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Journal of Behavioral Medicine

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28337560/medical-mistrust-as-a-key-mediator-in-the-association-between-perceived-discrimination-and-adherence-to-antiretroviral-therapy-among-hiv-positive-latino-men
#1
Frank H Galvan, Laura M Bogart, David J Klein, Glenn J Wagner, Ying-Tung Chen
Discrimination has been found to have deleterious effects on physical health. The goal of the present study was to examine the association between perceived discrimination and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-positive Latino men and the extent to which medical mistrust serves as a mediator of that association. A series of linear and logistic regression models was used to test for mediation for three types of perceived discrimination (related to being Latino, being perceived as gay and being HIV-positive)...
March 23, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332029/brief-submaximal-isometric-exercise-improves-cold-pressor-pain-tolerance
#2
Emily Foxen-Craft, Lynnda M Dahlquist
Exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH), or the inhibition of pain following physical exercise, has been demonstrated in adults, but its mechanisms have remained unclear due to variations in methodology. This study aimed to address methodological imitations of past studies and contribute to the literature demonstrating the generalizability of EIH to brief submaximal isometric exercise and cold pressor pain. Young adults (n = 134) completed a baseline cold pressor trial, maximal voluntary contraction (hand grip strength) assessment, 10-min rest, and either a 2-min submaximal isometric handgrip exercise or a sham exercise in which no force was exerted, followed by a cold pressor posttest...
March 22, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28285411/expectations-affect-psychological-and-neurophysiological-benefits-even-after-a-single-bout-of-exercise-on-the-importance-of-considering-induced-negative-expectations
#3
LETTER
Vaitsa Giannouli
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 11, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28281106/tracking-daily-fatigue-fluctuations-in-multiple-sclerosis-ecological-momentary-assessment-provides-unique-insights
#4
Daniel J H Powell, Christina Liossi, Wolff Schlotz, Rona Moss-Morris
Studies investigating the prevalence, cause, and consequence of multiple sclerosis (MS) fatigue typically use single measures that implicitly assume symptom-stability over time, neglecting information about if, when, and why severity fluctuates. We aimed to examine the extent of moment-to-moment and day-to-day variability in fatigue in relapsing-remitting MS and healthy individuals, and identify daily life determinants of fluctuations. Over 4 weekdays, 76 participants (38 relapsing-remitting MS; 38 controls) recruited from multiple sites provided real-time self-reports six times daily (n = 1661 observations analyzed) measuring fatigue severity, stressors, mood, and physical exertion, and daily self-reports of sleep quality...
March 9, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28255751/substituting-activities-mediates-the-effect-of-cognitive-flexibility-on-physical-activity-a-daily-diary-study
#5
Scout M Kelly, John A Updegraff
Pursuit of physical activity goals often requires modifying plans, but research on these flexible processes is limited. Cognitive flexibility may heighten one's likelihood of using flexible self-regulatory strategies (e.g., substitution), thereby increasing physical activity. This study used daily diary methodology to test the indirect effect of cognitive flexibility on physical activity via activity substitution. A sample of 128 college students (73% female, mean age 19.9) completed baseline measures and cognitive flexibility assessments, then logged physical activity daily for 2 weeks...
March 2, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28255750/a-smartphone-app-delivered-randomized-factorial-trial-targeting-physical-activity-in-adults
#6
Jason Fanning, Sarah Roberts, Charles H Hillman, Sean P Mullen, Lee Ritterband, Edward McAuley
Rapid technological development has challenged researchers developing mobile moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) interventions. This 12-week randomized factorial intervention aimed to determine the individual and combined impact of a self-monitoring smartphone-app (tracking, feedback, education) and two theory-based modules (goal-setting, points-based feedback) on MVPA, key psychosocial outcomes, and application usage. Adults (N = 116; M age  = 41.38 ± 7.57) received (1) a basic self-monitoring app, (2) the basic app plus goal setting, (3) the basic app plus points-based feedback, or (4) the basic app plus both modules...
March 2, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28224264/how-people-think-about-the-chemicals-in-cigarette-smoke-a-systematic-review
#7
REVIEW
Jennifer C Morgan, M Justin Byron, Sabeeh A Baig, Irina Stepanov, Noel T Brewer
Laws and treaties compel countries to inform the public about harmful chemicals (constituents) in cigarette smoke. To encourage relevant research by behavioral scientists, we provide a primer on cigarette smoke toxicology and summarize research on how the public thinks about cigarette smoke chemicals. We systematically searched PubMed in July 2016 and reviewed citations from included articles. Four central findings emerged across 46 articles that met inclusion criteria. First, people were familiar with very few chemicals in cigarette smoke...
