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International Journal of Behavioral Development

Anna Yaros, John E Lochman, Karen C Wells
Aggression among youth is public health problem that is often studied in the context of how youth interpret social information. Social cognitive factors, especially hostile attribution biases, have been identified as risk factors for the development of youth aggression, particularly across the transition to middle school. Parental behaviors, including parental aggression to children in the form of corporal punishment and other aggressive behavior, have also been linked to aggressive behavior in children at these ages...
September 2016: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Heather R Fuller-Iglesias, Toni Antonucci
The Convoy Model suggests that at different stages of the lifespan the makeup of the social support network varies in step with developmental and contextual needs. Cultural norms may shape the makeup of social convoys as well as denote socio-demographic differences in social support. This study examines the social convoys of adults in Mexico. Specifically, it examines whether social network structure varies by age, gender, and education level, thus addressing the paucity of research on interpersonal relations in Mexico...
July 2016: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Muzik Maria, Abelson James, McGinnis Ellen, Lopez-Duran Nestor, Martinez-Torteya Cecilia
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2016: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Fanny-Alexandra Guimond, Brett Laursen, Frank Vitaro, Mara Brendgen, Ginette Dionne, Michel Boivin
This study used a genetically controlled design to examine the direction and the magnitude of effects in the over-time associations between perceived relationship quality with mothers and adolescent maladjustment (i.e., depressive symptoms and delinquency). A total of 163 monozygotic (MZ) twins pairs (85 female pairs, 78 male pairs) completed questionnaires at ages 13 and 14. Non-genetically controlled path analyses models (in which one member of each twin dyad was randomly selected for analyses) were compared with genetically controlled path analyses models (in which MZ-twin difference scores were included in analyses)...
May 2016: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Kirby Deater-Deckard
Most of the individual difference variance in the population is found within families, yet studying the processes causing this variation is difficult due to confounds between genetic and nongenetic influences. Quasi-experiments can be used to test hypotheses regarding environment exposure (e.g., timing, duration) while controlling for genetic confounds. To illustrate, two studies of cognitive self-regulation in childhood (i.e., working memory [WM], effortful control [EC], attention span/persistence [A/P]) are presented...
May 2016: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Robinson Stephanie, Lachman Margie, Rickenbach Elizabeth
The effective use of self-regulatory strategies, such as selection, optimization, and compensation (SOC) requires resources. However, it is theorized that SOC use is most advantageous for those experiencing losses and diminishing resources. The present study explored this seeming paradox within the context of limitations or constraints due to aging, low cognitive resources, and daily stress in relation to everyday memory problems. We examined whether SOC usage varied by age and level of constraints, and if the relationship between resources and memory problems was mitigated by SOC usage...
March 2016: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Jungmeen Kim-Spoon, Rachel Kahn, Kirby Deater-Deckard, Pearl H Chiu, Laurence Steinberg, Brooks King-Casas
Adolescence is characterized by increasing incidence of health risk behaviors, including experimentation with drugs and alcohol. To fill the gap in our understanding of the associations between risky decision-making and health risk behaviors, we investigated associations between laboratory-based risky decision-making using the Stoplight task and self-reported health risk behaviors. Given that there has been no examination of potential age differences in the associations between risky decision-making and health risk behaviors, we also examined whether the association of risky decision-making with health risk behaviors is consistent across adolescence and adulthood using two-group structural equation modeling (SEM)...
January 1, 2016: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Jocelyn Bachevalier
Studies investigating the development of memory processes and their neural substrates have flourished over the last two decades. The review by Jabès and Nelson (2015) adds an important piece to our understanding of the maturation of different elements and circuits within the hippocampal system and their association with the progressive development of hippocampal-dependent memory processes in humans. In this accompanying commentary, we explore some additional connections between the nonhuman primate work and the human data, and take the opportunity to highlight some common and additional interpretations of the results...
July 1, 2015: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Andrea Finlay, Laura Wray-Lake, Michael Warren, Jennifer L Maggs
Adolescent future values - beliefs about what will matter to them in the future - may shape their adult behavior. Utilizing a national longitudinal British sample, this study examined whether adolescent future values in six domains (i.e., family responsibility, full-time job, personal responsibility, autonomy, civic responsibility, and hedonistic privilege) predicted adult social roles, civic behaviors, and alcohol use. Future values positively predicted behaviors within the same domain; fewer cross-domain associations were evident...
July 1, 2015: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Charissa Cheah, Jing Yu, Craig Hart, Shuyan Sun, Joseph Olsen
Despite the theoretical conceptualization of parental psychological control as a multidimensional construct, the majority of previous studies have examined psychological control as a unidimensional scale. Moreover, the conceptualization of shaming and its associations with love withdrawal and guilt induction are unclear. The current study aimed to fill these gaps by evaluating the latent factor structure underlying 18 items from Olsen et al. (2002) that were conceptually relevant to love withdrawal, guilt induction, and shaming practices in a sample of 169 mothers of Chinese-American preschoolers...
May 1, 2015: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Zoe H Brett, Margaret Sheridan, Kate Humphreys, Anna Smyke, Mary Margaret Gleason, Nathan Fox, Charles Zeanah, Charles Nelson, Stacy Drury
An individual's neurodevelopmental and cognitive sequelae to negative early experiences may, in part, be explained by genetic susceptibility. We examined whether extreme differences in the early caregiving environment, defined as exposure to severe psychosocial deprivation associated with institutional care compared to normative rearing, interacted with a biologically informed genoset comprising BDNF (rs6265), COMT (rs4680), and SIRT1 (rs3758391) to predict distinct outcomes of neurodevelopment at age 8 (N = 193, 97 males and 96 females)...
