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Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29030747/2017-cmp-honoree-professor-shirley-lindenbaum
#1
EDITORIAL
Atwood D Gaines
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 13, 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29019040/migraine-like-visual-auras-among-traumatized-cambodians-with-ptsd-fear-of-ghost-attack-and-other-disasters
#2
Devon E Hinton, Ria Reis, Joop de Jong
This article profiles visual auras among traumatized Cambodian refugees attending a psychiatric clinic. Thirty-six percent (54/150) had experienced an aura in the previous 4 weeks, almost always phosphenes (48% [26/54]) or a scintillating scotoma (74% [40/54]). Aura and PTSD were highly associated: patients with visual aura in the last month had greater PTSD severity, 3.6 (SD = 1.8) versus 1.9 (SD = 1.6), t = 10.2 (df = 85), p < 0.001, and patients with PTSD had a higher rate of visual aura in the last month, 69% (22/32) versus 13% (7/55), odds ratio 15...
October 10, 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28948435/untamed-jianghu-or-emerging-profession-diagnosing-the-psycho-boom-amid-china-s-mental-health-legislation
#3
Hsuan-Ying Huang
This article focuses on the psychotherapy debate in China that was triggered by the country's mental health legislation. Seeing the release of the draft Mental Health Law in 2011 as a "diagnostic event" (Moore in Am Ethnol 14(4):727-736, 1987), I examine the debate in order to unravel the underlying logic and ongoing dynamics of the psycho-boom that has become a conspicuous trend in urban China since the early 2000s. Drawing on my fieldwork in Beijing and Shanghai, I use the two keywords of the debate-"jianghu" (literally "rivers and lakes"), an indigenous term that evokes an untamed realm, and "profession," a foreign concept whose translation requires re-translation-to organize my delineation of its contours...
September 25, 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28831684/distinct-and-untamed-articulating-bulimic-identities
#4
Karin Eli
Bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa are inextricably linked, with substantial clinical and epidemiological overlaps. Yet, while anorexia has been analyzed extensively in medical anthropology, bulimia remains under-theorized. This is, perhaps, because, compared to self-starvation, binge eating presents a logic of practice that is difficult to reconcile with culturally reified notions of self-control, transcendence, and hard work. Thus, although anthropologists have analyzed anorexic subjectivities as imbued with a sense of cleanliness and purity, moral superiority, and heroics, similar analyses have not been extended to bulimic subjectivities; instead, bulimia has been subsumed, as a tangential disorder, into analyses of anorexia...
August 22, 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28819807/farewell-address-a-decade-in-reflection
#5
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 17, 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28779277/a-sorrow-shared-is-a-sorrow-halved-the-search-for-empathetic-understanding-of-family-members-of-a-person-with-early-onset-dementia
#6
Silke Hoppe
In this article, I explore how family members of a person with early-onset dementia in the Netherlands attempt to achieve empathetic understanding from significant others, and the barriers they encounter in the process. Based on qualitative interviews, I show that the type of relationship shapes the choices people have to communicate their suffering and their expectations regarding the reactions of others. This article builds on theoretical work on empathy and problematises the notion of shared experiences...
August 4, 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28766079/lawful-sinners-reproductive-governance-and-moral-agency-around-abortion-in-mexico
#7
Elyse Ona Singer
The Catholic Hierarchy unequivocally bans abortion, defining it as a mortal sin. In Mexico City, where the Catholic Church wields considerable political and popular power, abortion was recently decriminalized in a historic vote. Of the roughly 170,000 abortions that have been carried out in Mexico City's new public sector abortion program to date, more than 60% were among self-reported Catholic women. Drawing on eighteen months of fieldwork, including interviews with 34 Catholic patients, this article examines how Catholic women in Mexico City grapple with abortion decisions that contravene Church teachings in the context of recent abortion reform...
