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Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28807399/wound-closure-tension-relieving-techniques-and-local-flaps
#1
REVIEW
Laura C Cuddy
Wounds are often addressed by primary or delayed primary closure. Although many skin wounds could go on to heal by second intention, this results in a less cosmetic outcome, takes longer, and in the long run, is often more expensive. As a general rule, the simplest method of wound closure that is likely to succeed should be chosen. If tension is present at the wound edges, wound dehiscence is likely to occur. Using specific techniques to relieve tension on wound edges and recruiting local flaps from neighboring regions are useful ways to achieve wound closure...
August 11, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802984/free-grafts-and-microvascular-anastomoses
#2
REVIEW
Valery F Scharf
Skin grafts and free skin flaps are useful options for closure of wounds in which primary closure or use of traditional skin flaps is not feasible. Grafts are classified by their morphology and host-donor relationship. Free skin flaps with microvascular anastomoses are developed from previously described axial pattern flaps and have the added advantage of reestablishing robust vascular supply to the flap, but require specialized equipment and a high degree of technical expertise. Despite intensive perioperative care and the risk of graft or flap failure, skin grafts and free skin flaps can serve as rewarding methods of closing difficult wounds...
August 9, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802983/systemic-and-local-management-of-burn-wounds
#3
REVIEW
Alessio Vigani, Christine A Culler
Management of severe burn injury (SBI) requires prompt, complex, and aggressive care. Despite major advances in the management of SBI-including patient-targeted resuscitation, management of inhalation injuries, specific nutritional support, enhanced wound therapy, and infection control-the consequences of SBI often result in complex, multiorgan metabolic changes. Consensus guidelines and clinical evidence regarding specific management of small animal burn patients are lacking. This article aims to review updated therapeutic consideration for the systemic and local management of SBI that are proven effective to optimize outcomes in human burn patients and may translate to small animal patients...
August 9, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28801009/management-of-radiation-side-effects-to-the-skin
#4
REVIEW
Tracy Gieger, Michael Nolan
Radiation therapy (RT) is an essential component for management of many cancers. Veterinary health care professionals must counsel owners about the potential side effects of RT, the anticipated management plan, and associated costs. For most veterinary patients treated with RT, acute radiation side effects are mild; however, careful radiation treatment planning and appropriate management of acute side effects are essential to try to prevent chronic sequelae and the need for ongoing wound care. This article reviews acute and late side effects to the skin and their management...
August 9, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28797554/axial-pattern-flaps
#5
REVIEW
Kelley Thieman Mankin
Axial pattern flaps are based on a direct cutaneous artery and vein supplying a segment of skin. They provide a large, robust option for large wound closure. Many different axial pattern flaps have been described to provide options for closure of wounds located from the nose to the tail. All axial pattern flaps require good surgical technique and careful attention to detail while developing of the flap.
August 7, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28797553/negative-pressure-wound-therapy
#6
REVIEW
Bryden J Stanley
Open wounds are regularly addressed in veterinary medicine and can be challenging to manage, especially when there is significant loss of full-thickness skin. Traditional wound dressings are being replaced by modern synthetic materials, biologic wound dressings, and mechanical technologies to augment healing. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is one of the most successful mechanical adjuncts to wound healing. Experience with NPWT in veterinary medicine is not as extensive as in human medicine but reports have been positive...
August 7, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28797552/perforating-cervical-thoracic-and-abdominal-wounds
#7
REVIEW
Marije Risselada
Most body wall injuries in small animals are caused by bite wounds or vehicular trauma. Penetrating gunshot wounds are less common. Bite wounds are characterized by massive trauma to the body wall with associated defects, but fewer internal injuries, whereas gunshot wounds are associated with a high number of internal injuries. Vehicular accident injuries are caused by blunt force trauma and can lead to both body wall defects and internal organ damage. Impalement injuries are rare and are typically associated with internal damage...
August 7, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28781059/debridement-techniques-and-non-negative-pressure-wound-therapy-wound-management
#8
REVIEW
Elizabeth Thompson
The importance of initial wound classification and daily reevaluation of wound stage cannot be understated. Products available to enhance healing are categorized based on the stage of wound healing to which they exert their effects. After patient stability has been verified, thorough debridement is critical in order to create an environment conducive for healing. The wound environment of acute and chronic wounds differs greatly, often requiring different management approaches.
August 4, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28781058/initial-management-of-traumatic-wounds
#9
REVIEW
Nausikaa Devriendt, Hilde de Rooster
When traumatic wounds are quickly and accurately treated, morbidity and costs can be significantly decreased. Several factors, such as time delay between injury and treatment, the degree of contamination, extension and depth of the wound, and the mechanism of injury, influence the treatment and prognosis and stress the importance of a patient-specific approach. Although all traumatic wounds are contaminated, antibiotic therapy is seldom required if correct wound management is installed.
August 4, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28669433/asymptomatic-canine-degenerative-valve-disease-current-and-future-therapies
#10
REVIEW
Sonya G Gordon, Ashley B Saunders, Sonya R Wesselowski
Degenerative valve disease (DVD) is the leading cause of heart disease and congestive heart failure (CHF) in the dog. The first published consensus statement provided guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of DVD. Although treatment was not recommended in stage B1 DVD, consensus was not reached regarding evidence-based recommendations for treatment of stage B2 DVD. This article addresses the impact of new evidence on historical recommendations for stage B DVD, and gives the reader a glimpse into possible future therapies...
