and diagnose hip dysplasia in the canine patient. Multiple techniques are available, each having advantages, disadvantages, and limitations. Hip-extended radiography is the most used method and is best used as a screening tool and for assessment for osteoarthritis. Distraction radiographic methods such as the PennHip method allow for improved detection of laxity and improved ability to predict future osteoarthritis development. More advanced techniques such as MRI, although expensive and not widely available, may improve patient screening and allow for improved assessment of cartilage health...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28460694/etiopathogenesis-of-canine-hip-dysplasia-prevalence-and-genetics
#15
REVIEW
Michael D King
First identified in 1935, canine hip dysplasia is thought to be the most common orthopedic condition diagnosed in the dog. It is most prevalent in large and giant breed dogs, with a complex polygenic mode of inheritance, and relatively low heritability. External factors including caloric intake when growing have a significant effect on phenotypic expression. Initial joint laxity progresses to osteoarthritis due to subluxation and abnormal wearing. Selective breeding programs to attempt to decrease prevalence have shown modest results so far...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28460693/triple-pelvic-osteotomy-and-double-pelvic-osteotomy
#16
REVIEW
Francisco Guevara, Samuel P Franklin
Triple and double pelvic osteotomy (TPO, DPO) are performed with the goal of increasing acetabular ventro-version, increasing femoral head coverage, and decreasing femoral head subluxation. Since the first descriptions of TPO, there have been modifications in technique, most notably omission of the ischial osteotomy for DPO, and improvements in the implants, including availability of locking TPO/DPO bone plates. Associated complication rates seem to have declined accordingly. The most salient questions regarding these procedures remain what selection criteria should be used to identify candidates and whether halting or preventing osteoarthritis is necessary to consider these surgeries clinically beneficial...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28442161/zurich-cementless-total-hip-replacement
#17
REVIEW
David Hummel
Total hip replacement (THR) is the gold standard treatment of intractable pain from hip dysplasia. THR procedures are divided into 2 main categories: cemented and cementless, with hybrid a combination. The Zurich Cementless THR system uses a combination of press-fit (acetabular component) and locking screw (femoral component) fixation designed to address the main challenge facing cemented systems (aseptic loosening) while providing the benefit of immediate stability with its novel locking screw implantation system for the femoral stem...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434528/canine-hip-dysplasia-screening-within-the-united-states-pennsylvania-hip-improvement-program-and-orthopedic-foundation-for-animals-hip-elbow-database
#18
REVIEW
Jennifer K Reagan
Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) is a complex, polygenic disease radiographically associated with hip subluxation and development of osteoarthritis. Screening programs have been established with the goal of hip improvement, with the most common in the United States being OFA hip scoring and the PennHIP method. When evaluating the single hip-extended view used by OFA versus the 3 radiographic views and associated distraction index (DI) used by PennHIP for CHD screening, the scientific evidence supports the use of the DI and PennHIP method...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28389035/hip-dysplasia-clinical-signs-and-physical-examination-findings
#19
REVIEW
Jason Syrcle
Hip dysplasia is a common developmental disorder of the dog, consisting of varying degrees of hip laxity, progressive remodeling of the structures of the hip, and subsequent development of osteoarthritis. It is a juvenile-onset condition, with clinical signs often first evident at 4 to 12 months of age. A tentative diagnosis of hip dysplasia can be made based on signalment, history, and physical examination findings. The Ortolani test is a valuable tool for identifying juvenile dogs affected with this condition...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28108035/feline-hepatic-lipidosis
#20
REVIEW
Chiara Valtolina, Robert P Favier
Feline hepatic lipidosis (FHL) is a common and potentially fatal liver disorder. Although the pathophysiologic mechanisms of FHL remain elusive, there is an imbalance between the influx of fatty acids from peripheral fat stores into the liver, de novo liposynthesis, and the rate of hepatic oxidation and dispersal of hepatic TAG via excretion of very-low density lipoproteins. The diagnosis of FHL is based on anamnestic, clinical, and clinicopathologic findings, associated with diagnostic imaging of the liver, and cytology, or histological examination of liver biopsies...
May 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
journal
journal
27506
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"