August 1, 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28748317/books%C3%A2-received
#8
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 26, 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28726015/community-perceptions-of-hospitals-and-shared-physical-space-a-qualitative-study
#9
Daniel Skinner, Berkeley Franz, Kelly Kelleher, Robert Penfold
In addition to providing critical medical services to communities, hospitals are also forces of broader change when seen from the perspective of neighborhood development. Over the past few decades the obligation on the part of U.S. nonprofit hospitals to positively impact the communities in which they are located has become entrenched in both U.S. tax law and the practices of many hospitals. This article presents findings from a grounded theory qualitative study of the relationship between a non-profit children's hospital in Columbus, Ohio, and the neighborhood in which it is located...
July 19, 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28717863/global-mental-health-and-adolescent-anxiety-kin-care-and-struggle-in-new-mexico
#10
Janis H Jenkins, Annika Stone
While recent developments within the field of global mental health have illuminated the reality of serious mental health difficulties worldwide, particularly in low-income settings, research that focuses on children and adolescents remains underdeveloped. This is especially the case with respect to ethnographic studies of lived experience of adolescents diagnosed with serious mental health conditions. Drawing from an interdisciplinary study of adolescents in New Mexico who were afflicted with a broad range of disorders according to contemporary research diagnostic criteria, this article focuses on anxiety-related conditions with respect to subjective experience and social-ecological contexts of living with such conditions...
July 17, 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28711953/attachment-mothering-and-mental-illness-mother-infant-therapy-in-an-institutional-context
#11
Sonia Masciantonio, Susan R Hemer, Anna Chur-Hansen
This paper is an ethnographic exploration of how attachment theory underpins therapeutic practices in an Australian institutional context where mothers of infants have been diagnosed and are undergoing treatment for mental illness. We argue that attachment theory in this particular context rests on a series of principles or assumptions: that attachment theory is universally applicable; that attachment is dyadic and gendered; that there is an attachment template formed which can be transferred across generations and shapes future social interactions; that there is understood to be a mental health risk to the infant when attachment is characterised as problematic; and that this risk can be mitigated through the therapeutic practices advocated by the institution...
July 15, 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28685366/guan-care-control-an-ethnographic-understanding-of-care-for-people-with-severe-mental-illness-from-shanghai-s-urban-communities
#12
Jianfeng Zhu, Tianshu Pan, Hai Yu, Dong Dong
This article investigates how the political culture of Guan (care/control) in China is played out across the platforms of the state, the community and the family through the lens of caring for people with severe mental illness in urban Shanghai. Based on ethnographic data collected from six communities in a district of Shanghai, we provide a nuanced understanding of the roles of family members, street committees and other governmental organizations in their daily practices of caring for people with severe mental illness...
July 6, 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577111/family-life-and-social-medicine-discourses-and-discontents-surrounding-puebla-s-psychiatric-care
#13
Kathryn Law Hale
Drawing on clinical data from 15 months of on-site participant observation in the only public psychiatric hospital in the state of Puebla, Mexico, this article advances our understanding of globalization in relation to psychiatry. I challenge the construction of psychiatry as only treating the individual patient and provide grounded doctor-patient-family member interaction in a Mexican psychiatric clinic in order to review what happens when doctors cannot interact with patients as atomized individuals even though in theory they are trained to think of patients that way...
June 2, 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28397029/introduction-to-moral-and-other-laboratories
#14
EDITORIAL
Teresa Kuan, Lone Grøn
"Moral (and other) laboratories" is a special issue that draws on Cheryl Mattingly's notion of the "moral laboratory" to explore the uncanny interface between laboratory ethnography and moral anthropology, and to examine the relationship between experience and experiment. We ask whether laboratory work may provoke new insights about experimental practices in other social spaces such as homes, clinics, and neighborhoods, and conversely, whether the study of morality may provoke new insights about laboratory practices as they unfold in the day-to-day interactions between test tubes, animals, apparatuses, scientists, and technicians...