February 21, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28220343/effects-of-sleep-management-with-self-help-treatment-for-the-japanese-elderly-with-chronic-insomnia-a-quasi-experimental-study
#8
Norihisa Tamura, Hideki Tanaka
This study aimed to determine whether sleep management with self-help treatment is more effective in improving insomnia, compared to a waiting-list control. A total of 51 participants with insomnia, aged ≥60 years, were assigned to two groups: the treatment group or waiting-list control group. Intervention included sleep education, group work, moderately intense exercise, and self-help treatment using a sleep diary for 2 weeks. Participants completed the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI-J) and sleep diaries wearing an activity recorder pre- and post-treatment...
February 20, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28220342/icons-for-health-effects-of-cigarette-smoke-a-test-of-semiotic-type
#9
Allison J Lazard, Annie Schmidt, Huyen Vu, M Justin Byron, Ellen Peters, Marcella H Boynton, Noel T Brewer
We sought to identify icons to effectively communicate health harms of chemicals in cigarette smoke. Participants were a convenience sample of 701 U.S. adults. A within-subjects online experiment explored the effects of icon semiotic type: symbolic (arbitrary, most abstract), indexical, and iconic (representative, most concrete). Outcomes were perceived representation, affect toward smoking, elaboration, perceived severity, and perceived effectiveness. For not-easy-to-visualize harms of cancer and addiction, symbolic icons received the highest ratings (all p < ...
February 20, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28205015/self-management-of-dietary-intake-using-mindful-eating-to-improve-dietary-intake-for-individuals-with-early-stage-chronic-kidney-disease
#10
Gayle M Timmerman, Muna J Tahir, Richard M Lewis, Deborah Samoson, Holli Temple, Michele R Forman
Using mindful eating to improve specific dietary recommendations has not been adequately studied. This feasibility study examined an intervention, self-management of dietary intake using mindful eating, with 19 participants that had mild to moderate chronic kidney disease, using a prospective, single group, pretest-posttest design. The intervention had six weekly classes focused on self-management using mindful eating, goal-setting, problem-solving, and food label reading. Weight, body mass index (BMI), 3-day 24-h dietary recalls and fasting blood samples were measured...
February 15, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28197815/choosing-not-to-undergo-predictive-genetic-testing-for-hereditary-colorectal-cancer-syndromes-expanding-our-understanding-of-decliners-and-declining
#11
Louise A Keogh, Heather Niven, Alison Rutstein, Louisa Flander, Clara Gaff, Mark Jenkins
While medical research continues to investigate the genetic basis of cancer, and personalised prevention gains momentum, little research has been conducted with the individuals who decline predictive genetic testing for cancer. We recruited individuals who had been offered genetic testing for Lynch syndrome or bi-allelic MUTYH mutations due to their participation in a large, population-based, Australia-wide colorectal cancer study. Thirty-three individuals in mutation-carrying families, unaffected by cancer, who had actively or passively declined testing at one of four decision-making points, took part in a qualitative interview about their decision...
February 14, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28190133/depressive-symptoms-moderate-the-relationship-between-medication-regimen-complexity-and-objectively-measured-medication-adherence-in-adults-with-heart-failure
#12
Carly M Goldstein, Emily C Gathright, John Gunstad, Mary A Dolansky, Joseph D Redle, Richard Josephson, Shirley M Moore, Joel W Hughes
Patients with heart failure (HF) take many medications to manage their HF and comorbidities, and 20-50% experience depression. Depressed individuals with more complex medication regimens may be at greater risk for poor adherence. The aim of this study was to assess depressive symptoms as a moderator of the relationship between medication regimen complexity and medication adherence in an observational study of patients with HF. In hierarchical linear regression with the final sample of 299, the interaction of medication regimen complexity and depressive symptoms predicted medication adherence, p < ...
February 11, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28188413/high-levels-of-cynical-distrust-partly-predict-premature-mortality-in-middle-aged-to-ageing-men
#13
Kastytis Šmigelskas, Roza Joffė, Jolita Jonynienė, Juhani Julkunen, Jussi Kauhanen
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cynical distrust on mortality in middle-aged and aging men. The analysis is based on Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease study, follow-up from 1984 to 2011. Sample consisted of 2682 men, aged 42-61 years at baseline. Data on mortality was provided by the National Death Registry, causes of death were classified by the National Center of Statistics of Finland. Cynical distrust was measured at baseline using Cynical Distrust Scale. Survival analyses were conducted using Cox regression models...
