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Trends in Neurosciences

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318543/obesity-induced-neuroinflammation-beyond-the-hypothalamus
#1
REVIEW
Owein Guillemot-Legris, Giulio G Muccioli
Obesity is now a worldwide health issue. Far from being limited to weight gain, obesity is generally associated with low-grade inflammation and with a cluster of disorders collectively known as the 'metabolic syndrome'. When considering obesity and the subsequent neuroinflammation, the focus was long set on the hypothalamus. More recently, obesity-derived neuroinflammation has been shown to affect other brain structures such as the hippocampus, cortex, brainstem, or amygdala. Furthermore, obesity has been associated with increased occurrence of central disorders such as depression and impaired cognitive function...
March 16, 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318542/monoamine-transporters-as-ionotropic-receptors
#2
Louis J De Felice
It is well established that glutamate and GABA signal through both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Conversely, it is thought that, with one exception, monoamines (dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine) signal via metabotropic receptors. Given their capacity to generate fast-acting currents, I suggest that the monoamine transporters should be considered as ionotropic receptors.
March 16, 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314446/the-insula-an-underestimated-brain-area-in-clinical-neuroscience-psychiatry-and-neurology
#3
REVIEW
Ho Namkung, Sun-Hong Kim, Akira Sawa
Supported by recent human neuroimaging studies, the insula is re-emerging as an important brain area not only in the physiological understanding of the brain, but also in pathological contexts in clinical research. In this opinion article, we briefly introduce the anatomical and histological features of the human insula. We then summarize the physiological functions of the insula and underscore its pathological roles in psychiatric and neurological disorders that have long been underestimated. We finally propose possible strategies through which the role of the insula may be further understood for both basic and clinical neuroscience...
March 14, 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314445/where-does-eeg-come-from-and-what-does-it-mean
#4
REVIEW
Michael X Cohen
Electroencephalography (EEG) has been instrumental in making discoveries about cognition, brain function, and dysfunction. However, where do EEG signals come from and what do they mean? The purpose of this paper is to argue that we know shockingly little about the answer to this question, to highlight what we do know, how important the answers are, and how modern neuroscience technologies that allow us to measure and manipulate neural circuits with high spatiotemporal accuracy might finally bring us some answers...
March 14, 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28274488/the-neuroethological-paradox-of-animal-consciousness
#5
Yoram Gutfreund
The more advanced our understanding of the brain of an animal is, the less likely that this animal is a conscious being. This provocative logical paradox is explained and analyzed, leading to the conclusion that to advance understanding of animal consciousness it is necessary to resolve first how our consciousness is produced by our brain.
March 5, 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28162799/cannabidiol-swinging-the-marijuana-pendulum-from-weed-to-medication-to-treat-the-opioid-epidemic
#6
Yasmin L Hurd
Epidemics require a paradigm shift in thinking about all possible solutions. The rapidly changing sociopolitical marijuana landscape provides a foundation for the therapeutic development of medicinal cannabidiol to address the current opioid abuse crisis.
February 2, 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28126248/shaping-science-for-increasing-interdependence-and-specialization
#7
Christian Utzerath, Guillén Fernández
Like art, science affords an individualistic career. However, increasingly, complexity necessitates increased interdependency and specialization. Despite this change, many institutions, funding agencies, and publishers insist on an exclusively individualistic model of science. This hinders scientific progress by imposing a range of inefficiencies in the planning and execution of research plans.
January 23, 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28110935/a-glud-coming-of-age-story
#8
REVIEW
Michisuke Yuzaki, A Radu Aricescu
The GluD1 and GluD2 receptors form the GluD ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) subfamily. Without known endogenous ligands, they have long been referred to as 'orphan' and remained enigmatic functionally. Recent progress has, however, radically changed this view. Both GluD receptors are expressed in wider brain regions than originally thought. Human genetic studies and analyses of knockout mice have revealed their involvement in multiple neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. The discovery of endogenous ligands, together with structural investigations, has opened the way towards a mechanistic understanding of GluD signaling at central nervous system synapses...