March 2015: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Julie Maslowsky, Justin Jager, Douglas Hemken
Latent variables are common in psychological research. Research questions involving the interaction of two variables are likewise quite common. Methods for estimating and interpreting interactions between latent variables within a structural equation modeling framework have recently become available. The latent moderated structural equations (LMS) method is one that is built into Mplus software. The potential utility of this method is limited by the fact that the models do not produce traditional model fit indices, standardized coefficients, or effect sizes for the latent interaction, which renders model fitting and interpretation of the latent variable interaction difficult...
January 1, 2015: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Margie E Lachman, Salom Teshale, Stefan Agrigoroaei
We provide evidence for multidirectionality, variability, and plasticity in the nature and direction of change in physical health, cognitive functioning, and well-being during the middle years of the life course. The picture of well-being in midlife based on longitudinal data from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) study is a more positive one than portrayed in previous cross-sectional studies. We present middle age as a pivotal period in the life course in terms of balancing growth and decline, linking earlier and later periods of life, and bridging younger and older generations...
January 1, 2015: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Krystal M Ribot, Erika Hoff
Relations between bilingual children's patterns of conversational code-switching (responding to one language with another), the balance of their dual language input, and their expressive and receptive proficiency in two languages were examined in 115 2½-year-old simultaneous Spanish-English bilinguals in the U.S. Children were more likely to code-switch in response to Spanish than English. Children's expressive vocabulary scores were higher in English than in Spanish, while their English and Spanish receptive language scores were not different...
July 1, 2014: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Christy D Wolfe, Jing Zhang, Jungmeen Kim-Spoon, Martha Ann Bell
Moderate, yet relatively consistent, associations between cognitive performance and shyness have been reported throughout the child and adult literatures. The current study assessed longitudinal associations between cognition (i.e., executive functioning) and parent-report temperamental shyness from infancy to early childhood and used temporal order to explore directionality of the relations. Two hundred eleven children contributed data at multiple ages (5-months, 10-months, 2-years, 3-years, and 4-years). The results indicated a complex pattern of association between cognition and shyness in early development and provided tentative support for both cognitive ability and temperament as causal agents at different developmental time points...
May 1, 2014: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Amanda E Guyer, Justin D Caouette, Clinton C Lee, Sarah K Ruiz
Relative to children and adults, adolescents are highly focused on being evaluated by peers. This increased attention to peer evaluation has implications for emotion regulation in adolescence, but little is known about the characteristics of the evaluatee and evaluator that influence emotional reactions to evaluative outcomes. The present study used a computer-based social evaluation task to examine predictors of adolescents' emotional responses to feedback from unknown peers. Nine-to-seventeen-year-olds (N = 36) completed the "chatroom task" and indicated the degree to which each peer would be interested in interacting with them and how good they felt after receiving acceptance and rejection feedback from peers...
March 1, 2014: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Tammy English, Laura L Carstensen
Past research has documented age differences in the size and composition of social networks that suggest that networks grow smaller with age and include an increasingly greater proportion of well-known social partners. According to socioemotional selectivity theory, such changes in social network composition serve an antecedent emotion regulatory function that supports an age-related increase in the priority that people place on emotional well-being. The present study employed a longitudinal design with a sample that spanned the full adult age range to examine whether there is evidence of within-individual (developmental) change in social networks and whether the characteristics of relationships predict emotional experiences in daily life...
March 1, 2014: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Shannon T Lipscomb, Heidemarie Laurent, Jenae M Neiderhiser, Daniel S Shaw, Misaki N Natsuaki, David Reiss, Leslie D Leve
The current study examined interactions among genetic influences and children's early environments on the development of externalizing behaviors from 18 months to 6 years of age. Participants included 233 families linked through adoption (birth parents and adoptive families). Genetic influences were assessed by birth parent temperamental regulation. Early environments included both family (overreactive parenting) and out-of-home factors (center-based Early Care and Education; ECE). Overreactive parenting predicted more child externalizing behaviors...
January 1, 2014: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Gretchen Miller Wrobel, Harold D Grotevant, Diana R Samek, Lynn Von Korff
The Adoption Communication Pathway(ACP) model was used to test the potential mediating effect of curiosity on adoption information seeking in a sample of 143 emerging adult adoptees (mean age = 25.0 years) who were adopted as infants within the United States by parents of the same race. Adoptees were interviewed about their intentions and actions taken to gather new information about their birth mothers and fathers. As expected, level of curiosity was positively associated with information seeking behavior...
September 1, 2013: International Journal of Behavioral Development
Kristine Marceau, Nastassia Hajal, Leslie D Leve, David Reiss, Daniel S Shaw, Jody M Ganiban, Linda C Mayes, Jenae M Neiderhiser
This study demonstrates the unique contributions of perinatal risk and genetic and environmental influences on child behavior using data from 561 domestic US adoption triads (birth mothers, adopted child, and adoptive parents). Findings show distinct patterns of associations among genetic (birth mother psychopathology), prenatal (six maternal reported aggregate scores characterizing total obstetric complications, perinatal internalizing symptoms, pregnancy complications, exposure to toxins, substance use, and neonatal complications), and postnatal influences (adoptive parent 18-month internalizing symptoms and over-reactive parenting) and toddler behavior problems (CBCL subscales at 27 months)...
July 1, 2013: International Journal of Behavioral Development
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