February 10, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28181003/friendly-tanning-young-adults-engagement-with-friends-around-indoor-tanning
#14
Vivian M Rodríguez, Casey L Daniel, Brooke Foucault Welles, Alan C Geller, Jennifer L Hay
Indoor tanning (IT), particularly during early adulthood, increases risk for melanoma and is exceedingly common among youth. Social influence, including social norms, promotes IT but little is known about young adults' engagement with friends around tanning. We examined IT behaviors and tanning-related communication with friends at three universities. Of 837 participants, 261 (31%) reported ever tanning (90% female, 85% White). Of those, 113 (43%) were former tanners and 148 (57%) current tanners. Current tanners reported more social tanning and discussions with friends about tanning, more frequent outdoor tanning, high propensity to tan, and greater lifetime IT exposure than former tanners...
February 8, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28160229/executive-function-in-weight-loss-and-weight-loss-maintenance-a-conceptual-review-and-novel-neuropsychological-model-of-weight-control
#15
REVIEW
Katelyn M Gettens, Amy A Gorin
Weight loss maintenance is a complex, multifaceted process that presents a significant challenge for most individuals who lose weight. A growing body of literature indicates a strong relationship between cognitive dysfunction and excessive body weight, and suggests that a subset of high-order cognitive processes known as executive functions (EF) likely play an important role in weight management. Recent reviews cover neuropsychological correlates of weight status yet fail to address the role of executive function in the central dilemma of successful weight loss maintenance...
February 3, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28155003/discrimination-and-the-hpa-axis-current-evidence-and-future-directions
#16
REVIEW
David Busse, Ilona S Yim, Belinda Campos, Christopher K Marshburn
Numerous studies suggest that discrimination is associated with poor physical and mental health outcomes. Whereas the cardiovascular system has been extensively studied as a potential pathway linking discrimination with disease, the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis remains understudied. We conducted a systematic review of research on discrimination and related constructs as predictors and correlates of HPA axis activity. Twenty seven studies (10 experimental, 17 observational) met inclusion criteria...
February 2, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28155002/the-relationship-between-pain-disability-guilt-and-acceptance-in-low-back-pain-a-mediation-analysis
#17
Danijela Serbic, Tamar Pincus
Pain-related guilt is a common yet unexplored psychological factor in low back pain (LBP). It has recently been linked to greater depression, anxiety and disability in LBP, hence an understanding of how it can be managed in the presence of pain and disability is necessary. Since acceptance of pain has been shown to be associated with improved outcomes in chronic pain, we examined whether it might also help reduce guilt in people with LBP. To this end, a series of mediation analyses were conducted on data from 287 patients with chronic LBP, in which acceptance of pain was tested as a mediator of the relationship between pain/disability and guilt...
February 2, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28155001/change-in-urinary-cortisol-excretion-mediates-the-effect-of-angry-hostile-mood-on-9-month-diastolic-blood-pressure-in-hiv-adults
#18
Roger C McIntosh, Michael Antoni, Adam Carrico, Ron Duran, Barry E Hurwitz, Gail Ironson, Mary Ann Fletcher, Nancy Klimas, Mahendra Kumar, Neil Schneiderman
Cardiovascular disease is a growing concern in HIV disease management and nearly 1 out of 3 persons living with the virus is hypertensive. Biobehavioral factors such as anger, hostility, and HPA axis reactivity are emperically linked to blood pressure regulation. Whether HPA axis or mood disturbance increases risk for hypertension remains unclear in HIV disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether 9-month change in angry/hostile mood predicts alterations in systolic (SBP) or diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and whether this change is mediated by 24-h urinary cortisol (CORT) output...
February 2, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28155000/refinement-of-measures-to-assess-psychosocial-constructs-associated-with-skin-cancer-risk-and-protective-behaviors-of-young-adults
#19
C J Heckman, E Handorf, S D Darlow, A L Yaroch, S Raivitch
The study's purpose was to select/refine measures assessing psychosocial constructs associated with skin cancer risk/protective behaviors. Cognitive interviewing was conducted with twenty participants locally, and a survey was conducted with 965 adults aged 18-25 years at moderate to high risk of developing skin cancer, recruited nationally online. Psychosocial measures assessed variables from the Integrative Model of Behavior Prediction. As a result of expert review and cognitive interviewing, items were removed, added, and/or made simpler, more personal, consistent, and less ambiguous...
February 2, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28120228/a-brief-measure-of-reactance-to-health-warnings
#20
Marissa G Hall, Paschal Sheeran, Seth M Noar, Kurt M Ribisl, Marcella H Boynton, Noel T Brewer
Reactance to persuasive messages involves perceived threat to freedom, anger, and counterarguing that may undermine the impact of health warnings. To understand reactance's effects, reliable and valid assessment is critical. We sought to develop and validate a brief Reactance to Health Warnings Scale (RHWS). Two independent samples of US adults completed the brief RHWS in studies that presented warnings on cigarette packs that smokers carried with them for 4 weeks (Study 1; n = 2149) or as digital images of cigarette packs that participants viewed briefly (Study 2; n = 1413)...
January 24, 2017: Journal of Behavioral Medicine
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