January 19, 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28108113/current-understanding-of-the-hypothalamic-ghrelin-pathways-inducing-appetite-and-adiposity
#9
REVIEW
Omar Al Massadi, Miguel López, Matthias Tschöp, Carlos Diéguez, Ruben Nogueiras
Ghrelin is a multifaceted regulator of metabolism. Ghrelin regulates energy balance in the short term via induction of appetite and in the long term via increased body weight and adiposity. Recently, several central pathways modulating the metabolic actions of ghrelin were unmasked, and it was shown to act through different hypothalamic nuclei to induce feeding. Ghrelin also modulates glucose homeostasis, but the central mechanisms responsible for this action have not been studied in detail. Although ghrelin also acts through extrahypothalamic areas to promote feeding, this review specifically dissects hypothalamic control of ghrelin's orexigenic and adipogenic actions and presents current understanding of the intracellular ghrelin orexigenic pathways, including their dependence on other relevant systems implicated in energy balance...
January 17, 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28081942/pten-local-and-global-modulation-of-neuronal-function-in-health-and-disease
#10
REVIEW
Shira Knafo, José A Esteban
Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) was recently revealed to be a synaptic player during plasticity events in addition to its well-established role as a general controlling factor in cell proliferation and neuronal growth during development. Alterations of these direct actions of PTEN at synapses may lead to synaptic dysfunction with behavioral and cognitive consequences. A recent paradigmatic example of this situation, Alzheimer's disease (AD), is associated with excessive recruitment of PTEN into synapses leading to pathological synaptic depression...
January 9, 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28063612/conserved-sequence-processing-in-primate-frontal-cortex
#11
REVIEW
Benjamin Wilson, William D Marslen-Wilson, Christopher I Petkov
An important aspect of animal perception and cognition is learning to recognize relationships between environmental events that predict others in time, a form of relational knowledge that can be assessed using sequence-learning paradigms. Humans are exquisitely sensitive to sequencing relationships, and their combinatorial capacities, most saliently in the domain of language, are unparalleled. Recent comparative research in human and nonhuman primates has obtained behavioral and neuroimaging evidence for evolutionarily conserved substrates involved in sequence processing...
January 4, 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129895/the-neurobiology-of-postpartum-anxiety-and-depression
#12
REVIEW
Jodi L Pawluski, Joseph S Lonstein, Alison S Fleming
Ten to twenty percent of postpartum women experience anxiety or depressive disorders, which can have detrimental effects on the mother, child, and family. Little is known about the neural correlates of these affective disorders when they occur in mothers, but they do have unique neural profiles during the postpartum period compared with when they occur at other times in a woman's life. Given that the neural systems affected by postpartum anxiety and depression overlap and interact with the systems involved in maternal caregiving behaviors, mother-infant interactions are highly susceptible to disruption...
December 28, 2016: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28190529/mitophagy-and-alzheimer-s-disease-cellular-and-molecular-mechanisms
#13
REVIEW
Jesse S Kerr, Bryan A Adriaanse, Nigel H Greig, Mark P Mattson, M Zameel Cader, Vilhelm A Bohr, Evandro F Fang
Neurons affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) experience mitochondrial dysfunction and a bioenergetic deficit that occurs early and promotes the disease-defining amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and Tau pathologies. Emerging findings suggest that the autophagy/lysosome pathway that removes damaged mitochondria (mitophagy) is also compromised in AD, resulting in the accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria. Results in animal and cellular models of AD and in patients with sporadic late-onset AD suggest that impaired mitophagy contributes to synaptic dysfunction and cognitive deficits by triggering Aβ and Tau accumulation through increases in oxidative damage and cellular energy deficits; these, in turn, impair mitophagy...
March 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28187950/advancing-nmda-receptor-physiology-by-integrating-multiple-approaches
#14
REVIEW
Huan-Xiang Zhou, Lonnie P Wollmuth
NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are ion channels activated by the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and are essential to all aspects of brain function, including learning and memory formation. Missense mutations distributed throughout NMDAR subunits have been associated with an array of neurological disorders. Recent structural, functional, and computational studies have generated many insights into the activation process connecting glutamate binding to ion-channel opening, which is central to NMDAR physiology and pathophysiology...