June 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28389901/the-tipping-of-the-big-stone-and-life-itself-obesity-moral-work-and-responsive-selves-over-time
#15
Lone Grøn
Why is "everything I know is the right thing to do a million miles removed from what I do in reality?" This question posed by Rita, my main interlocutor and friend in a fieldwork that started in 2001-2003 and was taken up again in 2014-2015, opens up an exploration of moral work and moral selves in the context of the obesity epidemic and weight loss processes. I address these questions through the notion of "moral laboratories" taking up Mattingly's argument that moral cultivation over time cannot be disconnected from a notion of self...
June 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28378038/the-moral-lives-of-laboratory-monkeys-television-and-the-ethics-of-care
#16
Lesley A Sharp
Why do lab monkeys watch TV? This essay examines the preponderance of televisions in primate housing units based in academic research laboratories. Within such labs, television and related visual media are glossed as part-and-parcel of welfare or species-specific enrichment practices intended for research monkeys, a logic that is simultaneously historically- and ontologically-based. In many research centers, television figures prominently in the two inseparable domains of a lab monkey's life: as a research tool employed during experiments, and in housing units where captive monkeys are said to enjoy watching TV during "down time...
June 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28378036/engaging-with-dementia-moral-experiments-in-art-and-friendship
#17
Janelle S Taylor
The box-office as well as critical success of the 2014 major motion picture Still Alice, starring Julianne Moore in the title role and based on the bestselling novel of the same name by the Harvard-trained neuroscientist Lisa Genova (Still Alice. Simon & Schuster, New York, 2009), marked an important moment in public cultural representations of people with dementia. Still Alice tells the story of Alice Howland, an eminent scientist whose increasing memory lapses are eventually diagnosed as early-onset Alzheimer's, and chronicles the transformations in her family relationships as her husband and three children respond to her decline in different ways...
June 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28150183/at-the-edge-of-safety-moral-experimentation-in-the-case-of-family-therapy
#18
Teresa Kuan
"At the Edge of Safety" argues for thinking of structural family therapy as a "moral laboratory." Borrowing a trope from Cheryl Mattingly's recent book Moral Laboratories, the article reconsiders a therapeutic style that was once controversial by analyzing personal stories of supervision-i.e. professional training-in light of Mattingly's suggestion that a social space in which people conduct experiments on themselves and their lives may be considered a moral laboratory. Family therapy is especially good to think with, because it is simultaneously a real and a metaphorical laboratory, physically lab-like in its use of visual technologies, yet moral in the way it puts the possibility for situational change in the hands of human actors...
June 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28101699/humanity-at-the-edge-the-moral-laboratory-of-feeding-precarious-lives
#19
Mette N Svendsen, Iben M Gjødsbøl, Mie S Dam, Laura E Navne
At the heart of anthropology and the social sciences lies a notion of human existence according to which humans and animals share the basic need for food, but only humans have the capacity for morality. Based on fieldwork in a pig laboratory, a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and a dementia nursing home, we follow practices of feeding precarious lives lacking most markers of human personhood, including the exercise of moral judgment. Despite the absence of such markers, laboratory researchers and caregivers in these three sites do not abstain from engaging in questions about the moral status of the piglets, infants, and people with dementia in their care...
June 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28551759/seeing-a-brain-through-an-other-the-informant-s-share-in-the-diagnosis-of-dementia
#20
Laurence Anne Tessier
This article takes up the neuroscientific assumption of our brains as "solitary" and contrasts this understanding with the description of actual clinical practices. Drawing on observations of clinical consultations and team meetings in a world famous US center for the diagnosis of dementia, I examine how the "informant", a member of the patient's family, participates in the diagnosis process. Based on specific situations in which the informant is judged to be a "bad" one, I inquire as to how clinicians use what they understand of the affective relationships between the patient and the bad informant in order to make a diagnosis...
May 27, 2017: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
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