June 29, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28669432/cardiorenal-syndrome-diagnosis-and-management
#11
REVIEW
João S Orvalho, Larry D Cowgill
Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) has not been well characterized in veterinary medicine, yet an accurate appreciation of the kidney and the cardiovascular system and their interactions may have practical clinical implications. A consensus for cardiovascular-renal axis disorders of dogs and cats was recently attempted. The outcome of patients with CRS is likely to improve with the increasing awareness and ability to identify and understand the pathophysiologic characteristics of CRS. The utilization of existing and emerging organ-specific biomarkers with greater sensitivities than conventional diagnostics forecast new opportunities to diagnose and manage cardiac disease...
June 29, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28662873/asymptomatic-hypertrophic-cardiomyopathy-diagnosis-and-therapy
#12
REVIEW
Virginia Luis Fuentes, Lois J Wilkie
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) affects 15% of cats, and prevalence increases with age. Although many cats with HCM will have normal life expectancy, some cats die suddenly or will develop congestive heart failure or arterial thromboembolism (ATE). High-risk cats can be recognized by left atrial enlargement on echocardiography, which can be missed on physical examination as a heart murmur is often absent. Alternatively, plasma biomarkers can be measured as an initial screening test; echocardiography is indicated in cats with plasma NT-probrain natriuretic peptide concentrations exceeding 100 pmol/L...
June 27, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28662872/feline-cardiogenic-arterial-thromboembolism-prevention-and-therapy
#13
REVIEW
Daniel F Hogan
Feline cardiogenic arterial thromboembolism (CATE) is a devastating disease where 33% of cats survive their initial event although approximately 50% of mortality is from euthanasia. Acute management focuses on inducing a hypocoagulable state, improving blood flow, and providing supportive care. Ideally, all cats should be given 72 hours of treatment to determine acute clinical course. Preventative protocols include antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant drugs with the only prospective clinical trial demonstrating that clopidogrel is superior to aspirin with lower CATE recurrence rate and longer time to recurrent CATE...
June 27, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28778344/conversations-in-veterinary-cardiology
#14
EDITORIAL
João S Orvalho
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28669434/real-time-three-dimensional-echocardiography-from-diagnosis-to-intervention
#15
REVIEW
João S Orvalho
Echocardiography is one of the most important diagnostic tools in veterinary cardiology, and one of the greatest recent developments is real-time three-dimensional imaging. Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography is a new ultrasonography modality that provides comprehensive views of the cardiac valves and congenital heart defects. The main advantages of this technique, particularly real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography, are the ability to visualize the catheters, and balloons or other devices, and the ability to image the structure that is undergoing intervention with unprecedented quality...
September 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28647111/right-ventricular-function-imaging-techniques
#16
REVIEW
Lance C Visser
Functional assessment of the right ventricle (RV) is challenging and has been understudied compared with the left ventricle. However, advances in echocardiographic assessment of RV function permit the quantitative assessment of RV performance via numerous modalities. Many RV function indices have now been studied in large samples of healthy dogs, and studies suggest a clinical benefit to echocardiographic RV function assessment in dogs and cats. This article reviews relevant RV anatomy and physiology and highlights numerous indices of RV function assessment for dogs and cats...
September 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576276/hip-dysplasia-where-are-we-now-and-how-do-we-treat
#17
EDITORIAL
Tisha A M Harper, J Ryan Butler
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576275/innoplant-total-hip-replacement-system
#18
REVIEW
Tisha A M Harper
Total hip replacement is a salvage procedure that is done to alleviate discomfort secondary to osteoarthritis in the hip, which is most often a result of hip dysplasia. Commercially available total hip replacement implants for small animal patients are classified as cemented or cementless. The INNOPLANT Total Hip Replacement system includes modular, screw-in cementless components that were developed to improve implant stability by maintaining as much normal anatomic structure, and by extension biomechanics of the coxofemoral joint, as possible...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576274/biomedtrix-total-hip-replacement-systems-an-overview
#19
REVIEW
Teresa D Schiller
Total hip replacement for canine and feline patients affected by degenerative, traumatic, and vascular injury of the coxofemoral joint has become a highly successful orthopedic procedure. The highly effective BioMedtrix total hip replacement systems use cemented and cementless implants with unique design features to address a variety of bone conditions and surgeon expertise and preferences. There are pros and cons for both systems with common and unique complications that can occur in either system. Surgeon experience and adherence to the principles of technique will strongly influence the complication rate and outcomes...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576273/femoral-head-and-neck-excision
#20
REVIEW
Tisha A M Harper
Femoral head and neck excision is a surgical procedure that is commonly performed in small animal patients. It is a salvage procedure that is done to relieve pain in the coxofemoral joint and restore acceptable function of the limb. Femoral head and neck excision is most commonly used to treat severe osteoarthritis in the coxofemoral joint and can be done in dogs and cats of any size or age. The procedure should not be overused and ideally should not be done when the integrity of the coxofemoral joint can be restored...
July 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice
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