March 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28012708/secondary-motor-cortex-where-sensory-meets-motor-in-the-rodent-frontal-cortex
#15
REVIEW
Florent Barthas, Alex C Kwan
In rodents, the medial aspect of the secondary motor cortex (M2) is known by other names, including medial agranular cortex (AGm), medial precentral cortex (PrCm), and frontal orienting field (FOF). As a subdivision of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), M2 can be defined by a distinct set of afferent and efferent connections, microstimulation responses, and lesion outcomes. However, the behavioral role of M2 remains mysterious. Here, we focus on evidence from rodent studies, highlighting recent findings of early and context-dependent choice-related activity in M2 during voluntary behavior...
March 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28104285/resisting-the-urge-to-act-dreadds-modifying-habits
#16
Mark A G Eldridge, Barry J Richmond
Recently, Meyer and Bucci used chemogenetic technology - artificial excitatory and inhibitory receptors - to modulate neuronal activity in two connected brain regions in opposite directions simultaneously. This innovative manipulation revealed that the two regions studied, orbitofrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens, are not sequentially dependent during contextual decision-making.
February 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28041634/weighing-the-evidence-in-peters-rule-does-neuronal-morphology-predict-connectivity
#17
REVIEW
Christopher L Rees, Keivan Moradi, Giorgio A Ascoli
Although the importance of network connectivity is increasingly recognized, identifying synapses remains challenging relative to the routine characterization of neuronal morphology. Thus, researchers frequently employ axon-dendrite colocations as proxies of potential connections. This putative equivalence, commonly referred to as Peters' rule, has been recently studied at multiple levels and scales, fueling passionate debates regarding its validity. Our critical literature review identifies three conceptually distinct but often confused applications: inferring neuron type circuitry, predicting synaptic contacts among individual cells, and estimating synapse numbers within neuron pairs...
February 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28041633/back-to-the-basics-cnidarians-start-to-fire
#18
REVIEW
Thomas C G Bosch, Alexander Klimovich, Tomislav Domazet-Lošo, Stefan Gründer, Thomas W Holstein, Gáspár Jékely, David J Miller, Andrea P Murillo-Rincon, Fabian Rentzsch, Gemma S Richards, Katja Schröder, Ulrich Technau, Rafael Yuste
The nervous systems of cnidarians, pre-bilaterian animals that diverged close to the base of the metazoan radiation, are structurally simple and thus have great potential to reveal fundamental principles of neural circuits. Unfortunately, cnidarians have thus far been relatively intractable to electrophysiological and genetic techniques and consequently have been largely passed over by neurobiologists. However, recent advances in molecular and imaging methods are fueling a renaissance of interest in and research into cnidarians nervous systems...
February 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28038829/tooth-matrix-biomarkers-to-reconstruct-critical-periods-of-brain-plasticity
#19
Hirofumi Morishita, Manish Arora
Developmental brain plasticity involves complex, time-dependent dynamic molecular interactions that cannot be observed directly in humans. We propose that the shared evolutionary homology of teeth and the neurosensory system, and the archival nature of dentine microstructure, allows the development of 'biologic hard drives' that can characterize perinatal temporal dynamics in neuroplasticity.
January 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27986294/monitoring-demands-for-executive-control-shared-functions-between-human-and-nonhuman-primates
#20
REVIEW
Farshad A Mansouri, Tobias Egner, Mark J Buckley
Fifteen years ago, an influential model proposed that the human dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) detects conflict and induces adaptive control of behavior. Over the years support for this model has been mixed, in particular due to divergent findings in human versus nonhuman primates. We here review recent findings that suggest greater commonalities across species. These include equivalent behavioral consequences of conflict and similar neuronal signals in the dACC, but also a common failure of dACC lesions to reliably abolish conflict-driven behavior...
January 2017: Trends in Neurosciences
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